Available HONR Courses

Honors College students will have the opportunity to enroll in interdisciplinary seminars, HONR courses, which are taught by top-notch faculty members who have been recognized for teaching excellence.

Below is a listing of the current semesters HONR course offerings. Click on the course name to view a description of the course. Click here to download a print-friendly PDF. Please note the HONR 199 courses are for first and second-year students only; HONR 299 and 399 courses are open to all high ability students.


Please Remember

Several schools/colleges offer honors sections of courses. Honors College students also may take honors sections of courses in order to fulfill honors diploma requirements.  Please click here for a listing of honors courses that are open to students of all majors.

HONR 19902: The Evolution of Ideas

Click here for more course information.

PLAY

“Evolution of Ideas: Play”

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: Varies by section

Brief Course Description:

Play – as psychologists and anthropologists have generally come to agree – helps humans develop cognitive strategies and physical behaviors, allowing them to succeed in their present environments and adapt to new ones. For quite a long time, though, play was seen as the mere buffoonery of children, replete as they are with surplus energy and nonsense. In this course, students will explore the evolution of “play,” including playthings and games, as it changed significantly over time and across a variety of disciplines. Students will, in charting the evolution of play, be participating in the forms of play and games under consideration.

The underlying mission of this course: to encourage students to “play with purpose” in their new, college environment – that is, to actively use this developmental setting for their own adaptive advances. In this effort, students will be asked to design unique forms of play that enhance the college experience and its role in cultivating human beings. Ultimately, students will actively (and playfully!) participate in the promotion of the course outcomes: the growth of collaborative, analytic, and interdisciplinary research skills.

water

“Evolution of Ideas: Water”

Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Brite
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: Varies by section

Brief Course Description:

On average, humans can survive nearly 8 weeks without food, but may die in a matter of days or even hours without access to water. This makes water perhaps the most critical element in human life, both from a biological perspective and in terms of our existence as social beings. In this class, we explore the evolution of water as central concept in the formation and regulation of human societies. We concentrate on two essential aspects of human-water systems. First we examine the relationship between water and power, and consider how human needs for water have shaped our systems of social organization. Second, we explore the concept of water cleanliness or “purity,” and explore how these ideas have impacted human-water landscapes through time. Insights derived from our explorations of water as power and purity will then be applied to study critical issues related to today’s global water crises.

The Nation

“Evolution of Ideas: The Nation”

Instructor: Dr. Anish Vanaik
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: Varies by section

Brief Course Description:

Ranking high among the phrases that are thrown about with casual (almost unthinking) ease must be the ones that imply that we are living through a ‘period of globalization’ and are ‘more interconnected than ever before’. Oddly enough, however, the same period which is supposed to have presaged the end of all parochialisms, has seen the emergence of ever more nation-states on the earth. Few people talk about the future being one of nation-states. Yet, as a species, we seem to singularly lack an alternative imagination of collective living. It is these paradoxes and the history that lies behind the nation – as ideal, as institution and as practice – that we will be exploring through this course. In unpacking this idea, we will range from the question of definitions to the nation’s symbolic affiliations, we will probe its imaginary underpinnings as well as its institutional foundations and finally, we will analyze its pattern of inclusions and exclusions. Along the way we will discover that reading and thinking about this enveloping, seemingly dated and yet remarkably resilient idea, necessarily engages a wide-range of our abilities and faculties.

Heroism

“Evolution of Ideas: Heroism”

Instructor: Dr. Diane Facinelli
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: Varies by section

Brief Course Description:

The terms hero and heroism pervade modern discourse, but what do those words indicate? Why is a hero in one culture a villain in another? Are the ideas of heroism and villainy gendered? This course examines the concepts of heroism and villainy as expressed in various time periods and cultures and includes the examination of works of fiction, biography, religion, psychology, philosophy, the visual arts, and film.

Terrorism

“Evolution of Ideas: Terrorism”

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: Varies by section

Brief Course Description:

This 8 week honors experience provides the intellectually curious the opportunity to evaluate key questions surrounding terrorism, including its interpretation and presentation in the media. We will examine a range of issues that relate to the threat terrorism and our responses to it. The course will start by exploring how terrorism is defined. We will also explore the origins of terrorism, ideologies and how it has evolved including changing goals and strategies of terrorists. Other questions include: are suicide terrorists irrational “crazies” or rational individuals; when do women get involved in terrorism; what is relationship between the media and how do governments respond to terrorism? By the end of the course, students will have a solid understanding of what is terrorism, its changing nature and causes.

