Hari Bharadwaj

Research Interests / Training Areas:

  • Mechanisms of auditory scene analysis and selective attention
  • Human electrophysiology and functional neuroimaging
  • Systems neuroscience and computational modeling
  • Sensorineural hearing loss and central auditory processing disorders
  • Autism spectrum disorders


Hari Bharadwaj is an Assistant Professor at Purdue University with a joint appointment in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, and Biomedical Engineering. He received a B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, in 2006. He then received M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2008. In 2014, he completed a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Boston University with a dissertation on how the representation of sound information by the auditory nerve and brainstem, even among those with clinically “normal” hearing, could influence one’s ability to listen in challenging hearing conditions. Hari’s post-doctoral work at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital used neuroimaging techniques to study the cortical processing of complex sounds in school-aged children, including those with autism spectrum disorders. For this work, he received the Emerging Research Grant from the Hearing Health Foundation in 2015. In 2016, he joined the faculty at Purdue, where his lab integrates behavioral experiments, computational modeling, and an array of non-invasive physiological measurement tools to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying auditory perception in humans. Hari is a member of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology and the Acoustical Society of America.

Recent Publications:

Mehraei, G., Hickox, A. E., Bharadwaj, H. M., Goldberg, H., Verhulst, S., Liberman, M. C., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2016). Auditory brainstem response latency in noise as a marker of cochlear synaptopathy. J Neurosci, 36(13): 3755-3764.

Bharadwaj, H. M., Masud, S., Mehraei, G., Verhulst, S., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2015). Individual differences reveal correlates of hidden hearing deficits. J Neurosci, 35(5): 2161-2172.

Verhulst, S., Bharadwaj, H. M., Mehraei, G., Shera, C. A., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2015). Functional modeling of the human auditory brainstem response to broadband stimulation. J Acoust Soc Am, 138(3): 1637-1659.

Bharadwaj, H. M., Verhulst, S., Shaheen, L., Liberman, M. C., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2014). Cochlear neuropathy and the coding of supra-threshold sound. Front Syst Neurosci, 8: 26.

Bharadwaj, H. M., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2014). Rapid acquisition of auditory subcortical steady state responses using multichannel recordings. Clin Neurophysiol, 125(9): 1878-1888.

Ruggles, D., Bharadwaj, H. M., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2012). Why middle-aged listeners have trouble hearing in everyday settings. Curr Biol, 22(15): 1417-1422.

Ruggles, D., Bharadwaj, H. M., & Shinn-Cunningham, B. G. (2011). Normal hearing is not enough to guarantee robust encoding of suprathreshold features important in everyday communication. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 108(37): 15516-15521.

Michael Heinz

Assistant Professor

Lyles-Porter Hall, Room 3162
Phone: 765-496-2249 


Lyles-Porter Hall, Room 3061

Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, Lyles-Porter Hall, 715 Clinic Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2122, PH: (765) 494-3789

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