Table of Contents

Welcome to Visions of Discovery

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Discovery Park is the heart of large-scale interdisciplinary research and innovation at Purdue, building on the university's strengths in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. With the launch of this electronic viewbook, Visions of Discovery, we are highlighting the mission of Discovery Park and its impact in bringing research to life.

Visions of Discovery is presented in a digital storybook format with primary chapters focused on Discovery, Delivery, Engagement and Partnerships. We also provide detailed contact information depending on your particular vantage point.

We hope this will be a beneficial introduction to what Purdue is accomplishing through Discovery Park — whether you’re a student or a faculty member at Purdue or another academic institution; a corporation or foundation seeking research collaboration; or an economic development official or visitor interested in touring our state-of-the-art laboratories equipped with some of the most sophisticated equipment and instrumentation on a public university campus anywhere.

In less than a decade, Discovery Park has grown into a $500 million hub of research activity. Through Discovery Park, Purdue is laying a foundation to address the challenges of discovery and research for the 21st century — issues such as health care, the environment, cancer, energy, life sciences, nanotechnology, cyber infrastructure, STEM education and climate change.

Welcome to Visions of Discovery
We hope you enjoy your visit

Discovery Park at a Glance

Transforming the scientific vision of today into the reality of tomorrow

Initiated > 2001
Buildings, equipment, and grants > a $500 million enterprise
Equipment added to date > $27 million
Laboratory space added to date > 113,000 square feet
Office, meeting space added to date > 93,000 square feet
Economic Impact > $70.5 million in sponsored research funding in 2008-09, $77 million in research funding through first six months of 2009-10; $205 million in private donations invested in facilities through March 2010.

Unique Features

Discovery Park facilities are shared. Faculty members do not own space or equipment. Highly collaborative, interdisciplinary projects are connected throughout Purdue and to Purdue Research Parks. Technology commercialization is facilitated through the Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship and the university's strong partnership with the Purdue Research Park. Discovery Park also provides the space for Purdue's Alfred Mann Institute for Biomedical Development. The $25 million, four-story facility, Hall for Discovery and Learning Research, housing the Discovery Learning Research Center and related research programs opened in 2009. A new expansion will add nearly 30,000 square feet of new research space to the Bindley Bioscience Center.

Explore Purdue's unique interdisciplinary facilities, cutting-edge equipment, and shared spaces for collaborative projects in life and health sciences; energy, climate change and the environment; information technology, defense and space; science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning; and other areas.

Facilities in the park attract researchers and students from all 10 West Lafayette colleges, Purdue's regional campuses, Purdue Technology Centers throughout Indiana, Indiana University and the Indiana University School of Medicine, and international institutions from South Korea, Australia and China to Uganda, India and Azerbaijan.

Discovery Park Facilities

Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship

Opened: 2004
Cost: $7 million

Major Funding: Burton D. Morgan Foundation.

Space: 31,000 square feet for classrooms, computer labs, and conference space.

Programs: Burton D. Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, and Oncological Sciences Center are housed here. This facility also provides space for the Center for Regional Development and the Small Business Development Office. The building offers central meeting places for workshops, seminars, and classes and works in conjunction with all Discovery Park centers and the Purdue Research Park.

Unique Features: This facility is home to four pieces of artwork by Frederic Remington, donated by Don M. Newman. The sculpture in the front hall is titled The Stampede. Other Remingtons in the building are Coming Through the Rye, The Outlaw, and Polo. The café area is home to original artwork by Jim Davis titled Garfield. Light Bulb, a painting by Salvador Dalí, is on the second floor. The facility also won the Boston Society of Architects’ 2005 Design Excellence Honor Award.

Gerald D. and Edna E. Mann Hall

Opened: 2007
Cost: $12.4 million

Major Funding: Gerald D. and Edna E. Mann.

Space: 20,000 square feet of office and research space.