HONR 199

Brain Disorders: Biological Basis, Treatability, Attitudes, and Public Policy

“Brain Disorders: Biological Basis, Treatability, Attitudes, and Public Policy”
HONR 19900, Section 001, CRN 20654

Instructor: Dr. Joseph Vanable
Professor Emeritus, Biological Sciences
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30 – 11:45
Room: REC 317

Brief Course Description:

Brain disorders are biologically-based illnesses that affect 8 in 100 of the population, and account for far more person-hours lost to disability than can be attributed to cancer, diabetes, or heart disease. They can be treated with more success than can heart disease (success rate for schizophrenia is 60%, major depression is 70%, and bipolar disorder is 80%, heart disease treatment success rate is 51%), yet there is a great deal of stigma directed towards these illnesses, and public policy is typically crafted as if it is not possible to have effective treatment for them, and funds expended in treating them should be minimized, because it is mistakenly thought that they are essentially wasted funds.

This course will examine these and other issues associated with brain disorders, by a combination of lectures, discussion, reading primary and secondary sources (but not text books), writing research reports, and presenting them. The sole prerequisite is to have an open and enquiring mind. The approach will combine biology, psychology, medicine, law, and public policy, beginning with the fundamentals, and building on these to develop a broad and reasonably deep interdisciplinary understanding of what the present status quo is, and how this might evolve in the future.

Science and Pseudoscience: An Adventure into Logical Thinking & Inquiry

“Science and Pseudoscience: An Adventure into Logical Thinking & Inquiry”
HONR 19900, Section 002, CRN 20655

Instructor: Dr. Alan York
Professor Emeritus, Entomology
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T-TH 12:00 – 1:15
Room: SMTH 201

Brief Course Description:

Daily we are barraged with information of an astounding nature: health claims, extra-terrestrial encounters, miracles, and nutrition and diet claims, to name a few. Newspapers, magazines, television “news”, and public speech present us with information that simply does not stand up to the rigor of scientific or logical examination. In this course, we will examine the basis of science and scientific thinking and the rigor and ethics that are a part of science, and apply this knowledge to many of the weird claims with which we are confronted daily. Through readings, video presentations, personal appearances, and discussion we will examine why people, educated and uneducated, make assumptions of fact that lead to belief in weird things. We will concentrate on using the precepts of science and scientific thinking to critically examine extraordinary “events”, paranormal events, and pseudoscience

Beyond Afghanistan

“Beyond Afghanistan”
HONR 19900, Section 007, CRN 15378

Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Brite
Honors faculty
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 3:00 – 4:15
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

The War in Afghanistan is now the longest running war in American history, lasting 13 years with roughly 38,000 U.S. personnel still on the ground as of the beginning of this year. This represents a monumental event of cultural engagement, and yet how much do we as American citizens really know about this far-off place and its people? Afghanistan and its Central Asian neighbors – Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Kirghizstan, western China – are distant, difficult to access places with foreign-sounding names and equally foreign peoples and customs. Yet they also make up a strategically important part of the world with a profound ability to affect our lives. This region is a geographic epicenter that sits between the world powers of Russia, China, Iran, and South Asia, providing a volatile conduit between the cultures of the West and those of the East. Numerous travelers, scholars, ambitious kings, and would-be rulers have recognized for millennia the importance of Afghanistan and Central Asia as the heart of the Eurasian landmass and have sought to control its cultural and material resources. In the modern age, these countries continue to impact our politics, our economy, and our worldview. In this course, we will learn more about Afghanistan and Central Asia through the study of its history and its people. The goal of the course is to build students’ general knowledge about the region, in order to provide a more sound foundation for understanding recent geopolitical events in this part of the world.

Interdisciplinary Writing: Decoding the Campus

“Interdisciplinary Writing: Decoding the Campus”
HONR 19903, Section 001, CRN 69810

Instructor: Dr. Diane Facinelli
Honors faculty
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 1:30 – 2:45
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

In this course, students will acquire the skills needed for successful writing throughout their academic and professional careers: a firm grasp on rhetoric and style, effective critical thinking, and strong research habits. We will foster these skills by demystifying and deciphering one of the most fascinating subjects in American culture: the college campus.

