WORKSHOP ON INFORMAL INSTITUTIONS AND INTRACTABLE GLOBAL PROBLEMS

WORKSHOP ON INFORMAL INSTITUTIONS AND INTRACTABLE GLOBAL PROBLEMS, April 16-17, 2012, Purdue University | West Lafayette, Indiana USA
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Speakers

Olga Avdeyeva

Olga Avdeyeva

Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Olga Avdeyeva is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Loyola University Chicago where she teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in comparative politics. She received Ph.D. in Political Science at Purdue University in 2006. Dr. Avdeyeva's research interests are at the intersection of comparative politics and international relations with a focus on women's rights and gender politics and a regional interest in post-communist states of Central and Eastern Europe. Her work appeared in International Research Quarterly, Political Research Quarterly, Comparative European Politics, Social Politics, and International Journal of Human Rights, among other journals. Currently, Dr. Avdeyeva is working on a comparative cross-national book project examining compliance of European Union (EU) Enlargement states with requirements on gender equality in the labor market.

Louise Chappell

Louise Chappell

University of New South Wales

Professor Louise Chappell is an Australian Research Future Fellow in the School of Social Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia. During her four year fellowship Louise is researching the implementation of the gender justice mandate of the International Criminal Court. Louise has a strong research background in the fields of women’s rights and comparative gender and politics and has published widely in these fields in journals including Perspectives on Politics and Politics&Gender. In 2003 Louise was awarded the Victoria Schuck prize for the best book in women and politics from the American Political Science Association for Gendering Government, which was an initial attempt to bring together feminist and institutionalist perspectives to the study of women in politics. She is a co-director with Fiona Mackay, Georgina Waylen and Mona Lena Krook of the Feminist Institutionalism International Network (FIIN) based at Edinburgh University.

Marc Cohen

Marc Cohen

Oxfam America

Marc J. Cohen is a Senior Researcher at Oxfam America in Washington, DC. He is also an adjunct faculty member in the international development program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Oxfam in 2008, he was a research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (1998-2008) and a senior researcher at Bread for the World (1991-1998), also in Washington. Cohen's current research focuses on protection of civilians in conflict situations; conflict and food security; agriculture and post-conflict/post-disaster reconstruction; the transition from emergency assistance to development; disaster risk reduction; reform of the global humanitarian system; global food price volatility and its effects on low-income households; the impacts of climate change and biofuel production on food security and nutrition; governance and gender issues in rural development; and the human right to food. Cohen has carried out field research in Ethiopia, Haiti, Taiwan, Thailand, Uganda, and the United States. He received his B.A. in French from Carleton College, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is co-editor of, and contributor to, three recent books: The Global Food Crisis: Governance Challenges and Opportunities (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2009); Global Food-Price Shocks and Poor People: Themes and Case Studies (Routledge, 2012); and The Impact of Climate Change and Bioenergy on Nutrition (Springer/FAO, 2012). He has also published in such journals as Food Policy; Food Research International; Food, Culture, and Society; Global Governance; International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance, and Ecology; Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension; Journal of Nutrition; Foresight: The Journal of Futures Studies, Strategic Thinking and Policy; Social Research; Environment & Urbanization; Development in Practice; Development Policy Review; Sustainable Development Law and Policy; and Yale Human Rights and Development Law Journal.

Elisabeth Jay Friedman

Elisabeth Jay Friedman

University of San Francisco

Elisabeth Jay Friedman is Associate Professor of Politics and Latin American Studies at the University of San Francisco. Her publications include Unfinished Transitions: Women and the Gendered Development of Democracy in Venezuela, 1936-1996 (Penn State Press, 2000), and Sovereignty, Democracy, and Global Civil Society: State-Society Relations at UN World Conferences (With Kathryn Hochstetler and Ann Marie Clark, SUNY Press, 2005). She has also published articles on women’s organizing in Latin America and globally. Her current research focuses on the diffusion of gender-based and sexual rights in Latin America and the impact of information and communication technologies on transnational feminist organizing.