Programs: Facility is home to Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Healthcare Technical Assistance Program, and Purdue Homeland Security Institute. Facility also houses Purdue’s Global Sustainability efforts, which includes Purdue’s Energy Center, Center for the Environment, and Purdue Climate Change Research Center. Effort will lead research in biofuels, solar, wind, clean coal, nuclear, batteries, water, and hydrogen, as well as biodiversity, climate change, the carbon cycle, hydroclimatology, and weather extremes. Energy Center efforts include Purdue’s Green Building Initiative, Center for Coal Technology Research, and Advanced Ground-Vehicle Power project. Center for Environment leads Species Naming and Conservation Initiative, Sensory Landscapes and Intelligent Monitoring (SLIM) project, and Living Laboratory on the Wabash River (LLOW) preservation project.

Unique Features: Building's architect and interior designer are from first women-owned firm to design Purdue facility. Design features include flexible layout for new projects, and contemporary, open spaces to foster interdisciplinary collaboration. Mann Hall has videoconference and electronic capabilities in conference and meeting rooms.

Hall for Discovery and Learning Research

Opened: 2009
Cost: $25 million

Major Funding: Susan Bulkeley Butler, Sally and Ken Mason, Jerry and Rosie Semler.

Space: More than 80,000 square feet of usable space over four stories.

Programs: Building is home to the Discovery Learning Research Center, which focuses on a state-of-the-art learning, science, and project laboratory. Experts in academia, industry, and K-12 education converge to perform educational research and innovation to revolutionize discipline learning in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math. Center organizes undergraduate student research internships. Facility houses offices for Susan Bulkeley Butler Purdue Center of Leadership Excellence and Discovery Park’s P-12 STEM education program. Building also is home to Mann Institute for Biomedical Development, which is commercializing Purdue’s innovative biomedical technologies.

Unique Features: Flexible experimental learning environments foster multidisciplinary research collaboration. Large learning research space accommodates 100 seats; smaller research spaces seat up to 36 students. Cameras, microphones, projection screens, TV monitors, and lights can be mounted on an open grid, programmable-ceiling structure. Large science and project labs provide research environments to support wet and dry labs and technology-intensive learning. Facility supports large- and small-group learning. Instrumentation lab, administered by Purdue’s Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development (CAID), provides learning in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and combating chemical and biological terrorism.

Bindley Bioscience Center

Opened: 2005
Cost: $15 million

Major Funding:: William E. Bindley.

Space: 29,000 square feet, including 18,000 square feet of lab space to facilitate research activity of multiple life sciences teams in parallel. Laboratories are organized by function rather than by projects. Facility offers six large, open, and flexible laboratories with four core research capabilities: biomolecular technologies; computational life sciences and informatics; bionanotechnology; and cytomics and imaging.

Programs: Bindley houses National Institutes of Health-funded research center that’s exploring proteomics for cancer biomarkers and a Department of Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC). Research core activity in metabolomics, proteomics, and cytomics supports dozens of academic and corporate projects. An integrated screening laboratory combines diverse technologies for robotic and automated analyses of drug-like compounds, microbial diversity, and biomolecular interactions. Physiological sensing facility develops and implements innovative multimodal sensors in biological systems. Bindley’s Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development, supported by National Science Foundation, Transportation Security Administration and NIH, is developing next generations of research instrumentation. A new expansion will add nearly 30,000 square feet of new research space to the Bindley Bioscience Center.

Unique Features: Center’s equipment, technology, state-of-the-art labs and research expertise have sparked life science and bioscience research collaborations with state, regional, national and international industry partners. Skywalk connecting Bindley to Birck Nanotechnology Center facilitates inter-center bionanotechnology research.

Birck Nanotechnology Center

Opened: 2005
Cost: $58 million

Major Funding: Michael J. and Katherine R. (Kay) Birck, Don and Carol Scifres, William B. and Mary Jane Elmore, and Kevin G. Hall.

Space: 187,000 square feet, including 25,000 square feet of a class 1-10-100 nanofabrication cleanroom, the Scifres Nanofabrication Laboratory, part of which is configured as a biological/pharmaceutical cleanroom to facilitate bionanotechnology research in collaboration with Bindley Bioscience Center. Birck includes 22,000 square feet of lab space to support research by resident and nonresident users. Surface analysis facility provides analytical services for research in a central lab or production setting. Facility includes nanotech labs to support and facilitate technology transfer and entrepreneurship.

