Purdue Climate Change Research Center

Courses

Spring 2013

FNR 10300: Introduction to Environmental Conservation

Instructor: John B. Dunning
MWF 4:30 pm - 5:20 pm

Introduction to ecological principles, history of conservation, natural resource management, human impacts on the environment, and environmental ethics. For all students interested in an introductory natural resource or environmental science elective.

 

EAS 10600: Geosciences in the Cinema

Instructors: Andrew M Freed
TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm (lecture); W 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm (film)

An introduction to earth and atmospheric sciences based on depictions in popular and documentary cinema. Topics will include: earthquakes, volcanoes, severe weather, dinosaurs, climate change, evolution, meteor impacts, and earth's interior. Lectures will focus on discussion of the relevant science, separating fact from fiction, and disaster management. Assignments will consist of viewing of films and answering questions about the science contained therein.

 

EAS 11100: Physical Geology

Instructor: Nathaniel A. Lifton

MW 11:30 am - 12:20 pm

Geologic processes and the development of land forms. Laboratory covers the study of minerals and rocks, the interpretations of topographic and geologic maps, and field investigations.

 

POL 22300: Introduction to Environmental Policy

Section 001:
Instructor: Amelia Caron Andrews
TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Section 002:
Instructor: Laura D Young
MWF 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm


Study of decision making as modern societies attempt to cope with environmental and natural resources problems. Focuses on the American political system, with some attention to the international dimension. Current policies and issues will be examined, including climate change.

 

AGEC 25000: The Economic Geography Of World Food And Resources

Instructor: Otto C. Doering
MWF 8:30 am - 9:20 am

This course provides an international and multidisciplinary perspective on food security and resources. Case studies that represent different regions of the world will be the focus of the course. The case studies, discussed in the context of the Millennium Development Goals, will help students gain knowledge and understanding of regional variations of food security and resources, sustainable development and economic growth throughout the world. In addition, separate segments will deal with various components influencing food security. These include segments on the physical environment and global climate change, economic systems and global trade, and social and demographic changes. Student performance will be evaluated based on four quizzes, three midterm exams, and a final project.

 

EAS 32000: Physics of Climate

Instructor: Harshvardhan
MWF 10:30 am - 11:20 am

To understand climate we describe and synthesize physical processes in the atmosphere and their coupling to the ocean, ice, and land. We quantitatively explore climatology with an equal balance of physical principles and scrutiny of available modern data. Topics include: visualization of atmospheric/land surface/oceanographic climatological data sets; theories of climate dynamics; and climate change. Beginning with radiative balance and simple energy balance models, the course progresses toward understanding the effects of radiative-convective forcing and rotation on the fluid envelopes. Analysis of data in an interactive computer-enabled environment is an important part of the course. By the end of this course, the student should know how the Earth System behaves at large scales and grasp the physical understandings of why.

 

POL 32700: Global Green Politics

Instructor: Elizabeth McNie
TR 10:30 am - 11:45 am

Analysis and assessment of the nature of global environmentalism, its connections with other new social movements, and its impact on domestic and international politics worldwide, with particular attention to green political parties and nongovernmental organizations.


AGRY 39900: Climate Change in Africa

Instructors: Richard Grant and Cliff Johnston
TR 10:30 am - 11:20 am

The impacts of climate change are greatest where societies are the poorest in resourecs and least capable of adapting. The effect of the changing climate on the arid regions of Africa have already been signicicant, threatening the verybric of the society. This seminar will look at the changes in climate in West Africa and present and future impacts of the changes on availability of food and water.

 

BIOL 48300: Environmental & Conservation Biology

Instructor:  Kerry Rabenold
MW 10:30 am - 11:20 am

Intended for mid-level undergraduates with ecological background, this course provides an introduction to the application of ecological principles to environmental issues.  It introduces fundamental ecological theory and empiricism, and demonstrates their application to practical issues concerning effects of environmental change, at each level of organization from the individual to the ecosystem.  Whole-biosphere issues, such as global climate and global patterns of productivity, form the umbrella issues for more focused integrations of ecological knowledge centered at the population level to understand the viability of small and threatened populations. The global extinction crisis and the geography of biodiversity are covered, and the course focuses on particular case studies of threatened ecosystems and analyses of the genetic and demographic stability of populations.  The history and prognosis for the coexistence of human civilizations with the rest of natural ecosystems form the background for applying ecology to policy.

