Financial Aid Policies & Appeals

Policies

Appeals

Policies

Adding/Dropping Classes

Financial aid may be revised when classes are dropped, not attended, or when non-participation is reported by professors.

This information is for the fall and spring semesters only. Different timeframes and processes are in place for summer.

Weeks 1-4

Several factors may lead to a review of financial aid eligibility within the first four weeks of the semester. If necessary, financial aid eligibility may be revised and result in a bill that the student is responsible for paying. Please review the following policies so you are aware of the potential impact a change in enrollment may have on your financial aid eligibility.

Initial Course Participation

Professors have a directive from the Office of the Provost to report initial course participation for students by the end of the fourth week of class. This process is known as Initial Course Participation (ICP). If a professor reports that you have not participated in the course, your financial aid may be adjusted to match your actual enrollment at that time. Although professors should report ICP by the end of the fourth week of class, they may still do so after that date, which may lead to a revision in financial aid eligibility. To view how your instructor(s) reported your attendance in class, log on to myPurdue and select Initial Course Participation under the "Academic Tab". You should contact your professor if you believe ICP has been reported incorrectly on your behalf.

Note: You are automatically assumed to be participating in your courses unless the professor reports otherwise.

Census Date

Purdue determines eligibility for financial aid based on level of enrollment at a defined point in the semester, known as the Census Date. The Census Date is the end of the fourth week of the fall and spring terms. Financial aid may be adjusted after the Census Date if your enrollment on that date does not match your expected enrollment.

For example, you enrolled in 12 credit hours (full-time status) at the beginning of the semester and received financial aid based on full-time enrollment. You later dropped or withdrew from a 3 credit hour course. At Census Date, your actual enrollment is 9 credit hours (three-quarter-time status). Your financial aid eligibility will be recalculated to reflect three-quarter-time enrollment.

Division of Student Financial Aid (SFA), formerly known as the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana (SSACI), 4-Week Rule

The Division of Student Financial Aid (SFA) administers fee-dedicated state aid funding to eligible recipients. In order to qualify and remain eligible for the Higher Education Award and the Twenty-first Century Scholarship, a student must remain enrolled full-time through the Census Date. The amount of state aid may be reduced or cancelled if you receive a tuition refund at any time during the semester.

Financial aid that is subject to revision or cancellation as a result of any of the above includes Federal Pell grant, any Indiana State grants or scholarships, the Presidential Scholarship, and the Trustees Scholarship. Your financial aid will be revised to reflect the number of credit hours you are enrolled and participating in on the Census Date. The student is responsible for any bill that results.

Weeks 5-6

On the Purdue West Lafayette (PWL) campus, the tuition refund period extends through the sixth week of classes. PWL students are assessed regular full-time fees for 8 or more credit hours of enrollment. Students that drop below 8 credit hours during weeks 5 and 6 in the semester will receive a tuition refund. As a result, your fee-dedicated financial aid and fee remissions will be reduced or cancelled. The student is responsible for any bill that results.

Note: Tuition refunds only occur during tuition refund periods as outlined by the Bursar's Office.

Weeks 1-16

If a student fully withdraws from classes before the end of the term, the Bursar's Office will perform the Federal Return to Title IV calculation to determine if and how much aid must be repaid. The student is responsible for any bill that results.  

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Census Date

What is Census Date?

Eligibility for financial aid at Purdue University is based on the number of credit hours you are enrolled and attending/participating in at the end of the fourth week of classes for the fall and spring terms, defined as the Census Date. Financial aid may be adjusted if your enrollment on the Census Date differs from the enrollment initially used to determine your financial aid eligibility.

What does this mean?

Financial aid eligibility is determined based on level of enrollment. Certain types of financial aid require full-time enrollment to maintain eligibility; other types of financial aid only require half-time enrollment. If you receive financial aid that is based on full-time enrollment and have reduced your credit hours as of the Census Date, an award may be cancelled and you may be billed for lost aid.

Example

You enrolled in 12 credit hours (full-time status) at the beginning of the semester and received financial aid based on full-time enrollment. You later dropped or withdrew from a 3 credit hour course. At Census Date, your actual enrollment is 9 credit hours (three-quarter-time status). Your financial aid eligibility will be recalculated to reflect three-quarter-time enrollment.

What can you do?

If you anticipate a change in enrollment, please contact our office to determine how this change will impact your financial aid.

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Citizenship Requirements

For federal, state of Indiana, and Purdue need-based aid eligibility, a student must be a U.S. citizen or "eligible" non-citizen.