Like any inhabited place, Purdue’s campus has a complex ecology, and we will focus on this particular niche through a variety of lenses. Becoming acquainted with nature writing, urban studies, retail analysis, campus and civic planning, as well as anthropology, students will not only learn how to interrogate an object of inquiry from multiple perspectives but they will also have the opportunity to master a number of writing styles and research methods.

In addition to developing strong research and writing skills, students will spend much of this seminar-style course in lively discussions about their own habitat. In this way, students will work together to examine the various roles that the college campus plays in their development and to realize the agency we all have in shaping the environment that shapes ourselves.

This course *may* be used as a substitute for English 106 or 108. Consult your college advisor.

HONR 299

The Rise and Fall of the American Empire

“The Rise and Fall of the American Empire”
HONR 29900, Section 012, CRN 58217

Instructor: Dr. Steve Hallett
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: MWF 10:30 – 11:45
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

The major hot-button topics related to this course are taught in various departments and colleges throughout the university. Rarely, however, do we consider them together. As a result, engineers may develop a deep understanding of the oil industry without grasping the importance of global warming, and environmental scientists might study global warming without understanding the oil or coal industries. Likewise, agriculture students might discuss bio-fuels without understanding the economics of their implementation. Economists might recognize the impact of Chinese manufacturing on the global economy without recognizing its impact on the environment. This course, rather ambitiously, attempts to join the dots.

Another important goal of the course is to look at how the various global challenges will play out in different parts of the world. Overpopulation, for example, is a global problem, and yet the populations of most of the developed world are rather stable; the populations of Japan and Germany are shrinking. The political will to implement fuel efficiency standards and sources of renewable energy is strong in Europe, growing in the USA, and yet virtually non-existent in China and India. Global warming is likely to be disastrous in flood-prone Bangladesh, but may improve farming conditions in Canada.

We will take a trip through history, analyzing the relationships between human societies and their environment. We will discuss the emergence of farming and the early evolution of societies, and study the role of environmental exploitation in the demise of various civilizations. We will discuss the history of fossil fuels, the ways in which they have transformed the world, and the geopolitics of fossil fuel acquisition. Looking at the modern world, we will investigate the full range of growing global problems related to population, fossil fuel depletion, global warming, and food production. We will also analyze potential remedies, such as renewable energy (and nuclear energy). Importantly, we will discuss all these topics in the context of political and economic constraints. Perhaps the really important questions are not whether we can “save the world”, but rather whether we will

The McDonaldization of Society

“The McDonaldization of Society”
HONR 29900, Section 013, CRN 14944

Instructor: Dr. Mick La Lopa
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: WF 1:30 – 2:20
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

This course will be based on a concept known as McDonaldization, which is defined as the “process by which the principles of the fast-food restaurant – McDonald’s – are coming to dominate more and more sectors of American Society as well as the rest of the world.” Students will explore and discuss the dimensions of McDonaldization which are efficiency, calculability, predictability, and control to see how they apply to their lives and the lives of those around them in both positive and negative ways. The class is not about McDonald’s, per se, but it does embody the principles of McDonaldization! We will also discuss what, if anything could or should be done about it.

Hasbro Synergy Teams

“Hasbro Synergy Teams”
HONR 29900, Section 020, CRN 15903

Instructors: Dr. Steve Visser and Dr. Eric Nauman
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: M/W 2:30-5:20
Room: WILY C215A

Brief Course Description:

This is an interactive, project-based course sponsored by Hasbro Toys. Honors students will form interdisciplinary teams and learn to collaborate across majors, approaches, and skill sets, with the goal of producing new synergies and creating innovation not possible within a single discipline. Working in design studio, each team will develop new toy concepts leading to a working prototype. Students will prepare formal presentations and present their ideas to designers and marketing professionals at Hasbro. The course will be team taught by professors from Industrial Design (Prof. Steve Visser) and Mechanical Engineering (Dr. Eric Nauman).

Enrollment in this class is by invitation, in order to create the right mix of disciplines and skills. Students from every major are invited to apply. To apply: email honorscollege@purdue.edu with your name, major, level, and a short list of skills and/or qualities you would bring to the project. Subject heading: Hasbro Synergy Teams. Deadline: Friday, October 17, 2014.

