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Faculty Profiles

Here you will find quick summaries of the faculty who are participating in our program.


  • Spring 2012 Cohort

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    Dr. Cordelia Brown
    ECE 270 - Introduction to Digital Systems Design

    Dr. Brown has a joint appointment in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Engineering Education. She teaches Digital Systems Design to approximately 200 students each year. Her course re-design will feature increased student-centered activities in lecture, and will target development of students’ critical thinking skills.

     

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    Dr. Richard Buckius
    Vice President for Research

    Dr. Buckius is Vice President for Research, Professor of Mechanical Engineering charged with assisting faculty and staff in their research efforts and leading research administration and oversight, research development and proposal preparation, funding opportunities, and private sector partnerships. He serves as a participant in the IMPACT Program.

     

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    Dr. Mary Burbrink
    SOC 100 - Introductory Sociology

    Dr. Burbrink will be teaching a re-designed online section of SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology with 200 students. This course gives students the foundation needed to be successful in subsequent sociology classes. It is a requirement for Sociology minors and majors, but is a popular elective for students from many diverse disciplines across campus. Students that take this course are also at different levels of their academic career.

     

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    Dr. Karen Chang
    NUR 223 - Foundations of Research and EBP

    Dr. Chang is passionate in using information technologies (IT) to improve the quality of nursing education and patient care. She has secured several IT-related grants, integrated the use of IT to the courses she taught, helped faculty and staff members gain competencies in using IT, and collaborated with other disciplines and hospitals to develop, implement, and evaluate the effects of IT on the quality of nursing education and patient care.

     

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    Dr. Rosalee (Rosie) Clawson
    POL 413 - The Human Basis of Politics

    Dr. Clawson is Professor of Political Science in the College of Liberal Arts and serves as a faculty consultant for the Center for Instructional Excellence. Her research focuses on American politics, especially public opinion, political psychology, mass media, and the politics of race, class, and gender. She is a member of the Teaching Academy and has been inducted into the Purdue University Book of Great Teachers. She advises Purdue’s award-winning chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the political science honor society. She is also a recipient of the Purdue University Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award in memory of Charles B. Murphy. Dr. Clawson will be teaching a re-designed POL 413: The Human Basis of Politics during the Fall semester of 2013. During class time students will engage in hands-on analysis of public opinion survey data to improve their empirical analysis skills and enhance their knowledge of course content. .

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    Bill Crum
    CS 159 - Programming Applications for Engineers

    Bill Crum is a continuing lecturer in the Department of Computer Science. He leads both CS 158 (C Programming) and CS 159 (Programming Applications for Engineers) with a total annual enrollment of over 1400 students. With a weekly lab that currently implements a collaborative learning environment it is the goal of the redesign experience to introduce collaboration for learning into the large lecture experience. As reported as successful among the first IMPACT cohort faculty, lecture content will be identified as a candidate to be presented in an asynchronous, always available, on-line format opening more time for an interactive and engaging classroom experience.

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    Dr. Patti Darbishire
    PHARM

    Dr. Darbishire is the Director for Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences and Clinical Associate Professor. She joined the IMPACT program as a participant to support and guide Sheri Slaven in the redesign of her PHARM820 course.

     

     

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    Brenda Downing
    GS 290 - Study Skills Seminar

    Brenda’s IMPACT course is an elective open to first and second year students from colleges across the Purdue campus. The course is designed for students to master and integrate learning strategies and self-regulation methods to optimize academic success. It reaches about 250 students annually, approximately 80 of which participate in Brenda’s sections. Her teaching draws from a psychology background and diverse instructional experiences ranging from a community college in California to a medical school and residency program in Virginia.

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    Dr. Deborah Fleetham
    HIST 104 - Introduction to the Modern World

    Dr. Fleetham will be moving towards an online course that traces the development of the West from the era of Renaissance to the present. We will trace the changing understanding of the West as a result of its expansion into the Americas, Africa, and Asia; its political and industrial revolutions; and its total.

     

     

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    Dr. Mark French
    MET 213 - Dynamics

    Dr. R. Mark French is an Assistant Professor Purdue's College of Technology in the Department of Mechanical Engineering Technology. His areas of expertise include optical test methods, structural dynamics, acoustics and signal processing. He is also a developer of the Mechanical Engineering Technology Acoustics Lab at Purdue University (METAL).

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    Ellen Gundlach
    STAT 113 - Statistics and Society

    Ellen Gundlach will be teaching traditional large-lecture sections, online sections, and a new pilot section of a "flipped" (hybrid) STAT 113: Statistics in Society course in the Fall 2012 semester. Online lectures using Adobe Presenter, online homework, Mixable discussion assignments, and proctored pencil-and-paper exams are available for students in all 3 versions of the course. The traditional lectures will also attend lecture class twice a week with iClickers and recitations with their t.a. once a week. The online students will have the flexibility of doing everything except the exams online. The "flipped" class students will not have formal lecture or recitation classes, but they will attend discussion/active learning sections once a week in a room designed for that purpose to incorporate more peer-to-peer learning and better conversations with the instructor.

