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Psychological Sciences Faculty

Thomas RedickThomas Redick

Assistant Professor, Cognitive

Mailing Address:
Department of Psychological Sciences
Purdue University
703 Third Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2081 USA

Campus Address:
Psychological Sciences, Room 3120

E-mail: tredick@purdue.edu
Telephone: (765) 494-5132
Website: Purdue Applied Cognition Lab

 

Degree: Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009

Research Interests:

Our lab’s main line of research examines the role that individual differences in working memory capacity play in relation to attention control, fluid intelligence, and multitasking. Recently, we’ve investigated whether higher-order cognition can be improved via brief cognitive training, along with evaluating the claims by other researchers and commercial programs that core competencies can be improved via working memory training. Also, we’ve done considerable work focusing on the valid and reliable measurement of individual differences in working memory capacity.

Recent Publications:

Redick, T. S., Calvo, A., Gay, C. E., & Engle, R. W. (2011). Working memory capacity and go/no-go task performance: Selective effects of updating, maintenance, and inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37, 308-324.

Mayers, L. B., Redick, T. S., Chiffriller, S. H., Simone, A. N., & Terraforte, K. R. (2011). Working memory capacity among collegiate student-athletes: Effect of sport-related head contacts, concussions and working memory demands. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 33, 532-537.

Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2011). Integrating working memory capacity and context-processing views of cognitive control. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64, 1048-1055.

Unsworth, N., Redick, T. S., Spillers, G. J., & Brewer, G. A. (2012). Variation in working memory capacity and cognitive control: Goal maintenance and micro-adjustments of control. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 326-355.

Mayers, L. B., & Redick, T. S. (2012). Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for post-concussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 34, 235-242.

Mayers, L. B., & Redick, T. S. (2012). Authors’ reply to “Response to ‘Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for post-concussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues’”. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 34, 435-442.

Redick, T. S., Broadway, J. M., Meier, M. E., Kuriakose, P. S., Unsworth, N., Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Measuring working memory capacity with automated complex span tasks. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 28, 164-171.

Shipstead, Z., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Is working memory training effective? Psychological Bulletin, 138, 628-654.

Shipstead, Z., Redick, T. S., Hicks, K. L., & Engle, R. W. (2012). The scope and control of attention as separate aspects of working memory. Memory, 20, 608-628.

Redick, T. S., Unsworth, N., Kelly, A. J., & Engle, R. W. (2012). Faster, smarter? Working memory capacity and perceptual speed in relation to fluid intelligence. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 24, 844-854.

Redick, T. S., Shipstead, Z., Harrison, T. L., Hicks, K. L., Fried, D. E., Hambrick, D. Z., Kane, M. J., & Engle, R. W. (2013). No evidence of intelligence improvement after working memory training: A randomized, placebo-controlled study. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142, 359-379.

Harrison, T. L., Shipstead, Z., Hicks, K. L., Hambrick, D. Z., Redick, T. S., & Engle, R. W. (in press). Working memory training may increase working memory capacity but not fluid intelligence. Psychological Science.

Redick, T. S., & Lindsey, D. R. B. (in press). Complex span and n-back measures of working memory: A meta-analysis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.