For a non-citizen to be eligible for financial aid consideration, the student must possess a valid Alien Registration Card I-551 or I-151, be classified as a conditional permanent resident with a valid I-151C Registration Card, or have a passport or I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record) showing one of the following designations:

  • Refugee
  • Asylum Granted
  • Indefinite parole and/or Humanitarian Parole
  • Cuban-Haitian Entrant

If you have any questions concerning your citizenship status, you should contact the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

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Complete Withdrawal / Return to Title IV Aid

Title IV (Federal) funds are awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend school for the entire period for which the assistance is awarded. When a student withdraws, the student may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV funds that the student was originally scheduled to receive. If a student has received Title IV financial aid, a refund must be calculated under the Federal Return of Title IV Funds policy. The refunds are based on the number of days attended for the semester, divided by the total number of days in the semester (minus any scheduled breaks of at least five days in length). Funds are deposited back to the financial aid accounts in accordance with federal regulations. If financial aid funds have been earned and not yet received, the student will be contacted by the Office of the Bursar.

Further information about refunds and return of Title IV financial aid funds is located at the Office of the Bursar: http://www.purdue.edu/business/bursar/payments/refunds.html

University withdrawal procedures is located at the Office of the Dean of Students: https://www.purdue.edu/odos/sac/withdrawal/

Contact your residence hall manager or University Residences Administration for information about refunds of University housing payments.

Unofficial Withdrawal

If a student began attendance and has not officially withdrawn fails to earn a passing grade in at least one course offered over an entire period, the institution must assume, for Title IV purposes, that the student has unofficially withdrawn. A student in this situation may be subject to a Title IV refund. Division of Financial Aid reviews student records at the end of each semester and notifies the Office of the Bursar of any students who have unofficially withdrawn.

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Defaults or Overpayments

A student will be denied eligibility for financial aid if he/she is in default on any federal student loan or owes a refund on a federal grant program.

A student in default is defined as a student borrower who is 270 or more days past due in repaying a Federal student loan. Such a borrower is not eligible to receive additional Title IV federal student aid funds unless the borrower has made satisfactory arrangements with the holder of the loan to repay the loans.

An overpayment exists whenever a student receives aid that exceeds his or her eligibility for a Title IV federal student aid program. Overpayments can be caused by incorrect reporting of information on the FAFSA, miscalculating cost of attendance, miscalculation of the Estimated Family Contribution by a school, paying ineligible students, and paying aid in excess of grant or loan maximums. In general, a student is liable for any Title IV federal student aid fund overpayment made to him or her. A student who receives an overpayment of a Title IV program loan, or a Title IV program grant may reestablish eligibility for Title IV program assistance by repaying the excess amount, or by making arrangements satisfactory to the holder of the overpayment debt to pay the excess amount.

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Dependency Status

Overview

Financial aid regulations assume that the student and the parents have primary responsibility for meeting the educational costs of post-secondary education. The level of contribution is based on ability to pay, not on willingness to pay.

If a student can answer YES to at least ONE question in Step Three of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the student is considered "independent" for financial aid purposes, meaning no parent information is to be reported on the FAFSA. Additional verification or documentation of independent status may be required by the financial aid office. The Step Three questions on the FAFSA include:

  • Were you born before January 1, 19XX (making you 24 or older)?
  • Are you married as of day you file the FAFSA?
  • Are you working on a master's or doctorate program?
  • Are you currently active duty military personnel for other than training purposes?
  • Are you a veteran of the US Armed Forces?
  • Do you have children who receive more than half of their support from you?
  • Do you have dependents (other than your children or spouse) who live with you and receive more than half of their support from you?
  • Are both of your parents deceased? Were you in foster care, or were you a ward of the court after age 13?
  • Are you an emancipated minor as determined by a court in your state of legal residence?
  • Do you have a legal guardian? This is not a biological parent, but someone who has been appointed by a court to serve as your guardian.
  • Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
  • Did the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
  • Did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?

Parents reluctant to help?

What if your parents refuse to file the FAFSA with you or help pay for college expenses? Visit www.FinAid.org for a frank discussion on the subject.

Irreconcilable break with parents?

Per federal regulations, a student may be considered independent if a financial aid administrator determines and documents the student's independent status based on unusual circumstances. Unusual circumstances are those circumstances, which, in the professional judgment of a financial aid administrator, warrant the student to be considered independent. Examples would include situations in which the student's parents are physically or mentally incapacitated.

If a student fails to meet the FAFSA criteria for independent student status and can document an irreconcilable break in relationship with each of their parents, they should discuss the situation with a financial aid counselor.

