360˚ Review

From standout students to honored professors to faculty researchers on the cutting edge of discovery, the College of Health and Human Sciences (HHS) continued to make news in its sophomore year. Here are a few highlights from the 2011-12 academic year. For the latest, visit HHS online at WWW.PURDUE.EDU/HHS.

CONSUMER SCIENCES AND RETAILING

Leah Eber

With a flair for fashion and the ability to leap several meters through the air, Leah Eber, an apparel and design technology major, added two more Big Ten Championship long jump titles to her resume, taking home firsts in both the conference indoor and outdoor meets. The four-time champion (she defended both titles from 2011) and second-team All-American, Eber also put her clothing line on center stage at the spring Fashion Show. She graduated in May and hopes to pursue a career in professional track and field. www.purdue.edu/hhs/leaheber

HEALTH AND KINESIOLOGY

June marked the 40th anniversary of the Title IX legislation mandating that women and girls have equal opportunities in high school and college sports programs. Cheryl Cooky, assistant professor of health and kinesiology and women's studies, continues to explore how Title IX has made a place for women in sports and what changes are needed to truly level the playing field for female athletes. On the administrative front, Timothy Gavin became the department's new head on August 1, 2012.

HEALTH SCIENCES

The school announced the establishment of a 3+2 program, formally the "accelerated health care management degree program," which combines three years of health sciences curriculum and two years of Krannert business management study for an advanced business degree in health management. The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP) accredited a joint graduate program in medical physics with the School of Medicine at the Indiana University. The CAMPEP accreditation ensures that students are eligible for board certification upon graduation and helps foster research collaborations among participating faculty, clinicians and technologists across the disciplines at two premier higher learning institutions in Indiana.

HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT

Brad Neimeier

An innovative pizzeria is getting a leg up in the business world. Azzip Pizza, led by Brad Niemeier, a senior in hospitality and tourism management, won $20,000 as the top finisher in the Black Division of Purdue's 25th annual Burton D. Morgan Business Plan Competition. Neimeier delivered the winning presentation in February for his restaurant concept aimed at the fastest-expanding sector of the industry, fast-casual, where customers can choose their toppings while the pizza is being made.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

Four faculty members were honored for their teaching and research efforts. Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth, professor of human development and family studies, received one of the 2012 Morrill Awards, which recognize faculty who have excelled as teachers, researchers and scholars and in engagement missions. Daniel Mroczek was named the William and Sally Berner Hanley Professor of Gerontology. Shawn Whiteman, associate professor of human development and family studies, received the HHS Early Career Research Achievement Award. Doug Sprenkle, professor emeritus of marriage and family therapy, received the Award for Outstanding Contribution to Marriage and Family Therapy from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

NURSING

Karen Yehle, assistant professor of nursing, received an honorable mention in the Indianapolis Star's 10th annual Salute to Nurses. Honoring nurses and nurse educators from around the state who provide selfless service and dedication to their communities, the Salute to Nurses received more than 900 nominations. Nine individuals received awards.

NUTRITION SCIENCE

Connie Weaver, head and Distinguished Professor of Nutrition Science, received the Herbert Newby McCoy Award, the most prestigious research honor given at Purdue. Weaver was recognized for her work on calcium metabolism in adolescents and the impact of diet, gender, race and sexual maturity on calcium utilization. She is also a member of the Institute of Medicine, which is the health arm of the National Academies. Weaver also received the Linus Pauling Institute Prize for Health Research. Wayne Campbell, professor of nutrition science, won the college's Research Achievement Award.

PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCES

David Rollock

David Rollock, associate professor of psychological sciences, was named one of six 2012 Murphy Award winners at the Faculty Awards Convocation in April. Drawing on his extensive background as a licensed clinical psychologist, Rollock often leads in-class interviews with patients suffering from conditions such as eating disorders, autism, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Putting a human face on the disorders discussed in class helps students realize the magnitude of abnormal psychology, Rollock says. In other news on the faculty front, Robert Kail was named a Distinguished Professor of Psychological Sciences.

SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND HEARING SCIENCES

Students in a Purdue service-learning program developed an application for Apple's iPad that helps children with severe autism learn how to communicate. The app, called SPEAKall!, allows the children to construct sentences by choosing photos and graphic symbols. The app speaks the sentence, which allows a child to communicate a thought and also helps the child learn to talk. Launched on iTunes in November, the free app has been downloaded more than 3,300 times.

HHS EXTENSION

Extension educators received the Ann Hancook Award for excellence in educational program for Captain Cash, an initiative designed to deliver relevant and exciting financial education to third- and fourth-grade public school children throughout Indiana. According to a 2009 study by the Council on Economic Education, some 70 percent of youth from elementary grades to high school are not required to learn money management skills in the traditional classroom. With the mean amount of family credit card debt current at $7,300, financial literacy becomes paramount. Last year, more than 2,000 students interacted with Captain Cash in classrooms, significantly impacting attitudes toward financial behavior.

 

 

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