Birck Nanotechnology Center

"Nano" courses available at Purdue University

2009 Spring Semester

ECE 453 - Introduction To Nanoelectronics

Credit Hours: 3.00. Introduction to the operating principles of a new class of quantum devices made possible by revolutionary semiconductor fabrication techniques. Quantum concepts are emphasized and specific device examples given. Typically offered Fall.

ECE 526 - Fundamentals Of MEMS And Micro-Integrated Systems

Credit Hours: 3.00. (BME 581) Key topics in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and biological micro-integrated systems; properties of materials for MEMS; microelectronic process modules for design and fabrication. Students will prepare a project report on the design of a biomedical MEMS-based micro-integrated system. Offered in alternate years. Permission of department required. Typically offered Fall.

ECE 659 - Quantum Phenomena In Semiconductors

Credit Hours: 3.00. This course is designed for graduate students familiar with semiconductor fundamentals, with engineering electromagnetics and with linear algebra, but having no significant acquaintance with either quantum mechanics or statistical mechanics. The purpose of the course is to introduce the relevant concepts of quantum mechanics and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics as possible using device-related examples. Topics include: preliminary concepts, equilibrium, restoration of equilibrium, transport, effective mass equation, optical properties, advanced concepts. Offered every third semester. Prerequisite: ECE 60600, MA 51100. Typically offered Fall Spring.


MET 446 - Micro And Nano Manufacturing

Credit Hours: 3.00. Nanomanufacturing, silicon micromachining and fabrication, laser materials processing of microstructures, abrasive micromachining, mechanical micromaching, micro-scale rapid prototyping and sintering are introduced. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of how MEMS and non-electronic micro/nano devices are manufactured. Typically offered Summer Fall Spring.


ME 517 - Micro/Nanoscale Physical Processes

Credit Hours: 3.00. (CHE 517) Study of physical processes encountered in small scale systems like Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology. Introduction of tools for micron to molecular scale analysis of statics, dynamics, electricity and magnetism, surface phenomena, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Quantitative analysis of specific MEMS devices using finite element analysis. Typically offered Spring.

NUCL 553 - Nano-Macro Scale Applications Of Nuclear Technology

Credit Hours: 3.00. Introduction of the principles of nuclear science and engineering for addressing industrial and scientific issues ranging from sub nano-to-macro scales. Areas to be covered include: propulsion, high-energy density materials, supercooling, medical applications, sonoluminescence, novel detection systems for special nuclear and contraband materials, and advanced nuclear fusion power systems. Typically offered Fall.

CHE 517 - Micro/Nanoscale Physical Processes

Credit Hours: 3.00. (ME 51700) Study of physical processes encountered in small scale systems like Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology. Introduction of tools for micron to molecular scale analysis of statics, dynamics, electricity and magnetism, surface phenomena, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Quantitative analysis of specific MEMS devices using finite element analysis. Typically offered Spring.

MSE 547 - Introduction To Surface Science

Credit Hours: 3.00. Classical thermodynamics of surfaces: surface tension, surface excess properties, and surface segregation. Atomic structure of surfaces and surface reconstruction. Electronic structure of surfaces, surface states, and the electronic structure/properties of interfaces. Adsorption, surface diffusion, and clustering of adsorbates. Chemical reactions at surfaces. Offered in alternate years. Typically offered Fall.

MSE 548 - Deposition Processing Of Thin Films And Coatings

Credit Hours: 3.00. Processing and microstructural development of thin films and layered structures. Includes vapor, liquid, and reactive processing, as well as layer modification by annealing and beam techniques. Offered in alternate years. Typically offered Fall.

NCN - Curriculum on Nanotechnology
West Lafayette - nanohub.org
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The NCN seeks to bring the new understanding emerging from research in nanoscience into the graduate and undergraduate curriculum. We are now at the dawn of what might be a new era in technology, but to exploit the opportunities that nanoscience is giving us, engineers will need to learn how to think about materials, devices, circuits, and systems in a new way. Our ambitious, “Electronics from the Bottom” initiative is designed to do this in a comprehensive way for electronic devices and materials. The individual courses listed below teach new concepts and bring new approaches to the teaching of traditional concepts for a variety of fields of nanotechnology.

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