Joe Henrich

Joe Henrich

University of British Columbia

Dr. Henrich holds the Canada Research Chair in Culture, Cognition and Coevolution at the University of British Columbia, where he’s a professor in both Economics and Psychology. His theoretical work focuses on how natural selection has shaped human learning and how this in turn influences cultural evolution, and culture-gene coevolution. This work has explored the evolution of conformist learning and human status, as well as the emergence of large-scale cooperation, norms, social stratification, world religions and monogamous marriage. Methodologically, his research synthesizes experimental and analytical tools drawn from behavioural economics and psychology with in-depth quantitative ethnography, and he has performed long-term anthropological fieldwork in the Peruvian Amazon, rural Chile, and in the South Pacific. Dr. Henrich has also spearheaded highly interdisciplinary collaborations that have collected systematic ethnographic and experimental evidence from dozens of small-scale societies from around the globe. His work has been published in the top journals in biology, psychology, anthropology and economics, including Science, Nature, PNAS, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Cognition, American Economic Review, Current Anthropology and Trends in Cognitive Science. In 2004 he was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award, the highest award bestowed by the United States upon scientists early in their careers. In 2007 he co-authored Why Humans Cooperate. In 2009, the Human Behavior and Evolution Society awarded him their Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions. Dr. Henrich is currently a fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

Kathryn Hochstetler

Kathryn Hochstetler

University of Waterloo

Kathryn Hochstetler is CIGI Chair of Governance in the Americas at the Balsillie School of International Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, in Canada. She has published widely on environmental politics and the roles of social movements in Brazil, Mercosur, and United Nations conferences. Her most recent book is the prize-winning Greening Brazil: Environmental Activism in State and Society (Duke University Press, 2007, with Margaret E. Keck). Her current research includes a study (with SSHRC funding 2011-2014) of the positions Brazil and South Africa are taking in global climate change negotiations, as well as their implementation of their commitments through energy projects at home.

Breena Holland

Breena Holland

Lehigh University

Breena Holland holds a joint appointment in the Department of Political Science and the Environmental Initiative at Lehigh University. She earned her doctorate and master’s degree in Political Science at the University of Chicago and holds bachelor’s degrees from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management and the Department of Jurisprudence and Social Policy at the University of California at Berkeley. Holland’s book Environment and Capability is currently under contract with the Oxford University Press, and she has published several book chapters and articles in journals such as Political Research Quarterly, Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, and Geographic Review. Her research uses normative political theory to critique and improve contemporary approaches to environmental policy analysis and administrative rulemaking.

Lauren MacLean

Lauren MacLean

Indiana University

Lauren M. MacLean is an Associate Professor of political science at Indiana University. MacLean’s research interests focus on the politics of state formation, social welfare and citizenship in Africa and in American Indian/Alaska Native communities in the U.S. She earned her Ph.D. in 2002 from the Department of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley and then completed a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan (2002-2004). She has a book entitled Informal Institutions and Citizenship in Rural Africa: Risk and Reciprocity in Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and several articles published and forthcoming in Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Studies in Society and History, the International Journal of Public Administration, the Journal of Modern African Studies, Studies in Comparative International Development and World Development. MacLean is currently co-authoring a book, Field Research in Political Science, with Diana Kapiszewski and Ben Read (under contract with Cambridge University Press) and co-editing a volume, The Politics of Non-State Social Welfare Provision in the Global South, with Melani Cammett. MacLean has completed fieldwork and is drafting a book entitled Constructing Democracy in America: Tribal Consultation and the Representation of American Indians in Health Policy. MacLean is also developing a new project with Jennifer Brass and Sanya Carley (IU-SPEA) on the politics of collaborative governance in local-level, renewable energy projects in Africa.

