Message from the Director

Welcome to the Center for the Environment at Purdue University where our affiliated researchers, working with their global partners, conduct use-inspired science to address humanity’s most pressing environmental and sustainability challenges.
I encourage you to explore our web site or attend one of the many events that highlight our interdisciplinary research, education, and service activities.

– Timothy Filley, Interim Director
Center for the Environment

2016 C4E Annual Report


Forest fungi boost invasive plants, choke out native species

December 6, 2017

Certain types of tree-associated fungi make a forest a welcoming environment for invasive plant species, crowding out...

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AGU 2017 Poster Presentation by Alexandra Meyer: Estimating Spring Condensation on the Great Lakes

December 11, 2017

The Laurentian Great Lakes region provides opportunities for shipping, recreation, and consumptive water use to a large part of the United States and Canada. Water levels in the lakes fluctuate yearly, but attempts to model the system are inadequate because the water and energy budgets are still not fully understood. For example, water levels in the Great Lakes experienced a 15-year low period ending in 2013, the recovery of which has been attributed partially to decreased evaporation and increased precipitation and runoff. Unlike precipitation, the exchange of water vapor between the lake and the atmosphere through evaporation or condensation is difficult to measure directly. However, estimates have been constructed using off-shore eddy covariance direct measurements of latent heat fluxes, remote sensing observations, and a small network of monitoring buoys. When the lake surface temperature is colder than air temperature as it is in spring, condensation is larger than evaporation. This is a relatively small component of the net annual water budget of the lakes, but the total amount of condensation may be important for seasonal energy fluxes and atmospheric deposition of pollutants and nutrients to the lakes. Seasonal energy fluxes determine, and are influenced by, ice cover, water and air temperatures, and evaporation in the Great Lakes. We aim to quantify the amount of spring condensation on the Great Lakes using the National Center for Atmospheric Prediction North American Regional Reanalysis (NCEP NARR) Data for Winter 2013 to Spring 2017 and compare the condensation values of spring seasons following high volume, high duration and low volume, low duration ice cover

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