Interdisciplinary Life Science - PULSe Great research is a matter of choice

Chris Staiger

Chris Staiger Profile Picture
Professor of Biological Sciences
Ph.D., California-Berkeley, 1990

Contact Info:
staiger@purdue.edu
765-496-1769

Training Group(s):
Biomolecular Structure and Biophysics


Current Research Interests:

The microtubule and microfilament cytoskeleton is essential for many dynamic cellular process including: cell division, cytoplasmic streaming, cellular architecture and morphogenesis. The ultimate goal for our research is to analyze the regulatory and structural molecules associated with these cytoskeletal elements and to discover how these contribute to plant development. We have developed two complementary strategies for identifying and characterizing the components necessary for cell division and morphogenesis. The first, a cytological and molecular genetic analysis of cell division, makes use of a large collection of maize meiotic mutants. The second approach is to isolate actin-associated proteins using molecular and biochemical techniques, to characterize their function in vitro, and to use these as probes to dissect cytoskeletal function in living plant cells.



Selected Publications:

Huang, S., L. Blanchoin, F. Chaudhry, V.E. Franklin-Tong, and C.J. Staiger. 2004. A gelsolin-like protein from Papaver rhoeas pollen (PrABP80) stimulates calcium-regulated severing and depolymerization of actin filaments. J. Biol. Chem., 279: 23364-23375

Huang, S., R.C. Robinson, L.Y. Gao, T. Matsumoto, A. Brunet, L. Blanchoin, and C.J. Staiger. 2005. Arabidopsis VILLIN1 generates actin filament cables that are resistant to depolymerization. Plant Cell 17: 486-501

Michelot, A., C. Guérin, S. Huang, M. Ingouff, S. Richard, N. Rodiuc, C.J. Staiger, and L. Blanchoin. 2005. The formin homology 1 domain modulates the actin nucleation and bundling activity of Arabidopsis FORMIN1. Plant Cell 17: 2296-2313

Huang, S., L. Gao, L. Blanchoin, and C.J. Staiger. 2006. Heterodimeric capping protein from Arabidopsis is regulated by phosphatidic acid. Molecular Biology of the Cell, in press

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