Programs: Birck is home to National Nuclear Security Administration’s Center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability or Microsystems [PRISM], and Network for Computational Nanotechnology [NCN] as well as its nanoHUB Web site, funded by the National Science Foundation [NSF]. Birck provides capabilities in nanoscale metrology; materials growth and deposition; nanoelectronics and microelectronics; microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems; energy conversion; nanofabrication; electronic characterization; nanophotonics; bionanotechnology; nanochemistry; and theory and computation.

Unique Features: Birck provides lab space to industry partners and companies interested in collaboration. Center includes research-teaching laboratory in Scifres Nanofabrication Laboratory for advanced undergraduate students. Controlled Environments Magazine honored Birck with Facility of the Year award in 2007.

Discovery Park News

Since its launch in 2001, Discovery Park has provided a platform for driving Purdue's pursuit of funding for large-scale interdisciplinary research projects. Here is a list of success stories through Discovery Park that demonstrate how teamwork on a university campus is making a difference in the world of discovery:

Purdue professor assists team in researching size of Gulf oil spill

A team of scientists and engineers, including Purdue University mechanical engineering professor Steven Wereley, released figures Thursday (May 27) showing that at least 12,000-19,000 barrels of oil are flowing daily into the Gulf of Mexico in the aftermath of an April 20 oil rig explosion.

That means the BP PLC oil spill off the coast of Louisiana has already surpassed the Exxon Valdez as the worst in U.S. history, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Using the most conservative estimate, 450,000 barrels of oil, or 19 million gallons, have leaked into the Gulf since the accident that sank the Deepwater Horizon oil rig five weeks ago, the USGS reports. Under the higher estimate, more than 700,000 barrels of oil, or 29 million gallons, may have spilled to date.

Learn More

Ultrasensitive imaging method uses gold-silver 'nanocages'

New research findings suggest that an experimental ultrasensitive medical imaging technique that uses a pulsed laser and tiny metallic "nanocages" might enable both the early detection and treatment of disease.

The system works by shining near-infrared laser pulses through the skin to detect hollow nanocages and solid nanoparticles - made of an alloy of gold and silver - that are injected into the bloodstream.

Unlike previous approaches using tiny metallic nanorods and nanospheres, the new technique does not cause heat damage to tissue being imaged. Another advantage is that it does not produce a background "auto fluorescent" glow of surrounding tissues, which interferes with the imaging and reduces contrast and brightness, said Ji-Xin Cheng (pronounced Gee-Shin), an associate professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry at Purdue University.

Learn More

Purdue to find game changing way to produce biofuels

The U.S. Department of Energy is funding a $20 million effort to create an Energy Frontier Research Center to advance work in biofuels at Purdue. The Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels, known as C3Bio and led by Purdue biology professor Maureen McCann, is investigating methods to bypass current processes involving biological fermentation, reducing the need for large and expensive biorefineries and expanding the range of biofuels beyond ethanol. The Department of Energy also chose Purdue's project as one of 16 that will be funded by President Obama's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The project will create at least 20 new jobs for students, postdoctoral researchers and professional staff in Indiana and another eight jobs at partner institutions.

Learn More

GlucaGo, Currently Cultured win Purdue elevator pitch competition

A medical device concept for diabetics and an Internet-based global etiquette and information service took top honors Friday (April 2) at the fourth annual Purdue University Elevator Pitch Competition in Discovery Park.

GlucaGo LLC's Rush Bartlett won the open division and the $1,000 top prize for his two-minute pitch about developing an emergency kit that automatically mixes and injects medication for diabetics. Preston Holb was first, also capturing $1,000 for his Currently Cultured business concept in the undergraduate student division.

Tying for second in the open division were Sean Connell of Biognostic LLC, a developer of a biosensor for quickly detecting upper respiratory infections, and Rich Mussman, whose West Lafayette company Nano-Rad LLC is developing an innovative breast cancer radiation therapy process. Each won $375 for their pitches.

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'Microrings' could nix wires for communications in homes, offices

Purdue University researchers have developed a miniature device capable of converting ultrafast laser pulses into bursts of radio-frequency signals, a step toward making wires obsolete for communications in the homes and offices of the future.