IDIS 491/591: Sustainable Global Collaborations

Instructors:  Elena E Benedicto, Kirk David Alter, Gordon J Day, Alicia C Decker, John H Lumkes, and Darrell G Schulze
T 4:30pm-6:00 pm

The seminar course explores the intersection of human interactions in systems: social, technical, scientific, cultural, political, economic, historical, through a holistic approach to sustainable human experience. Also, introduces transdisciplinary approaches to global sustainable collaborative development and addresses the principles, practices, and strategies of development in a global context.

Biology 59500: Ecological Principles in Building

Instructor: Kerry Rabenold
TR 9:30 am - 10:20 am

Explores the application of ecological principles to “sustainability” in the design, construction and operation of buildings.  This will include principles of biomimicry in emulating homeostatic biological systems and their energy flow, nutrient cycling, information processing, and environmental impact.  The course steps through ecological background for the concepts of sustainability and resilience, the rationale for “green” building (societal need), assessment certification rubrics like LEED, design informed by ecological principles, sites and landscaping, energy and water conservation, materials conservation and impact, interior design and function, construction strategies, educational and outreach missions, and economic analysis.  The format is seminar-style, with rotating responsibility for leading discussion and short papers that focus on applying ideas to real buildings and their environmental impacts.

AGEC 59600: Global Land Use Change

Instructors: Uris Lantz Caldo Baldos and Thomas W Hertel
TR 10:30 am - 11:45 am

Study of selected current developments in agricultural economics. Topics will be announced in advance.

 

ANTH 62000: Political Ecology

Instructor: Laura C Zanotti
M 5:30 pm - 8:20 pm
Political ecology is a research framework that pairs the strengths of political economic analysis with socio-ecological approaches to environmental issues.  In this course we explore the diverse ways of doing political ecology by drawing upon the fields of anthropology, political science, geography, and history as well as interdisciplinary environmental sciences.  We also critically examine the field through a historical exploration of its intellectual genealogy, an investigation of current research trends, and imagining possible future directions.  Emphasis will be placed on both theory and methods while analyzing a variety of ethnographic case studies.  This reading-intensive course is open to graduate students in all programs. 

 

AGEC 69000: Energy, Resource, and Environmental Economics

Instructors: Juan P Sesmero and Nelson Benjamin Villoria
W 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm

Intensive study of selected current developments in agricultural economics. This spring, we’ll focus on the relevance of four topics --- water, land use change, international trade, and alternative energies --- to issues relating to agricultural sustainability at different scales. Topics will be announced in advance.

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Fall 2012

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EAPS 10000 - Planet Earth        

Instructor: Lawrence W. Braile
MW 10:30am - 12:20pm

An introduction to the Geosciences-Earth science, oceanography, atmospheric science and astronomy. The course emphasizes topics (earthquakes, volcanoes, ocean pollution, climate change, severe weather, etc.) that are of general interest and relevance, and the interconnections between various Earth processes.

FNR 10300 Introduction to Environmental Conservation    

Instructor: Jeffrey S. Dukes
MWF 9:30 am - 10:20 am

Introduction to ecological principles, history of conservation, natural resource management, human impacts on the environment, and environmental ethics. For all students interested in an introductory natural resource or environmental science elective.

EAPS 10400 - Oceanography

Instructor: James G. Ogg
MWF 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Origin of the oceans and marine life. Seafloor spreading and marine geology; currents, waves, and tides; marine organisms and ecology; beaches and nearshore life. Man's use and abuse of the sea, including contemporary problems and future opportunities. The role of oceans in climate and evolution of the biosphere. Recommended for both science and nonscience majors.

EAPS 11300 - Introduction to Environmental Science

Instructor: TBA
MWF 10:30 am - 11:20 am

An introduction to environmental science, including issues such as climate change, energy resources, air and water pollution, toxic waste disposal, soil erosion, natural hazards, and environmental planning. Includes extensive in-class discussion of case studies.