Pirates!

“Pirates!”
HONR 29900, Section 014, CRN 14950

Instructor: Dr. Manushag Powell
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: : T/TH 12:00 – 1:15
Room: HEAV 206

Brief Course Description:

From the Ancient Greeks and the Vikings to the so-called “Golden Age” of the seventeenth century and beyond, pirates have been a global seafaring force to be reckoned with—and fodder for popular legends. This course will consider some of the historical documents and literary texts that inform our understanding of piracy. While reveling in pirate myth-making, we will nonetheless look thoughtfully at the economic and colonial revelations made possible by serious pirate study. Our focus will be on English and European pirate texts (the pirates themselves, of course, are “villains of all nations”), but we will also weigh the huge importance of the Barbary corsairs, of trade with and within the East, and the uneasy balance between English and Chinese naval power. "We will ask, and posit answers to: Where does the iconic pirate figure come from, and how does he move through history, print, and performance? What should we do with him now?"

Students will compose both short and longer research papers, as well as learn research skills by participating in an annotation project wherein they will arrange and footnote their own pirate histories, with a view not only to compiling explanatory data, but also to how they would like to teach their own particular theory of piracy to the hypothetical reader (i.e., it the act of piracy driven by labor rebellion, homo-social impulses, political anarchists, etc.?). By introducing pirates, both real and mythic, as having always been engaged in exploration, colonialism, and even experimental democracy, the course will encourage students to evaluate the many factors that comprise their own sense of what Mary Louise Pratt calls planetary consciousness, and to ponder the costs and benefits of attaching the self-image of the dashing adventurer to a history of economically and often murderously criminal actions.

Death & Dying

“Death & Dying ”
HONR 29900, Section 015, CRN 14951

Instructor: Dr. Heather Servaty-Seib
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30 – 11:45
Room: REC 103

Brief Course Description:

This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to the field of thanatology, while considering the profound influence of death and its associated psychological effects on human behavior. Death-related variables will be identified and evaluated as to their contributions to the development of individual differences across the life span. Readings will provide students with an empirical approach to the field, while journal assignments and in class activities will challenge students to examine their own thoughts, beliefs and feelings regarding issues of death and dying. Objectives: Students will be exposed to a wide variety of information, experiences, and perspectives so they may leave the course with a better appreciation of how death events and personal interpretations of them shape our lives as well as the lives of those with whom we work.

*provide students with a historical and cross-cultural foundation for understanding current Western conceptual views about death

*familiarize students with general models and themes in dying, death, and bereavement

*encourage critical thinking regarding the medical-legal-social-personal dilemmas encountered in death and dying

*foster an understanding of death as a developmentally natural aspect of the human experience

Technology & Culture

“Technology & Culture”
HONR 29900, Section 016, CRN 14952

Instructor: Dr. Ian Lindsay
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: : T/TH 1:30 – 2:45
Room: REC 317

Brief Course Description:

Since the Paleolithic, human societies have developed remarkable technological innovations, including agriculture (the Neolithic “Revolution”); the ability to transform clay, metal ore, and wool into finished products; as well as more recent developments in industrialization and cyber technologies. However, more than a reflection of our need to control the material world and make our lives easier, technology reflects and shapes our patterns of thinking and our notions of self and society. To what extent does the tail wag the dog?

This course considers the social and cultural dimensions of technology and the capacity for it to shape lives and identities. We will explore these issues from the perspective of ancient, modern, and “post-modern” society, illustrated with examples from the social sciences, biotechnology, reproductive medicine, engineering, and neurosciences. Themes will include the origins of particular technologies; technology as culture; cultural processes of technical development and dissemination; gender and the social organization of production; the politics and morality of everyday artifacts; communications technology; virtual identities; and technologies of the body.

The content of the course is designed to help students appreciate (via readings, lecture, films, and discussion) the origins and social consequences of technologies and artifacts that surround us in daily life, either personally or as part of broader social discourse. In addition to in-class discussion, the class will take periodic trips to sites around campus to examine the art and architecture of Purdue as they reflect prevailing attitudes about technology.

By the end of the semester students should have the tools to think critically about technology as a social process and to interrogate the inevitability of technological progress.

