Recent News

Purdue researchers use Wii games to help Parkinson’s patients

September 27, 2017

A pair of Purdue University professors are using the popular Nintendo Wii gaming system to help people with Parkinson’s disease. Jessica Huber and Jeff Haddad from the College of Health and Human Sciences are studying how playing specially created games can improve a patient’s movement, speech and overall quality of life.

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NEW MINI SATELLITE CAN BE PROPELLED WITH WATER

August 10, 2017

Scientists have developed a new type of miniature satellite called CubeSat that can be manoeuvred in space with tiny bursts of water vapour.

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New mini satellite can be propelled with water

August 9, 2017

Scientists have developed a new type of miniature satellite called CubeSat that can be manoeuvred in space with tiny bursts of water vapour. Low-cost microsatellites and nanosatellites - far smaller than conventional spacecraft - have become increasingly prevalent. Thousands of these miniature satellites might be launched to perform a variety of tasks, from high-resolution imaging and internet services, to disaster response, environmental monitoring and military surveillance.

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New cancer therapy eliminates toxic delivery vehicles for microRNA

August 4, 2017

Researchers at Purdue University have discovered a mechanism for delivering tumor-suppressing microRNAs that eliminates the need for toxic delivery vehicles.

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Study shows non-toxic underwater adhesive could bring new surgical glue

July 29, 2017

A non-toxic glue modeled after adhesive proteins produced by mussels and other creatures has been found to outperform commercially available products, pointing toward potential surgical glues to replace sutures and staples. More than 230 million major surgeries are performed worldwide each year, and over 12 million traumatic wounds are treated in the United States alone. About 60 percent of these wounds are closed using mechanical methods such as sutures and staples.

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New AI system can create 3D models from photos

July 28, 2017

Scientists, including one of Indian origin, have developed a new artificial intelligence software that can create 3D models from two dimensional photographs, an advance that could allow future robots to navigate in the real world. When fully developed, the method called SurfNet could have significant applications in the fields of 3D searches on the internet researchers said. "The "magical" capability of AI deep learning is that it is able to learn abstractly," said Karthik Ramani, professor at Purdue University in the US.

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MRI device could bridge neuro-technologies for medical diagnostics

July 21, 2017

A technology being developed at Purdue University could provide an affordable, smart, self-learning device that, when placed into existing MRI machines could allow medical professionals to monitor patients more effectively and safely, by performing concurrent medical imaging and recording for diagnostic purposes.

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Purdue University develops MRI device

July 21, 2017

Purdue University has developed a technology to provide affordable, smart, self-learning device. The device when placed into existing MRI machines could allow medical professionals to monitor patients more effectively and safely, by performing concurrent medical imaging and recording for diagnostic purposes.

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Why eradication of mosquitoes is not the best idea

July 13, 2017

Mosquitoes have co-evolved with many species, so there are likely other organisms that depend on them as a food source — thus wiping out the species may have wider effects, the researchers said. “To yank (mosquitoes) out abruptly, I don’t know what that does as they are a large part of the biomass in many ecosystems,” Catherine Hill, Professor at the Purdue University in US state of Indiana, said in a statement.

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Why eradication of mosquitoes is not the best idea

July 13, 2017

Mosquitoes, who play a major role in various ecosystems, should not be simply wiped out — instead their ability to transmit diseases should be suppressed, a team of scientists has said. Mosquitoes have co-evolved with many species, so there are likely other organisms that depend on them as a food source — thus wiping out the species may have wider effects, the researchers said. “To yank (mosquitoes) out abruptly, I don’t know what that does as they are a large part of the biomass in many ecosystems,” Catherine Hill, Professor at the Purdue University in US state of Indiana, said in a statement.

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