EAPS 13800 Thunderstorms and Tornadoes

Instructor: Ernest M. Agee
MWF 10:30 am - 11:20 am

An elementary treatment of the physical structure of the atmosphere and the dynamical conditions that lead to the development of convective clouds, thunderstorms, and severe weather (including tornadoes, hail, wind, rain, lightning, and flash floods). This course will also focus on storm climatology, the socioeconomic impact of severe weather, as well as prediction, detection, warnings, and safety procedures. Analysis of severe weather events will include tornado movies and case studies of ground/aerial surveys of storm damage.

EAPS 19100: The Dynamic Earth            002, 003, 005, 006, 007

Instructor: Tim Filley , William J. Zinsmeister
MWF 4:30 pm – 5:20 pm

Dynamic Earth investigates the fascinating inter-relationships of climate, oceans, geologic processes, and life on earth. The lecture, labs, and course textbook employ a systems-based approach to examine Earth Science at the global scale. The course explores how the Earth’s processes we observe today have connections and beginnings deep in earth’s distant geologic past. We discuss how processes born from outside our planet and solar system can change the course of life on Earth; and explore how human activities are contributing to global environmental change, including climate change. The course consists of lectures on Monday and Wednesday and includes one three hour lab per week. A 1-2 day field trip where we visit local geologic sites and the National Weather Service in Indianapolis is also given.

POL 22300 - Introduction to Environmental Policy

Instructor: TBA
MWF 1:30pm – 2:20

Study of decision making as modern societies attempt to cope with environmental and natural resources problems. Focuses on the American political system, with some attention to the international dimension. Current policies and issues will be examined.

EAPS 22500 - Science of the Atmosphere

Instructor: Suzanne M. Zurn-Birkhimer
MWF 2:30 pm - 3:20

An overview of the physics and dynamics of the atmosphere. Quantitative study of the energy balance of the atmosphere, condensation and precipitation processes, atmospheric motion and global circulation, severe storms, atmospheric chemistry. Contemporary issues such as human impact on climate, ozone depletion, numerical weather prediction and climate simulation, and modern measurement systems. Not available to students with credit in EAPS 22100. Intended for Science and Engineering majors only. Prior course work in calculus is required.

EAPS 22600 Introduction to Atmospheric Science Research

Instructors: Michael E. Baldwin and Robert J. Trapp
R 11:30 am - 2:20 pm

Students work on two different research projects designed by EAPS faculty. Research topics are complimentary to topics covered in EAPS 22500 and may include observational analysis, numerical modeling, or both. Each module includes introducing the research problem and learning pertinent software and statistical analysis, performing the research and discussing outcomes, student-designed revising or extending of the experimental design to explore results of interest, and presenting the findings to the class and interested EAPS faculty.

POL 32700 Global Green Politics

Instructor: Elizabeth C. Mcnie
TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Analysis and assessment of the nature of global environmentalism, its connections with other new social movements, and its impact on domestic and international politics worldwide, with particular attention to green political parties and nongovernmental organizations.

FNR 365  Natural Resource Issues, Policy and Administration

Instructor: Jordan W. Smith
Time: MWF 8:30am - 9:20am

A broad overview of current natural resource and environmental policy issues at the global, national, regional and local levels. The origins of major natural resource and environmental issues, and the key individuals and organizations that shaped them, are covered. The achievements and deficiencies of these policies, as well as potential proposals for alternative solutions are examined. A combination of lectures, discussions, in-class activities, guest speakers and independent research are utilized.

FNR 375 Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Instructor: Jordan W. Smith

An introduction to the human dimensions of forestry, wildlife, and recreation; students learn how values, attitudes, community, and behavior relate to natural resource management and decision-making. Various natural resource management stakeholders such as private landowners, natural resource agencies, the judiciary, and environmental and natural resource interest groups are discussed. Case studies specific to Indiana and the Midwest are utilized.

EAPS 39100 - Topics in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Team Weather Forecast

Instructor: Michael E. Baldwin
MWF 12:30pm - 1:20pm

Intermediate special topics in the earth and atmospheric sciences.

