Purdue student innovators recognized for patented discoveries

April 24, 2014  


Foundation Innovators

Amiya Maji, a graduate student in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Rochelle Mellish, a graduate student in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Engineering, network during the third annual Purdue Student Innovators Reception. The event honored students who contributed to research that led to the filing of a patent through the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization. (Purdue Research Foundation photo/Vincent Walter) Download Photo

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – More than 50 Purdue University students were recognized Wednesday (April 23) at the third annual Purdue Student Innovators Reception held in the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship.

The event recognized student innovators who contributed to research that resulted in a patentable invention. There were a total of 233 graduate and undergraduate students named as a contributor on patents filed through the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization during the 2012-13 fiscal year.

"Research is a cornerstone for education and innovation, and the students directly involved in the patenting of an innovation are to be commended for their work," said Elizabeth Hart-Wells, vice president of the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization. "To have so many students involved in technology transfer is a true testament to their ingenuity and commitment to their respective areas of study."

The keynote speakers at the event were Sean Connell and Jianming "Ming" Li, who founded the life sciences company Medtric Biotech as graduate students at Purdue. Connell and Li developed and patented a topical antimicrobial technology that kills germs and accelerates wound healing.

Greg Williams, a doctoral student in the School of Biomedical Engineering who was recognized at the event, helped conduct research that led to a patent for a device to study cell culturing in 3-D.

"This reception gives us the opportunity to network and learn about the research being done by students in other disciplines," Williams said. "And it provides encouragement and an incentive for us to continue our own work."

The event is sponsored by the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, and the Purdue Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program.

Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the United States. The office provides ongoing support for Purdue economic development initiatives that benefit the university's academic activities.

Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship fosters the understanding and application of entrepreneurship with faculty and students across the Purdue campus. Joe Pekny is the center's director.

The Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program is a series of five business-development courses for undergraduate students to gain a certificate in entrepreneurship. Nathalie Duval-Couetil is director of the certificate program.

Media contact: Cynthia Sequin, 765-413-6031, casequin@prf.org

Source: Elizabeth Hart-Wells, 765-588-3473, eahart-wells@prf.org

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