Such an advance could enable all communications, from high-definition television broadcasts to secure computer connections, to be transmitted from a single base station, said Minghao Qi, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering.

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Grad Students Help Advance Fish Monitoring Project for Native Alaskan Villages

Two Purdue graduate students have developed sampling kits and educational materials for three Native Alaskan villages as part of an interdisciplinary partnership between Purdue faculty and the Alaska Native Youth Institute. Leila Nyberg (Civil Engineering/Ecological Sciences and Engineering) and Laurel Royer (Agronomy) became involved with the project in February 2008. Dr. Krista Nichols (Biological Sciences & Forestry and Natural Resources) and Dr. Marisol Sepulveda (Forestry and Natural Resources) have been working with Native Alaskans for 3 years, facilitated by Dr. Mike Smolen (Alaska Native Youth Institute) and Purdue University Center for the Environment.

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Indiana life-sciences firm signs deal to use research space at Purdue's Birck Nanotechnology Center

An Indiana medical-device company has signed a research agreement through the Purdue Research Foundation to use laboratories and equipment at Purdue University's Birck Nanotechnology Center, officials announced Thursday (July 16).

Nanovis Inc., a Columbia City, Ind.-based company with offices at the Purdue Research Park in West Lafayette, will work with Birck researchers and the center's facilities to improve the interactive process between medical implants and human tissues for reducing rejection or infection.

"This industry partnership opens the door at the Birck Nanotechnology Center for enhanced opportunities for joint research with industry partners," said Timothy Sands, the Mary Jo and Robert L. Kirk Director of the Birck Nanotechnology Center.

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Purdue 'nanoHUB' tops 100,000 annual users, popularity growing

An interactive Web site called nanoHUB.org, which makes available scientific simulations, seminars, interactive courses and other specialized nanotech-related materials, has reached a milestone: 100,000 users in one year.

Researchers and educators from New York to London and Moscow to Madrid are logging onto nanoHUB.org because it offers a wide range of nanotech-related content.

"Attracting 100,000 users in a single year demonstrates the practical utility of nanoHUB," said Gerhard Klimeck, director of the Network for Computational Nanotechnology and a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University. "Growing popularity has been directly tied to the dramatic improvement of user interfaces and content that cannot be found anywhere else."

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New aluminum-water rocket propellant promising for future space missions

Researchers are developing a new type of rocket propellant made of a frozen mixture of water and "nanoscale aluminum" powder that is more environmentally friendly than conventional propellants and could be manufactured on the moon, Mars and other water-bearing bodies.

The aluminum-ice, or ALICE, propellant might be used to launch rockets into orbit and for long-distance space missions and also to generate hydrogen for fuel cells, said Steven Son, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University.

Purdue is working with NASA, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Pennsylvania State University to develop ALICE, which was used earlier this year to launch a 9-foot-tall rocket. The vehicle reached an altitude of 1,300 feet over Purdue's Scholer farms, about 10 miles from campus.

Learn More

Contact Information By Audience

Contact information at the end of each chapter has been created to direct our audience - students, faculty, partners, and visitors - in their efforts to connect with the right person to discuss areas of potential involvement in Discovery Park activities. Related Web sites link visitors to programs at Discovery Park.


The next 8 pages contain contact information.
Please select your next chapter or audience type to continue...

Contact Information for Students Contact Information for Faculty Contact Information for Partners Contact Information for Visitors

Select Your Next Chapter

Overview

The Overview chapter offers a glimpse at the unique features, the latest news, building locations and contact information for Discovery Park.

Discovery

Learn about how research has been reinvented at Discovery Park, how collaborations among scientists and stakeholders are seeking solutions to grand challenges, and the impacts of discovery.

Delivery

Discovery Park is delivering on Purdue's land-grant mission to serve the people of Indiana and the nation. Large-scale research drives economic development in a knowledge economy and Discovery Park is the engine.

Engagement

Activities at Discovery Park transform people's lives. Undergraduates gain hands-on research experience, business plan competitions nurture a new generation of entrepreneurs, and innovative diagnostic tools detect early stages of disease.