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    Dr. Andrew Hirsch
    PHYS 172 - Modern Mechanics

    Dr. Hirsch spearheaded the revision to the introductory mechanics course while he served as department head of physics, 1997-2007. He is now engaged in teaching and improving this course which is taken by approximately 2400 Science and Engineering students each year. Improvements will include online "pre-flight" introductions to those concepts students find most challenging and several components of the successful Scale-UP project.

     

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    Dr. Rebecca Lindell
    PHYS 172 - Modern Mechanics

    Dr. Lindell is a visiting Scholar at Purdue University’s Physics Department who has joined Dr. Andrew Hirsch in his course redesign in IMPACT.

     

     

     

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    Dr. Loretta (Sue) Loesch-Fries
    BTNY 301 - Introductory Plant Pathology

    Introductory plant pathology (BTNY 301) is a 3-hr lecture and laboratory course taught each semester, primarily as a service course for a number of agricultural majors. Three professors rotate in teaching the course (RD Martyn, Dr. S. Loesch-Fries and C. Woloshuk). Class size typically runs around 40 students per semester. The class lecture is heavily orientated towards the basic biology of the diverse group of microorganisms (pathogens), examples of the diseases they cause and how they are managed. Mastering the class requires a significant amount of memorization, as most of the material is new to the student, as well as a completely new, scientific vocabulary. The class has been taught as a traditional two lecture / wk format with a one 2-hr, hands on laboratory / wk. This format allows little time for discussion or team projects. My goals of the redesign are to develop new means of engaging the students more, generating more in-depth discussion, and in helping them develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, without necessarily increasing the credit hours of the course, e.g. making it a 4 hr. course.

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    Dr. Ray Martyn
    BTNY 301 - Introductory Plant Pathology

    Introductory plant pathology (BTNY 301) is a 3-hr lecture and laboratory course taught each semester, primarily as a service course for a number of agricultural majors. Three professors rotate in teaching the course (RD Martyn, S. Loesch-Fries and C. Woloshuk). Class size typically runs around 40 students per semester. The class lecture is heavily orientated towards the basic biology of the diverse group of microorganisms (pathogens), examples of the diseases they cause and how they are managed. Mastering the class requires a significant amount of memorization, as most of the material is new to the student, as well as a completely new, scientific vocabulary. The class has been taught as a traditional two lecture / wk format with a one 2-hr, hands on laboratory / wk. This format allows little time for discussion or team projects. My goals of the redesign are to develop new means of engaging the students more, generating more in-depth discussion, and in helping them develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, without necessarily increasing the credit hours of the course, e.g. making it a 4 hr. course.

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    Gary McFall
    CS 235 - Introduction to Organizational Computing

    Gary teaches CS235 - Introduction to Organizational Computing in the College of Sciences. This course is mainly sophomores with about 420 students in Spring and 600 in Fall semesters. Gary has been teaching at Purdue since 2007 and at Ivy Tech for about 16 years. He has a BA and MA from Purdue in Technology.

     

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    Dr. David Meyer
    ECE 270 - Introduction to Digital System Design
    ECE 362 - Microprocessor Systems and Interfacing

    Dr. Meyer is a Murphy Award-winning professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He has developed the Digital Systems Design Course and Microprocessor Systems and Interfacing courses, providing over 200 students with advanced knowledge of computer engineering concepts. He also facilitates a laboratory with hands-on experience with microprocessor software application and interfaces.

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    Dr. Craig Miller
    CGT 163 - Graphical Communication and Spatial Visualization

    Dr. Miller will be teaching a re-designed pilot section of CGT 163; Graphical Communication and Spatial Visualization Fall Semester 2012 with an anticipated enrollment of 40 students. Lectures will be delivered online via distance learning methods, which students will watch outside of the classroom in order to take advantage of active-learning methodologies during the faculty facilitated applied laboratories. Students will work individually and in teams using problem-solving and critical thinking to solve problems through the use of technical graphics communication. The content of CGT 163 is industry centric problems and applications that require students to visualize alternative problem solutions and document their proposed solutions through the use of computer-aided design software (CAD) and traditional freehand pictorial and multiview drawings.

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    Dr. Eric Nauman
    ME 270 - Basic Mechanics I

    Dr. Nauman is an associate professor of mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, and basic medical sciences at Purdue University and has served as an EPICS instructor for five years. As an educator, he has quantified the positive effects of active learning, the ability of case studies to improve collateral learning, and is currently developing a continuous quality improvement model for teaching mechanics courses that is anticipated to ease faculty adoption of novel teaching techniques. Dr. Nauman participated in the NETI workshop and has continued developing novel examples and applications of basic mechanics that engage students and encourage them to incorporate concepts from a variety of fields. He demonstrated that global case studies can be used to improve students’ awareness and appreciation of other cultures and points of view. This work led to his participation in Purdue’s ENGAGE team where he has helped develop a course in visualization, and educational materials that integrate everyday examples, and active learning into basic mechanics courses.

