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Psychological Sciences Faculty

Terry DavidsonTerry Davidson

Emeritus Professor, Learning & Memory Area

Mailing Address:
Department of Psychological Sciences
Purdue University
703 Third Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2081 USA

 

E-mail: davidson@psych.purdue.edu

 


Degree: Ph.D. Purdue, 1981

Research Interests:

The research program employs learning, pharmacological, and physiological techniques to investigate the mechanisms underlying appetitive (e.g., hunger) and aversive (e.g., fear, stress) motivational systems.

Current interests focus on three questions: (1) What physiological events give rise to the internal stimulus consequences of motivational states? (2) How is learning about these internal stimuli involved in the control of behavior? (3) What mechanisms underlie learning about internal cues?

Recent Publications:

Davidson,T.L., Chan, K-H, Jarrard, L.E., Kanoski, S. E., Clegg, D.J. & Benoit, S.C. (2009). Contributions of the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex to energy and body weight regulation. Hippocampus, 19, 235-252.

 Swithers, S.E., Baker, C.R., & Davidson, T.L. (2009). General and persistent effects of high intensity sweeteners on body weight gain and caloric compensation in rats.  Behavioral Neuroscience, 123, 772-80.

Davidson, T.L., Kanoski, S.E., Chan, K-H., Clegg, D.J., Benoit, S. C., & Jarrard, L.E. (2010).  Hippocampal lesions impair retention of discriminative responding based on energy state cues. Behavioral Neuroscience, 124, 97-105.

Kanoski, S. E., & Davidson, T. L. (2010). Different patterns of memory impairments accompany short- and longer-term maintenance on a high-energy diet.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 36, 313-319.

Swithers, S. E., Martin, A. A., & Davidson, T. L. (2010). High-intensity sweeteners and energy balance. Physiology and Behavior, 100, 55-62.

Kanoski, S.E., Zhang, Y., Zheng, W., & Davidson, T.L. (2010).  The effects of a high-energy diet on hippocampal function and blood-brain barrier integrity in the rat.  Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 21, 207–19

Benoit, S.C., Davis, J.F., & Davidson, T. L. (2010) Learned and cognitive controls of food intake.  Brain Research,  1350, 71-76.

Swithers, S.E., Martin, A.A. Clark, K.M., Laboy, A.F., & Davidson, T.L. (2010). Body weight gain in rats consuming sweetened liquids: effects of caffeine and diet composition.  Appetite, 55, 528-533.

Davidson, T. L., Martin, A.A., Clark, K., & Swithers, S. E. (2011).  Intake of high-intensity sweeteners alters the ability of sweet taste to signal caloric consequences: implications for the learned control of energy and body weight regulation.  Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, in press.

Kanoski, S.E., & Davidson, T. L. (2011). Western diet consumption and cognitive impairment:  links to hippocampal dysfunction and obesity.  Physiology & Behavior ,103, 59–68.

Davidson, T. L., Martin, A.A., Clark, K., & Swithers, S. E. (2011).  Intake of high-intensity sweeteners alters the ability of sweet taste to signal caloric consequences: implications for the learned control of energy and body weight regulation.  Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64, 1430-41.

Jarrard, L.E., Luu, L. P., Davidson, T. L., (2011). A study of hippocampal structure-function relations along the septo-temporal axis. Hippocampus, in press.

Swithers, S.E. , Ogden, S.B., Davidson, T.L. (2011) Fat substitutes promote weight gain in rats consuming high-fat diets. Behavioral Neuroscience, in press.

Schier, L. A., Davidson, T. L., Powley, T. L. (2011) Ongoing ingestive behavior is rapidly suppressed by a preabsorptive, intestinal “bitter taste” cue.  American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, in press.