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One person’s vision can change the world, and, at the most intimate level, change a life. That’s how Purdue researchers approach their work — on the frontiers of medicine. Their challenge is to fine-tune personal medicine, speed the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry, perfect cancer drugs, unlock the key to stuttering. Vision, dedication, solutions that can change the world, one person at a time. These are Purdue’s Health Makers.

Marietta Harrison
Marietta Harrison
Pharmacy

Marietta Harrison

We may never find a magical medical pill that cures all types of cancer, but Marietta Harrison says that recent advances are broadening the horizon for personalized medicine.

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Pedro Irazoqui
Pedro Irazoqui
Engineering

Pedro Irazoqui

Epilepsy strikes with little or no warning, as neurons in the brain begin firing in a synchronized chaos that renders its victims helpless.

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Lisa Mauer
Lisa Mauer
Agriculture

Lisa Mauer

Food and vitamins aren't always what they seem. Lisa Mauer is uncovering new techniques to detect pathogens and discovering how to improve the quality and stability of our vitamins.

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Philip Low
Philip Low
Science

Philip Low

The elimination of harmful side effects from the treatments for the most debilitating diseases is the goal of chemist Philip Low, who has successfully increased cancer drug potency while reducing toxicity. And the end is in sight.

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Susan Morgan
Susan Morgan
Liberal Arts

Susan Morgan

A black market for human organs may make for an interesting plot twist, but according to Susan Morgan, Hollywood is doing more harm than good.

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Rex Reklaitis
Rex Reklaitis
Engineering

Rex Reklaitis

The pharmaceutical industry is slow in bringing new products to market, but chemical engineer Rex Reklaitis and his team have a plan that could cut the development time for new drugs in half.

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Christine Weber-Fox
Christine Weber-Fox
Health and Human Sciences

Christine Weber-Fox

Four to five percent of preschool children stutter. Worldwide. Most outgrow it, but one percent of the general population endures a lifelong struggle with basic communication. Christine Weber-Fox is beginning to understand why.

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