Recent News

Research seeks to improve electrical system against weather outages

September 18, 2017

Determining how to improve the resilience of power grid structures in the face of outages from severe weather events is the focus of a multidisciplinary study by Purdue professors. The project, “Towards a Resilient Grid: An Investment Prioritization Decision Framework that Integrates the Growing Risks of Severe Weather-Induced Outages,” received a $468,851 grant from the National Science Foundation.

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First measurements of iodine in the Arctic reveal questions about air pollution

September 6, 2017

New measurements of molecular iodine in the Arctic show that even a tiny amount of the element can deplete ozone in the lower atmosphere.

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U2U delivers tools, changes conversation on climate issues

August 15, 2017

A recently completed research and Extension project has led to the creation of several tools farmers can use for years to come. It also has provided a new way of looking at how to get climate information into the hands of those who need it, according to researchers involved in the 6-year study.

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No debate needed on climate change

August 3, 2017

As the world’s population deals with accelerating sea level rise, intensifying droughts and floods, and dying coral reefs, our Environmental Protection Agency should not be spending taxpayer dollars to distract Americans with a fabricated, made-for-TV debate.

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Purdue Extension state fair exhibits focus on choices for healthier bodies, stronger communities

August 3, 2017

Earth’s climate is changing, with an increase in extreme weather events reported worldwide. Studies show global temperatures have increased by 2 degrees Fahrenheit. What does this mean for Indiana, a state whose agricultural sector depends on a reliable temperature and rainfall patterns?

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Improved air quality research software to help reduce emissions, pollution

August 2, 2017

Purdue University researchers are developing an on-site computer and software system that could provide a more flexible, high-quality and user-friendly way to conduct agriculture-based air quality research to better understand and limit emission and pollution impact.

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Satellite technology could help agricultural producers more accurately measure subsurface moisture

June 26, 2017

Agricultural producers could, in the future, make use of better forecasts to more efficiently irrigate their fields using a Purdue-developed technology that could more accurately sense soil moisture below the surface through measuring the reflections of communication satellite signals. “The reflectivity of the surface is a function of the soil moisture, and that allows us to quantify the amount of moisture in the soil so, if necessary, growers can take corrective actions to protect their crops,” said James Garrison, a professor in Purdue’s School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering (by courtesy). “The technology we’re developing can be cost effective.

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Plants take up more carbon once acclimated to warmer temperatures

June 2, 2017

A new understanding about how plants react to high temperatures may help improve predictions about how climate change will affect the planet. Nick Smith, a Purdue University adjunct professor in Forestry and Natural Resources, and postdoctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, wanted to know how plant carbon uptake is affected by extended periods of different temperatures. The information may be helpful for models that use plant carbon uptake to estimate the effects of climate change. “Models have good representations of short-term changes in temperature, but few data exist for incorporating longer-term responses,” said Smith, whose research was part of his doctoral work under Purdue Professor Jeffrey Dukes. “Plants are currently the only way that carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere on land. The way plants are represented in these large-scale models is really important.”

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Trees are moving westward in response to precipitation changes, Purdue University professor reveals

May 17, 2017

After analyzing extensive data collected on 86 tree species in the eastern United States, a research team led by Purdue University professor Songlin Fei found that over the past 30 years, most trees have been shifting westward or northward in response to climate change. “Trees are shifting partially because of climate change, but their responses are species specific,” Fei said. “Deciduous trees like oak and maple are primarily moving westward. Evergreens are responding in a different way. They’re moving northwards.”

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Stanford scientists test links between extreme weather and climate change

April 24, 2017

After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour or drought, Noah Diffenbaugh and his research group inevitably receive phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role. "The question is being asked by the general public and by people trying to make decisions about how to manage the risks of a changing climate," said Diffenbaugh, a professor of Earth system science at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. "Getting an accurate answer is important for everything from farming to insurance premiums, to international supply chains, to infrastructure planning."

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