Freedom in America: From Selma to Ferguson

“Freedom in America: From Selma to Ferguson”
HONR 29900, Section 017, CRN 15215

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley
# of Credit Hours: 2
Days and Times: T/TH 9:00 – 10:15 (January 12 – March 29, 2015)
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

This course investigates the United States’ ongoing struggle to form a more perfect union. We will assess the meaning of freedom in the United States and evaluate whether all people are equal in American society. We will also examine the modern American civil rights era—which by most measures is the largest transformational period in recent history. Throughout the semester, we will survey the experiences of those impacted by issues that limit freedom (e.g., poverty, racism, the prison industrial system, gender inequality, undocumented status). Importantly, students have the opportunity to develop new ways that will foster freedom in America.

Students may (but are not required to) enroll in a linked spring-break course: “Freedom Ride” (below).

Freedom Ride

“Freedom Ride”
HONR 29900, Section 018, CRN 15216

Instructor: Dr. Dwaine Jengelley
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: SPRING BREAK, March 15-19, 2015

Brief Course Description:

Freedom Ride takes the classroom on the road. Traveling by bus, our mobile classroom will visit important sites of the American Civil Rights Movement in Georgia and Alabama during Spring Break 2015. Travel to Atlanta GA, Birmingham, Selma, and Montgomery, AL allows students to visit the major battlegrounds for justice in the American historical experience. While there, students will be able to reflect on the progress we have made as a country, but also question whether this transformational period of American history has successfully created freedom for all in the United States.

This is a domestic study tour during the week of Spring Break 2015. Additional fees will apply; approximate cost is $1142 per person.

The Human Redesign

“The Human Redesign”
HONR 29900, Section 019, CRN 15357

Instructor: Dr. Adam Watkins
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: MWF 10:30 - 11:20
Room: MTHW 304

Brief Course Description:

“The Human Redesign” refers to a scientific and cultural project wherein the concept of the human – including its physiological and mental design – was radically reimagined across the nineteenth-century. This project consisted, in large part, of advances in physiology, psychology, and evolutionary theory. Yet, equally significant was the role played by popular culture and arts. By exploring the collective effort to redesign the human, students will gain a more sophisticated understanding of how key concepts in society result from the cross-pollination of arts and sciences.

Thus, the reading and research in this course will vary widely. Students will read key literary texts – such as Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey,” George Eliot’s “The Lifted Veil,” and R. L. Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde – that drew from and contributed to preeminent theories by Charles Bell, Charles Darwin, and George Henry Lewes. While pride of place will be given to these literary and scientific masterpieces, students will also explore the quackery, pseudo-sciences, and technological advances that played their own important role in the communal effort to reimagine the human. Beyond assigned readings, students will complete small research projects on a chosen science or pseudo-science and their cultural network of influence and influences. For the culmination project, students have the chance to develop their own quack theory (in literary or scientific form) and argue for its influence on culture at large.

HONR 399

Visual Studies: Theory and Practice

“Visual Studies: Theory and Practice”
HONR 39900, Section 001 CRN 69750

Instructor: Dr. Christopher J. Lukasik
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: MW 4:30 – 5:45
Room: HEAV 129

Brief Course Description:

Ours is a predominantly visual culture. The ever-expanding array of new visual technologies and the practices of vision they generate influence how we see ourselves and our world, and how we think about seeing itself. With the visualization of knowledge more and more integral to the functioning of all advanced professional societies, the visual has been increasingly seen as the key to solving imperatives of speed and efficiency in “The Information Age” and images have become central to how humans connect to technology and to one another. Yet, most students enter and exit Purdue without even the most basic knowledge of the images that have come to play such a vital part of their daily experience. This course will change that by introducing students to the emerging field of visual studies. It will provide them with an overview of the basic theories, practices, and histories of the visual from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and historical periods from the physical mechanisms of sight (such as the anatomical structure of the eye and the neurological basis of vision in the brain) to the historical and social dimensions of seeing (such as theories of the gaze, spectacle, and surveillance). The course will be organized around a series of basic questions (such as what is an image? how do images produce meaning? what is vision?) whose responses have come to constitute the field of visual studies as well as its interdisciplinarity. Students will learn to understand how images and their viewers make meaning, to determine what role images play in our cultures, and to consider what it means to negotiate so many images in our daily lives. In short, the course will encourage students to approach critically the way we engage (and have engaged) the world in terms of what we see and what we want to see. Readings will be drawn from seminal works in visual theory, critical iconology, cultural semiotics, cultural theory, intermediality, art history, media studies as well as the psychology, philosophy, and science of vision. Course format will be lecture/discussion.