AGRY 39900 - Climate In Africa

Instructors: Richard H. Grant, Cliff T. Johnston
TR 10:30-11:20
The impacts of climate change are greatest where societies are the poorest in resources and least capable of adapting.  The effects of the changing climate on the dry regions of Africa have already been significant, threatening the very fabric of the society. This seminar will look at the changes in climate in West Africa and present and future impacts of the changes on availability of food and water.

POL 42900 EAPS 391 Climate, Science, and Society

Instructor: Elizabeth C. Mcnie
TR 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm

Climate change is one of the most complex, researched problems of the day, spanning disciplines as far ranging as atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemistry, economics and ethics, policy and ecology. The scientific activities undertaken to understand climate change have made huge strides in advancing our understanding of this problem and the vast majority of climate scientists agree that the climate is changing and that human activity is a contributing factor. At the same time, however, almost a quarter of the US Population either doesn’t believe the claims of anthropogenic global warming or believe it is a hoax perpetrated by greedy scientists wanting to ensure continued funding for their research. Why is it that so many Americans doubt the veracity of anthropogenic global warming? Why does the US Congress seem to be stuck in making any progress toward responding to climate change? What do we really know about global warming after all?

POL 52300 Environmental Politics and Public Policy    

Instructor: Leigh S. Raymond
TR 10:30 am - 11:45 am

The political problems of natural resource use and environmental quality. Theoretical foundations for environmental policy and its evaluation, the political context of environmental policy, principles of administering environmental policies, and the significance of international law and institutions for environmental policies.

AGEC 52500 Environmental Policy Analysis

Instructor: Juan P. Sesmero
TR 9:00 am - 10:15 am

Designed to assist in understanding how environmental information and knowledge are produced, disseminated, and utilized in a variety of institutional contexts. Readings are selected to promote discussion and interaction concerning alternative mechanisms for protecting environmental resources. Prerequisite: introductory microeconomics course suggested.

EAPS 42100 - Atmospheric Thermodynamics

Instructor: Harshvardhan Harshvardhan
TR 10:00am – 11:45am

Structure and composition of the atmosphere. Thermodynamics of dry and moist air, including adiabatic and pseudo-adiabatic processes, hydrostatic stability, and air mass determination. Prior course work in introductory atmospheric science, second semester physics or thermodynamics is required.

EAPS 42300 - Atmospheric Dynamics II

Instructor: Wen-Yih Sun
TR 12:00pm – 1:15pm

An extension of EAPS 42200, with emphasis on perturbation theory and hydrodynamics stability, air mass and frontal theory, barotropic and baroclinic models, wave cyclone theory, and numerical weather prediction.

EAPS 43300 - Synoptic Laboratory III

Instructor: TBA
M 2:30pm – 5:20pm

Diagnoses of midtropospheric wave propagation and growth. Analysis of surface pressure fields and fronts and their relationships to upper air features. Extensive use is made of teletype and facsimile weather information. Prior course work in atmospheric dynamics and synoptic lab II is required.

EAPS 53500 - Atmospheric Observations and Measurements

Instructor: Robert J. Trapp
MWF 10:30 am - 11:20 am

A course that introduces students to direct and remotely sensed observations of the atmosphere. Directly measured quantities discussed include temperature, pressure, moisture, wind, solar radiation, chemical properties of the atmosphere, etc. Remote sensing of cloud, precipitation, and air motion by weather radars, satellites, profilers, lidars, and other emerging technologies is reviewed. Students will gain experience in observation techniques and data interpretation, and will learn uncertainty and error assessment. Prior course work in atmospheric science and statistics is required.

FNR 57200 - Community Involvement In Natural Resource Management

Instructor: Linda Prokopy
W 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm

Engaging the public in natural resource decision making is an increasingly important and complex task. This course provides an overview of how to include diverse stakeholders in decision making, collaboration, and conflict resolution through readings, class discussions, and role plays. Typically offered Fall.

FNR 57300 - Community Involvement Practicum

Instructor: Linda Prokopy
TBD

Students who enroll in this course will participate in a service learning activity that enables them to apply course concepts from FNR 57200 to a “real life” context. Students enrolling in FNR 57200 are not required to take this course. Permission of instructor required.