Ellen Messer

Ellen Messer

Brandeis University

Ellen Messer is an anthropologist specializing in food, security, religion, and human rights. She was Director of the Brown University World Hunger Program, and currently holds visiting faculty positions at Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition and Policy and Brandeis University Heller School Programs in Sustainable International Development. Her research and writing address linkages among food, globalization, and conflict, and the value-added of human-rights approaches to food insecurity at multiple levels, including legal, political-economic, and sociocultural perspectives.

Leigh Raymond

Leigh Raymond

Purdue University

Leigh Raymond is Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and a founding member and Associate Director of the Purdue Climate Change Research Center. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from U.C. Berkeley, and a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University. Dr. Raymond’s research focuses on the role of norms and values in shaping political behavior and policy outcomes, especially in contrast to economic motivations. His primary focus has been on norms related to property rights as they affect market-based policies for environmental protection, including emissions trading, as considered in detail in his Resources for the Future Press book Private Rights in Public Resources. He is currently at work on a new book on recent developments in emissions trading policy.

Stephen Stich

Stephen Stich

Rutgers University

Stephen Stich is Board of Governors Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science at Rutgers University and Honorary Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty in 1989, he taught at the University of Michigan, the University of Maryland and the University of California, San Diego. His publications include six books, a dozen anthologies and over 150 articles. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of the Jean Nicod Prize and the first recipient of the Gittler Award for Outstanding Scholarly Contribution in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

Janet Swim

Janet Swim

The Pennsylvania State University

Janet Swim is a professor of Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. She chaired the American Psychological Task Force on climate change, now published in the American Psychologist. She is now president of the Society for Environment, Population, and Conservation Psychology. Her current research aims to understand barriers to and the facilitation of pro-environmental behaviors--both direct behaviors to reduce personal and household energy conservation and indirect behaviors such as environmental activism. Barriers include the potential mismatch between the social construction of pro-environmental behaviors and gender roles, particular masculine gender roles ideologies, and the lack of activation, or the neutralization, of affective responses to people and animals harmed by environmental problems, particularly climate change. Facilitation of pro-environmental behaviors include self-transcendent values, ways to help homeowners follow through on home energy audit recommendations, and the spread of pro-environmental norms and behaviors within individuals existing social networks.

Georgina Waylen

Georgina Waylen

University of Manchester

Until the end of March 2012 Georgina Waylen is Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield, UK. From April 1, 2012 she takes up a Chair in Politics at the University of Manchester. She has published and researched extensively on gender and politics, and in particular transitions to democracy and political economy. Her most recent book Engendering Transitions: Women's Mobilization, Institutions and Gender Outcomes was awarded the Victoria Schuck prize for the best book published on women and politics by the APSA in 2007. She is a co-director of the Feminist International Institutionalist Network (FIIN) and in the summer of 2012 she will begin work on a five year European Research Council Advanced Grant on "Understanding Institutional Change: A gender perspective" which includes informal institutions as a key part of the research.

S. Laurel Weldon

S. Laurel Weldon

Purdue University

S. Laurel Weldon, Professor of Political Science at Purdue University in Indiana, USA, received her Phd from the University of Pittsburgh in 1999. Weldon is the Director of Purdue’s new Center for Research on Diversity and Inclusion, co-Chair of the Faculty Leadership Committee of the Global Policy Research Institute, and Vice-President of the Global Institute for Gender Research. She is the author of many articles, book chapters, and two books ((When Protest Makes Policy: How Social Movements Represent Disadvantaged Groups, U Michigan 2011) and Protest, Policy and the Problem of Violence Against Women (University of Pittsburgh 2002)) and the co-editor (with an international team) of the first ever Oxford Handbook on Politics and Gender, which is underway. In a project supported by the NSF, Professor Weldon (together with Mala Htun) has compiled the largest ever database of women's rights and women’s movements, covering more than 10 areas of law and policy, 70 countries, and 4 decades. She has served on the editorial board of Politics & Gender and she is a past President of the Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA), and a member of Council for APSA, the national association's governing body. She is founding co-editor of the new journal Politics, Groups and Identities, a journal sponsored by the Western Political Science Association.