Faculty Policy Fellows Program

PPRI Faculty Policy Fellows have proposed an idea for a project in which they are catalyzing new discoveries, enhancing the policy influence of Purdue research, and developing interdisciplinary talent in established and emerging strategic areas of focus related to global grand challenge areas.

Faculty Policy Fellows

Gerald Shively

Associate Department Head and Professor of Agricultural Economics

Gerald Shively conducts nationally and internationally recognized research on agricultural development and the environment. His research focuses on the links among poverty, land and labor use, and natural resource management in developing regions of the world. His interests also include the environmental and distributional implications of sectoral and macroeconomic policies, and dynamic household models incorporating risk. Gerald’s international experience includes research in numerous African and Asian countries. Gerald has responded to environmental and social critiques of the Green Revolution, as well as neo-Malthusian concerns regarding humankind’s ability to sustainably feed a growing population. Gerald has conducted long-term field research in marginal and less-favored agricultural areas of the Philippines. This work aimed at better understanding how agricultural intensification, irrigation development, and adoption of modern agricultural technologies could slow or limit agricultural expansion into fragile environments, including tropical, old-growth forests. This work helped to inform policy debates on resource management and the proper role of policy in promoting uptake of environmentally sustainable agricultural practices. Gerald will be working on extending and promoting the Institute’s global work on the environment and cross-cutting issues related to policy and human decision making.

Gerald Shively

Mangala Subramaniam

Associate Professor of Sociology

Mangala Subramaniam’s research is in the broad areas of gender (and its intersections with caste, race, and class) and social movements. Her projects focus on gender politics and development, which examine the dynamics between state power and collective action by the severely disadvantaged for rights to basic needs, such as water, food, and health. She has recently authored/co-authored articles in journals such as Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research, Current Sociology, International Sociology, Sociological Perspectives, and Research in Social Movements, Conflicts, and Change. In addition to about 35 articles and book chapters, she has published three gender-related books. She has two main ongoing research projects. The first project focuses on gender, community organizations, and the state to examine the politics of HIV/AIDS prevention efforts. In an ongoing collaboration with an NGO, Swasti, in India, she examines which models of community organizations can sustain activities contributing to HIV risk reduction and ensure long term feasibility and replication across risk group categories. In related work, she is analyzing the ways in which those categorized as being at high risk of acquiring HIV cope with intimate partner violence. She is also interested in the policy implication of strategies used by high risk groups to cope with intimate partner violence. All of this research was funded. Earlier this academic year (fall 2016), Mangala was a Fellow at CLA’s Center for Behavioral and Social Sciences to develop a paper from the project, Effects of Participation in Community Organizations of High Risk Groups on Mitigating Risks to HIV. In fall of 2016, she presented a paper from this ongoing project at Oxford University (UK). In a new strand of work, she (with her colleague Sennott) will undertake a comparative study – India and South Africa – about how and what kinds of sexual and reproductive health information that women at risk of HIV, as mothers, convey to their daughters. This study is funded by a 2017 CLA Global Research Synergy grant. Her second project is about mid-career faculty, particularly women, and their satisfaction with recognition and appreciation and climate. Some of this work has emerged from participating in the COACHE working groups convened by the Purdue’s Office of the Provost. Mangala will continue the work on mid-career faculty as the 2017-18 College of Liberal Arts Dean’s Faculty Fellow (Project: Institutional Mechanisms for Breaking the ‘Glass Ceiling’: Gender, Race and Mid-Career Faculty). Mangala mentors undergraduate and graduate students and she teaches the required research methods course at the graduate level, the undergraduate gender course, and Global Social Movements, a new undergraduate sociology course she developed through a grant. She has presented papers at international conferences in Hungary, Australia, Ghana, and Japan. Mangala will be working on Intimate Partner Violence and Risks to HIV: Using Empirical Evidence for Policy Making.

Mangala Subramaniam

Laura Zanotti

Associate Professor of Anthropology

Laura Zanotti received her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Washington in 2008 and joined the faculty at Purdue in 2009. She is appointed in the Anthropology Department and has affiliations with the Center for the Environment, American Studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, and the Center for Diversity and Inclusion. Laura is an environmental anthropologist and interdisciplinary social scientist whose research program partners with communities to better understand how local, mostly rural, livelihoods and well-being can be sustained for future generations. In addition to environmental anthropology, she finds kinship with decolonizing approaches to research inquiry. She has partnered with the Kayapó, an indigenous community in Brazil, for over ten years and is currently working on projects around the United States and in Latin America on "media sovereignty" and digital landscapes, environmental justice and community resilience and healing. Her work has resulted in over ten published articles, an edited volume with Routledge, and several book chapters. Her book, Radical Territories in the Brazilian Amazon: the Kayapo’s Fight for Just Livelihoods, was recently published by the University of Arizona press. Zanotti’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and Purdue University. Laura will be working on developing a model of influence by identifying and examining the pathways through and conditions under which marginalized and underrepresented groups effectively pursue representation and affect governance processes that directly impact their ways of living.

Laura Zanotti

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