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    Dr. Tim Newby
    EDCI 270 - Introduction to Educational Technology and Computing

    Dr. Newby is a professor in the College of Education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The course he is redesigning is EDCI 270 - Introduction to Educational Technology, currently with 200 students; the majority are undergraduate pre-service teachers, with 60% in elementary education. Tim is the winner of the Charles B. Murphy Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching and is a member of the Teaching Academy. He has authored 6 textbooks in the fields of educational technology and research.

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    Dr. Larry Nies
    CE 355 - Engineering Environmental Sustainability

    Dr. Nies will be teaching a redesigned CE 355 Engineering Environmental Sustainability. This course enrolls 100 students each fall and spring semester and will meet in the Hicks B848 Learning Studio. Students will work in teams on problems related to global-scale resource utilization, food, energy and commodity production while considering population dynamics and the associated ecosystem impacts. Gaining a global perspective and improving student’s information literacy skills are goals for this course. Facilitated group problem solving, discussion and presentations, educational game play, research writing and reflective writing are components of the redesigned course. Students will become active engaged learners and improve their ability to work and communicate within a team.

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    Dr. Dimitrios Peroulis
    ECE 201 - Linear Circuit Analysis I

    Dr. Peroulis is a Murphy Award-winning professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is currently redesigning Introductory Linear Circuit Analysis and is interested in increasing the interrogative knowledge and confidence of students enrolled in his courses. He will be utilizing technology and supplemental online materials to improve student mastery of core concepts and skills, in preparation for advanced coursework at Purdue.

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    Dr. Ann Rundell
    BME 390 - Professional Development and Design in Biomedical Engineering

    Dr. Rundell is an Associate Professor in the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University. She received her BS in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to graduate school, Ann worked for three years at Artel, Inc. in Windham, ME as an engineer designing small portable photometric instrumentation systems for the clinical and environmental marketplaces. Eventually Ann returned to school to earn her MS and PhD degrees from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. Her graduate research was on modeling and control of the immune system. Upon completion of her PhD she worked at MIT Lincoln Laboratory as a member of the Technical Staff for three years prior to joining academia as a faculty member. Her research interests apply systems and control theory to control cellular and physiological processes for developing and designing diagnostics and therapeutics. She is actively involved in curriculum design and employs pedagogical advances towards engineering education. She has co-authored more than 30 peer reviewed articles, is a senior member in IEEE, serves as a Section Editor for the Encyclopedia of Systems Biology, and received the NSF CAREER award.

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    Dr. Vicki Simpson
    NUR 108 - Introduction to Nursing

    Dr. Simpson is redesigning NUR 108: Introduction to Nursing one-credit hour course for fall semester 2012. Vicki is in the Nursing School. Her specialty is Public Health.

     

     

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    Dr. Sherry Slaven
    PHRM 820 - Professional Program Laboratories

    Dr. Slaven serves as the Director of Professional Program Laboratories for the College of Pharmacy. Prior to this position, she worked as a practicing pharmacist in a local community pharmacy. Dr. Slaven’s position is a newly formed position in the College of Pharmacy in response to the college’s new curriculum that will commence in the Fall 2012. She has been charged with redesigning the professional program laboratories, formerly known as the skills labs. This course occurs 6 semester of the Doctorate of Pharmacy program. Each course is composed of approximately 160 students in sections of 30 to 35 students who attend the lab weekly for 15 weeks. The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to practice the skills taught in the didactic courses while reinforcing content and applying basic sciences to the practice of pharmacy.

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    Dr. Janet Thorlton
    NUR 223 - Foundations of Research and EBP

    Dr. Thorlton is an Assistant Professor at Purdue University School of Nursing. Her research is focused on safe and efficacious use of performance enhancing substances in adolescents. She teaches Health Policy, Evidence Based Practice, Biostatistics, Pathophysiology, and Issues in Professional Nursing to undergraduate and graduate students. Prior to joining the faculty at Purdue University, Dr. Thorlton worked in a variety of healthcare settings, including Emergency Department and Post-Anesthesia Recovery. Her manuscript, entitled: Adolescent Performance Enhancing Substance Use: Regional Differences across the USA was recently accepted for publication in the Journal of Addictions Nursing. She holds a M.S. in Nursing Sciences, a post-Master’s Teaching Certificate, and a Ph.D. in Nursing from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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    Dr. Charles Woloshuk
    BTNY 301 - Introductory Plant Pathology

    Introductory plant pathology (BTNY 301) is a 3-hr lecture and laboratory course taught each semester, primarily as a service course for a number of agricultural majors. Three professors rotate in teaching the course (RD Martyn, S. Loesch-Fries and C. Woloshuk). Class size typically runs around 40 students per semester. The class lecture is heavily orientated towards the basic biology of the diverse group of microorganisms (pathogens), examples of the diseases they cause and how they are managed. Mastering the class requires a significant amount of memorization, as most of the material is new to the student, as well as a completely new, scientific vocabulary. The class has been taught as a traditional two lecture / wk format with a one 2-hr, hands on laboratory / wk. This format allows little time for discussion or team projects. My goals of the redesign are to develop new means of engaging the students more, generating more in-depth discussion, and in helping them develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, without necessarily increasing the credit hours of the course, e.g. making it a 4 hr. course.

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