EAPS 59100 - Planetary Dynamic

Instructor: David A. Minton
TR 10:30 am - 11:45am

Specialized study offered on an individual basis or through specially arranged course.

EAPS 59100 Solar and Thermal Radiation

Instructor: Harshvardhan Harshvardhan
MWF 1:30pm – 2:20pm

Specialized study offered on an individual basis or through specially arranged courses.

EAPS 59100 Forecast Verification

Instructor: Michael E. Baldwin
MWF 9:30 – 10:20am

Specialized study offered on an individual basis or through specially arranged courses.

EAPS 59100  Modelng Systems and Biogeochemical Cycles

Instructor: Qianlai Zhuang
TR 9:00 am – 10:15pm

Specialized study offered on an individual basis or through specially arranged courses.

STAT 59800 Statistical Methods for Environmental and Climate Data

Instructor: Bo Li
TR 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Study will cover both fundamental principles and modern statistical methodologies in spatial data analysis. Relevant packages and functions in free software R will be illustrated. Also the following topics: exploratory methods for spatial and spatio-temporal data analysis, spatial process estimation, dependency structure modeling, univariate and multivariate spatial and spatiotemporal statistical models, large data analysis techniques, modeling of lattice data and spatial point processes, and case studies with precipitation, wind, temperature, and other environmental and climate data.

ABE 69100  Environmental Informatics

Instructor: Keith A. Cherkauer
MW 9:30 am - 10:20 am  - F 1:30 pm - 3:20 pm

Primarily designed for advanced specialized topic areas in agricultural and biological engineering for which there is no specific course, workshop, or individual study plan, but having enough student interest to justify the formalized teaching of a course. Permission of instructor required.

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Spring 2012

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FNR 10300 - Introduction to Environmental Conservation

Instructor: John B. Dunning
MWF 9:30 am - 10:20 am

Introduction to ecological principles, history of conservation, natural resource management, human impacts on the environment, and environmental ethics. For all students interested in an introductory natural resource or environmental science elective.

EAPS 10600 - Geosciences in the Cinemaphys

Instructors: Gabe Bowen and Andy Freed
TR 10:30 am - 11:45 am (lecture); W 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm (film)

 An introduction to earth and atmospheric sciences based on depictions in popular and documentary cinema. Topics will include: earthquakes, volcanoes, severe weather, dinosaurs, climate change, evolution, meteor impacts, and earth's interior. Lectures will focus on discussion of the relevant science, separating fact from fiction, and disaster management. Assignments will consist of viewing of films and answering questions about the science contained therein.

PHYS 22000 - General Physics

Instructor: Nathaniel A. Lifton
MW 10:30 am - 11:20 am

Mechanics, heat, and sound, for students not specializing in physics.

POL 22300 - Introduction to Environmental Policy

Section 001: 
Instructor: Leigh S. Raymond
TR 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Study of decision making as modern societies attempt to cope with environmental and natural resources problems. Focuses on the American political system, with some attention to the international dimension. Current policies and issues will be examined, including climate change.

AGEC 25000 - The Economic Geography Of World Food And Resources

Instructor: Otto C. Doering
MWF 10:30 am – 11:20 am

This course provides an international and multidisciplinary perspective on food security and resources. Case studies that represent different regions of the world will be the focus of the course. The case studies, discussed in the context of the Millennium Development Goals, will help students gain knowledge and understanding of regional variations of food security and resources, sustainable development and economic growth throughout the world. In addition, separate segments will deal with various components influencing food security. These include segments on the physical environment and global climate change, economic systems and global trade, and social and demographic changes. Student performance will be evaluated based on four quizzes, three midterm exams, and a final project.

EAPS 32000 - Physics Of Climate 

Instructor:Harshvardhan Harshvardhan
MWF 10:30 am - 11:20 am

Open to majors in the Schools of Science, Agriculture, and Engineering. To understand climate we describe and synthesize physical processes in the atmosphere and their coupling to the ocean, ice, and land. We quantitatively explore climatology with an equal balance of physical principles and scrutiny of available modern data. Topics include: visualization of atmospheric/land surface/oceanographic climatological data sets; theories of climate dynamics; and climate change. Beginning with radiative balance and simple energy balance models, the course progresses toward understanding the effects of radiative-convective forcing and rotation on the fluid envelopes. Analysis of data in an interactive computer-enabled environment is an important part of the course. By the end of this course, the student should know how the Earth System behaves at large scales and grasp the physical understandings of why.