Invisible Hand

“Invisible Hand”
HONR 39900, Section 002 CRN 14953

Instructor: Dr. Michael Watts
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: : T/TH 1:30 – 2:45
Room: KRAN G0127

Brief Course Description:

Adam Smith was by no means the extreme advocate of laissez faire that he is often characterized as being – often by people who have never read Smith. But he did believe that in most competitive markets, in the “prudential” arena of economic affairs and behavior, self-interest would lead to widespread social benefits, with people acting in ways that provided social benefits as if they were led by an invisible hand. The operation of individual markets was fairly well understood before the Wealth of Nations was published; Smith’s economic genius, and his reputation even today, is based mainly on setting out the effects and often unrecognized advantages that arise in market systems, featuring an important but limited role for government.

In this course, after reading the Wealth of Nations, three different responses to Smith will be reviewed, featuring behavioral challenges to classical and neoclassical economics that originated from psychologists (most notably Kahneman and Tversky) and/or a range of evolutionary perspectives offered by Karl Marx, Joseph Schumpeter, and most recently by Robert Frank, particularly in his short 2011 book, The Darwin Economy. Oversimplifying (as I did already with my summary of Smith), Marx claimed capitalism will inevitably fall because of its failures; while Schumpeter (in Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy) predicted capitalism will fall because its successes lead to extensive social welfare programs and the erosion of traditional institutions, values, and social capital); and Frank argues that Smith’s invisible hand will come to be seen as a special case, with the general case including far more major Darwinian and behavioral-based outcomes in which what is good for the individual is bad for the species, often requiring government policy remedies. Frank goes on to predict that in a hundred years Darwin, not Smith, will be seen as the founding figure of modern economics.

Drains and Domes

“Drains and Domes”
HONR 39900, Section 003 CRN 14954

Instructor: Dr. Anish Vanaik
# of Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T/TH 10:30 – 11:45
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

The Roman, Like the Englishman who follows in his footsteps, brought to every new shore on which he set foot…only his cloacal obsession. He gazed about him in his togas and he said: It is meet to be here. Let us construct a water closet. - Professor MacHugh from James Joyce’s Ulysees

Colonial discourses and practices about architecture on the one hand and sanitation on the other were sometimes complementary. For instance, the symbolic weight of colonial architecture – to signify the grandeur and harmony of empire – was complemented by the ‘object lessons’ sanitary technology and discourse was designed to provide. On other counts, however, architecture and sanitation present stark contrasts. In terms of their economics, where grand Imperial projects like the construction of New Delhi had access to large and flexible budgets, municipal improvement in colonial cities was often intended to be done on the cheap.

Through this course we will explore the alternately complementary and contradictory aspects of architecture and sanitation within colonial society across a range of foci: the body, the public and the private, liberation movements, power and labor. What should emerge is a rich and materially grounded sense of the paradoxes and accepted truths of the social milieu generated by colonialism.

Scholar Development

“Scholar Development”
HONR 39900, Section 004 CRN 15902

Instructors: Dr. Rosanne Altstatt and Veronica Schirm
# of Credit Hours: 1
Days and Times: : W/F 9:30 – 10:20 Second 8 weeks; March 9 – May 2, 2015
Room: BRNG B254

Brief Course Description:

This course is designed to develop high achieving juniors, as interesting human beings, to being forward-thinking Scholars. The objective of the course is to be prepared for the life-changing experiences that national and international post-baccalaureate scholarships offer. The course will begin by reviewing a number of scholarships such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell, Churchill, Gates Cambridge Scholarships and Fulbright U.S. Student Grants. Students will be equipped to apply for the awards which best enable them to accomplish their educational and professional goals. The course will develop students’ writing skills in order to better compose essential parts of the scholarship application, including personal statements and project proposals. Additionally, students will have an opportunity to learn more about soliciting strong letters of recommendation and practice interviewing skills.

Students must contact Dr. Altstatt to obtain instructor permission to register for this course. altstatt@purdue.edu

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