Partnerships

To meet today's grand challenges, a spectrum of partnerships are forming at Discovery Park -- international partners, partnerships with foundations, institutions and industry all contribute to advancing learning and research.

Contact Information for Students

Discovery

Contact Information for Students

  Amy Childress Project Coordinator for Student and International Programs Phone  
  Monica Shively Intern Coordinator Phone  
  Discovery Learning Research Center Phone  

Partnerships

Contact Information for Students

  Cindy Ream Engagement Operations Manager Phone  
  Pankaj Sharma Associate Director, Operations & International Affairs Phone  

Delivery

Contact Information for Students

  Jackie Lanter Administrative Assistant Phone  
  Amy Childress Project Coordinator for Student and International Programs Phone  

Engagement

Contact Information for Students

  Rita Baker Coordinating Academic Advisor Phone  
  Jackie Lanter Administrative Assistant Phone  
  Entrepreneurship Certificate Program Phone  

Contact Information for Faculty

Discovery

Contact Information for Faculty

  Marietta Harrison Associate VPR, Director of Oncological Sciences Center Phone  
  Candiss Vibbert Associate Director for Discovery Park Engagement Phone  

Partnerships

Contact Information for Faculty

  Mary Jo Bartolacci Associate Director, Corporate & Foundation Development, OVPR Phone  
  Marietta Harrison Associate VPR, Director of Oncological Sciences Center Phone  
  Pankaj Sharma Associate Director, Operations & International Affairs Phone  

Delivery

Contact Information for Faculty

  Julie Goonewardene Director of Entrepreneurship College of Engineering Phone  
  Tim Peoples Director, Purdue Technology Centers Phone  
  Elizabeth Hart-Wells Assistant Vice President and Director of the Purdue Research Foundation, Office of Technology Commercialization Phone  

Engagement

Contact Information for Faculty

  Dave Kotterman Managing Director, Launching Centers and Institutes Phone    
  Willie Burgess Managing Director, Discovery Learning Research Center Phone Web  
  Steve Mogensen Managing Director, Purdue Alfred Mann Institute Phone Web  

Contact Information for Partners

Discovery

Contact Information for Partners

  Candiss Vibbert Associate Director for Discovery Park Engagement Phone  
  Marietta Harrison Associate VPR, Director of Oncological Sciences Center Phone  

Partnerships

Contact Information for Partners

  Pankaj Sharma Associate Director, Operations & International Affairs Phone  
  John Schneider Assistant Vice President for Industry Research Phone  
  Vic Lechtenberg Vice Provost for Engagement Phone  
  Candiss Vibbert Associate Director for Discovery Park Engagement Phone  

Delivery

Contact Information for Partners

  Julie Goonewardene Director of Entrepreneurship College of Engineering Phone  
  Tim Peoples Director, Purdue Technology Centers Phone  
  Elizabeth Hart-Wells Assistant Vice President and Director of the Purdue Research Foundation, Office of Technology Commercialization Phone  

Engagement

Contact Information for Partners

  Cesni Ennis Associate Director University Foundations Relations Phone  
  Chris Foster P-12 STEM Program Director Phone  

Contact Information for Visitors

Discovery

Contact Information for Visitors

  Cindy Ream Engagement Operations Manager Phone  
  Phillip Fiorini Sr. Communications & Marketing Specialist Phone  

Select Your Next Chapter

Overview

The Overview chapter offers a glimpse at the unique features, the latest news, building locations and contact information for Discovery Park.

Discovery

Learn about how research has been reinvented at Discovery Park, how collaborations among scientists and stakeholders are seeking solutions to grand challenges, and the impacts of discovery.

Delivery

Discovery Park is delivering on Purdue's land-grant mission to serve the people of Indiana and the nation. Large-scale research drives economic development in a knowledge economy and Discovery Park is the engine.

Engagement

Activities at Discovery Park transform people's lives. Undergraduates gain hands-on research experience, business plan competitions nurture a new generation of entrepreneurs, and innovative diagnostic tools detect early stages of disease.

Partnerships

To meet today's grand challenges, a spectrum of partnerships are forming at Discovery Park -- international partners, partnerships with foundations, institutions and industry all contribute to advancing learning and research.