The toolkit utilizes climate datasets and activities to develop understanding of how the Earth’s climate system is changing. Small group and individual activities require participants to interpret, analyze, and represent climatic data and use scientific concepts to explain climate events. Included in the toolkit:

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The program and toolkit were developed in collaboration among Professor Dan Shepardson (Departments of Curriculum and Instruction and Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences), Purdue University, Project PI and Professor Dev Niyogi (Departments of Agronomy and Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences), Purdue University, Project Co-PI and Indiana State Climatologist, with:

  • Adam Baker, Meteorologist, National Weather Service, Indianapolis
  • Mary Cutler, Naturalist, Tippecanoe County Parks and Recreation Department
  • Olivia Kellner, PhD student, Purdue University
  • Mark Koschmann, Science Teacher, St. John’s Lutheran School, Midland, MI
  • Ted Leuenberger, Former Science Teacher, Benton Jr./Sr. High School
  • Ian Pope, Graduate Research Assistant, Purdue
  • Hans Schmitz, Extension Educator, Purdue
  • Jan Sneddon, Director, Indiana Earth Force and President, Environmental Education Association of Indiana

Activities For Conceptualizing Climate And Climate Change Highlights

The activities were developed in collaboration among Dan Shepardson, Purdue, Project PI and Dev Niyogi, CoPI and Indiana State Climatologist, Purdue University Departments of Curriculum and Instruction and Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, and:

  • David Burch, Eastern Greene Junior-Senior High School, Bloomfield, IN
  • Mark Koschmann, St. John’s Lutheran School, Midland, MI
  • Ted Leuenberger, Benton Central Junior-Senior High School, Oxford, IN
  • Graduate Students Umarporn Charusombat and Soyoung Choi, Purdue University
  • Mary Maxine Browne, Copy Editor

The activities are designed to promote active learning, viewing students as active thinkers who construct their own understandings. The activities, therefore, require that students:

  • interpret, visualize, and transform scientific data and apply scientific concepts
  • analyze, evaluate, and explain scientific evidence and information
  • discuss and represent ideas and different perspectives
  • work collaboratively to make decisions and draw conclusions