POL 32700 - Great Issues: Global Green Politics

Instructor: Elizabeth McNie
MWF 9:30 am - 10:20 am

Analysis and assessment of the nature of global environmentalism, its connections with other new social movements, and its impact on domestic and international politics worldwide, with particular attention to green political parties and nongovernmental organizations.

AGRY 33500 - Weather And Climate

Instructor: Dev Niyogi
TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm 

An introductory course in meteorology and climatology with applications to daily life. The study of the fundamental physical principles behind weather and climate and how they apply to the homeowner and the world citizen. Emphasis is on how to interpret weather conditions and forecasts, what controls the wide range of climates in the world, and what the future may hold.

AGRY 33700 - Environmental Hydrology

Instructor: Laura C. Bowling
MWF 9:30 am - 10:20 am                              

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with both the basics of how water moves through the environment and current theories as to how hydrologic response is modified by environmental change at a variety of temporal and spatial scales.

AGRY 39900 - Individual Study

Instructor: Laura C. Bowling
R 2:30 pm - 5:20 pm

Supervised individual study or research over topics not covered in other courses. Arrange with agronomy faculty before registering. Permission of instructor required.

EAPS 39100 / POL 42900 - Climate, Science, and Society

Instructor: Elizabeth C. McNie
MWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm

Climate change is one of the most complex, researched problems of the day, spanning disciplines as far ranging as atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemistry, economics and ethics, policy and ecology. The scientific activities undertaken to understand climate change have made huge strides in advancing our understanding of this problem and the vast majority of climate scientists agree that the climate is changing and that human activity is a contributing factor. At the same time, however, almost a quarter of the US Population either doesn’t believe the claims of anthropogenic global warming or believe it is a hoax perpetrated by greedy scientists wanting to ensure continued funding for their research. Why is it that so many Americans doubt the veracity of anthropogenic global warming? Why does the US Congress seem to be stuck in making any progress toward responding to climate change? What do we really know about global warming after all?

BIOL 48300 - Great Issues: Environmental And Conservation Biology

Instructor: Kerry N. Rabenold
MW 10:30 am - 11:20 am

This course provides an introduction to the application of ecological principles and research to environmental issues and conservation policy.  It introduces fundamental ecological theory and empiricism, and demonstrates their application to practical issues concerning effects of environmental change, at each level of organization from the individual to the ecosystem.  It emphasizes the interplay of theoretical models, observation and experimentation in testing principles, and practical limitations in their application to environmental management or restoration.  We explicitly discuss the problem of scientific literacy in communicating complex issues and alternative responses, and the role of journalism in popular perceptions.  New scientific developments will be stressed, along with the prognosis for advancement of the science in the face of complexities like interactions among processes at different levels of organization.  Understanding the determinants of stability of natural systems, and the sustainability of our use of them, is critical.  For instance, while the acceleration of global extinctions and the geography of biodiversity will be covered, the course focuses on particular case studies of threatened ecosystems and viability analyses of their constituent populations. 

 

AAE 59000 - Introduction to Remote Sensing

Instructor: James L. Garrison
MWF 4:30 pm - 5:20 pm

This course provides students with an overview of the key elements of Earth remote sensing systems, including instruments, satellite (and to a lesser degree, airborne) platforms, data processing and orbit/mission design.

 

EAPS 59100/STAT 59800 - Climate Time Series Analysis

Instructor: Alexander Gluhovsky
TTH  9:00 am - 10:15 am

An introductory course in time series analysis combining basics traditionally taught in such courses with topics of central importance in current weather and climate research: trends, long memory, extremes, nonlinear time series, chaos and complexity. Suitable for both graduate and upper-level undergraduate students from geosciences as well as from physics, engineering, and finance.

Note - it was incorrectly listed in the course catalog as remote sensing systems design II - this course is not the second course in a sequence. 

Contact Information

Purdue University
PCCRC
203 S. Martin Jischke Drive
MANN 105
West Lafayette, IN 47907