Joyce Lin, PhD

Research Interests

Parent perceptions and practices, risks and protective factors for child development, school readiness indicators, the role of culture and poverty on parenting and child development

Education

  • 2016- Ph.D., Education, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California

  • 2014- M.A., Education, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California

  • 2011- B.A. Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

Biography

I finished my B.A. in Sociology and minor in Education Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2011. During my time at UCLA, I worked in an autism research and treatment lab and became interested in intervention work and understanding risk and protective factors for child well-being. Thus, I went on to pursue my M.A. and Ph.D. in Education at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). My research at UCI focused on environmental and contextual influences, such as culture and poverty, on parenting and what implications these have for child development. I sought to identify various factors that might support or hinder child development (e.g., parent self-efficacy, neighborhood disorder, feelings during pregnancy, etc.), in hopes of informing prevention and intervention programs that promote optimal child outcomes. My graduate studies culminated in my dissertation, which was a cross-cultural, mixed-methods study exploring how cultural values, beliefs, and caregiver experiences may be risky for or protective against physical punishment use. After completing my doctoral degree in 2016, I worked as a lecturer for the School of Education at UCI, and for the Department of Child and Adolescent Studies at the California State University, Fullerton (CSUF).

In August 2017, I began working with Dr. David Purpura (PI) as a postdoctoral researcher on the State of Indiana and Early Learning Indiana funded Indiana Standards Tool for Alternate Reporting of Kindergarten Readiness (ISTAR-KR) Enhancement Project. For this project, we will conduct a content review for the measure to ensure alignment with the state’s 2015 foundations, identify gaps in the assessment, test reliability and validity of the assessment, and increase its usability for teachers and parents. I am interested in understanding how parents’ perceptions and behaviors may support or hinder their children’s school readiness outcomes (e.g., socioemotional, academic) and how SES and culture might play a role in this relationship.

Publications

*indicates mentored undergraduate student

  • McManus, M.*, Khalessi, A.*, Lin, J., Ashraf, J.*, & Reich, S. M. (2017). Connecting positive feelings during pregnancy with early feeding practices and infant health. Pediatrics International, 0, 1-7. 10.1111/ped.13209

  • Lin, J., & Reich, S. M. (2016). Mothers’ perceptions of neighborhood disorder are associated with children’s home environment quality. Journal of Community Psychology, 44(6), 714-728. 10.1002/jcop.21796

  • Lin, J., Reich, S. M., Kataoka, S., & Farkas, G. (2015). Maternal reading self-efficacy associated with perceived barriers to reading. Child Development Research. http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/218984

Selected Presentations

  • Lin, J. (2017, August). Links to physical punishment for three generations of Taiwanese-origin mothers. Paper presentation accepted as part of a symposium titled How review of research on corporal punishment can influence policy decisions to the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.  

  • Lin, J. (2017, April). Stronger caregiver machismo attitudes linked to greater likelihood of physical punishment use in a diverse sample. Poster presentation accepted to the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Austin, TX. 

  • Lin, J. (2015, June). Are mothers’ perceptions of neighborhood disorder negatively associated with children’s home environment quality? Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, MA.

  • Lin, J. (2015, June). Are immigrants’ social supports a protector or risk for parental physical aggression against children? Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, MA.

  • Lin, J., Reich, S. M., Kataoka, S., & Farkas, G. (2013, April). Maternal reading self-efficacy is linked to lower perceived barriers to reading. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

Joyce Lin
Postdoctoral Researcher

(PhD, University of California-Irvine)

Hanley Hall, Room 325B
Purdue University
1200 West State St.
West Lafayette, Indiana  47907-2055

Phone: 765-494-2932
Fax: 765-494-1144
lin947@purdue.edu

Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-4600

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