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Pulse in the news

Medical entomologist: 'Game of Thrones' offers parallels to new global era of infectious disease

September 27, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Infectious diseases and the insects that transmit them have been powerful forces in shaping human history and evolution. The writings of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans tell of mosquito-borne illnesses; plagues of epic proportions wiped out half the population of Europe in the Middle Ages; and waves of dengue, yellow fever and malaria shaped the United States. Click here to read more.


Purdue researchers discover signaling cascade that drives fatty tumors

September 01, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A common cell signaling pathway that controls differentiation of stem cells may also control the formation of tumor cells in fat, according to a Purdue University study. This signaling pathway, called Notch signaling, has been widely reported to determine the identity and control the differentiation of a variety of stem cells in different tissues. Notch signaling occurs between two neighboring cells, in which one cell sends a signal to the neighbor cell to control its gene transcription program that determines the identity of the neighbor cell. Stem cells are basically blank slates, waiting to become a particular, differentiated type of cell. In fat cells, that differentiation is controlled by a regular pattern of Notch signaling. Aberrant suppression or activation of Notch signaling may disrupt the normal differentiation process and maintenance of stem cells. Click here to read more.


Purdue research may expand engineered T-cell cancer treatment

April 20, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University researchers may have figured out a way to call off a cancer cell assassin that sometimes goes rogue and assign it a larger tumor-specific "hit list." T cells are the immune system's natural defense against cancer and other harmful entities in the human body. However, the cells must be activated and taught by the immune system to recognize cancer cells in order to seek out and destroy them. Unfortunately, many types of cancer manage to thwart this process. Click here to read more.


Meerut girl part of US team that cracked Zika structure

April 06, 2016

MEERUT: Devika Sirohi, 29, a doctoral student at Purdue University in the United States, is the youngest member of a team of seven researchers which has, for the first time, determined the structure of the Zika virus. The breakthrough is revealing insights crucial for the development of effective treatments for the deadly Click here to read more.


Researchers reveal Zika virus structure, a critical advance in the development of treatments

April 04, 2016

A team led by Purdue University researchers is the first to determine the structure of the Zika virus, which reveals insights critical to the development of effective antiviral treatments and vaccines. Click here to read more.


Zika virus research shared around the world

April 01, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Nearly 300 media outlets around the world carried news of the discovery of the Zika virus structure by Purdue’s structural biology team. An event in Hockmeyer Hall of Structural Biology, where the research team performs its work, drew a large number of media outlets and others excited to share in the news of the discovery. Two Indianapolis television news teams stayed well after the 2 p.m. event to provide live coverage during their evening newscasts. Click here to read more.


Researchers reveal Zika virus structure, a critical advance in the development of treatments

March 31, 2016

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — A team led by Purdue University researchers is the first to determine the structure of the Zika virus, which reveals insights critical to the development of effective antiviral treatments and vaccines. Click here to read more.


3 Purdue professors to be named AIMBE fellows

March 28, 2016

Three Purdue University professors will be inducted in April as fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. The organization will recognize Pedro Irazoqui, a professor of biomedical engineering and electrical and computer engineering, associate head of the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and director of the Center for Implantable Devices; Zheng Ouyang, a professor of biomedical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and chemistry; and Ann Rundell, a professor of biomedical engineering and electrical and computer engineering. Click here to read more.


Fingerprinting the Brain

February 26, 2016

Zhongming Liu integrates imaging techniques for ambitious projects mapping neural networks. Our fingerprints identify us, and that’s about all they can do. Zhongming Liu gathers far more useful kinds of fingerprints — maps of neural circuitry and activity in our brains, which will truly characterize us and help us understand and treat mental illness and neurological disorders. Click here to read more.


Life science use of Purdue’s research supercomputers experiencing significant growth

February 05, 2016

Purdue's growing battery of life science research initiatives are showing up in the use of the University's research supercomputers, with significant growth in life science users, particularly of the new Snyder cluster, a supercomputer geared to life science-oriented computation. Click here to read more.


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