What if I'm getting married?

Although married students are considered independent, those that marry after filing the FAFSA can update their marital status to be considered independent. Purdue will accept marital status updates until mid-October for fall only or academic year enrollment and until mid-March for spring only enrollment. A copy of the marriage license and student and spouse federal tax returns will be required.

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Financial Aid Basics

For many students, financial aid can greatly affect their decision about whether or not to attend college, or which institution they should attend. Because of its importance, the decision to apply for financial aid, and which programs to accept, should be made only with a complete understanding of the application process, benefits, terms, conditions, and other responsibilities.

Financial aid is any grant, scholarship, educational loan, or part-time employment, offered for the express purpose of helping a student pay for educationally related expenses. Such aid is usually provided by federal, state, institutional, or private agencies. If you qualify, you may be offered any one, or a combination of these types of aid, depending on your financial need and the funds available from each source. Scholarship awards may also depend upon achievement or a talent/ability. Students are not allowed to receive aid that exceeds their estimated cost of attendance.

Watch: www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbJ55UWMEFE

Determining Financial Need

When applying for federal student aid, the information you report on the FAFSA is used to calculate your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The formula used to calculate your EFC is established by law and is used to measure your family's financial strength on the basis of your family's income, assets, family size and number of family members in post-secondary education. The EFC is used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid as well as other student aid programs. Cost of Attendance (COA) is also referred to as a budget. Financial need is determined by subtracting the EFC from the COA. Please see the formula below.

Cost of Attendance
- Expected Family Contribution
= Financial Need

Your eligibility for need-based aid is determined by subtracting other outside financial assistance (scholarships) from the calculated financial need. Students are not allowed to receive aid that exceeds their Cost of Attendance.

Financial Need
- Other outside Financial Assistance
= Eligibility for need-based aid (grants, subsidized student loans and work study)

Watch: www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQxorQ9s_pY

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Impact of Drug Conviction

A conviction for any offense involving the possession or sale of illegal drugs during a period of enrollment for which you receive Title IV federal student aid may result in the loss of future financial aid eligibility. If you are convicted of possessing or selling drugs after you submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), you must notify the Division of Financial Aid immediately.

If a student successfully completes a drug rehabilitation program, the student may regain federal student aid eligibility on the date the program is successfully completed. For information on how a drug conviction impacts your financial aid, complete the Student Aid Eligibility Worksheet on the Federal Student Aid website. To report a drug conviction contact the Division of Financial Aid.

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Incarceration

Incarceration limits the federal student aid funds a student is eligible to receive. Students incarcerated in federal or state institutions are not eligible for the Federal Pell Grant or federal student loans. Students incarcerated in institutions other than federal or state are eligible for federal student aid except for federal student loans. Any student incarcerated during a period of enrollment must notify the Division of Financial Aid.

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Initial Course Participation

Federal regulations require that student financial aid recipients commence attendance/participation in coursework to be eligible for financial aid.

Regulations define attendance/participation as follows:

Academic attendance and attendance at an academically-related activity include, but are not limited to:

  • Physically attending a class where there is an opportunity for direct interaction between the instructor and students;
  • Submitting an academic assignment;
  • Taking an exam, an interactive tutorial, or computer-assisted instruction;
  • Attending a study group that is assigned by the institution;
  • Participating in an online discussion about academic matters; and
  • Initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course; and

Do not include activities where a student may be present, but not academically engaged, such as:

  • Living in institutional housing;
  • Participating in the institution's meal plan;
  • Logging into an online class without active participation; or
  • Participating in academic counseling or advisement.

A determination of academic attendance or attendance at an academically-related activity must be made by the institution; a student's certification of attendance that is not supported by institutional documentation is not acceptable.

Purdue instructors are required to report Initial Course Participation (ICP).

If a student has attended at least one class OR submitted one academic-related activity (quiz, homework, sign-in sheet, etc.), they are considered to have commenced participation for that individual course. Only those students who have never attended at least one class and have never submitted an academic-related activity are reported by the professor as not participating in the course.

Logging into Blackboard Learn is not considered in determining ICP, but academic activity submitted within Black Board is considered in ICP reporting.

By the end of the 4th week of class, the Division of Financial Aid reviews enrollment and ICP reporting for all financial aid recipients, including online self-paced or open-ended courses, and adjusts financial aid as necessary. Individuals planning to take 8 week courses during the second half of the semester must be enrolled in them by the end of the 4th week of the regular semester. ICP reporting for these courses should be completed by the end of the second week of the course.

Although courses reported as not attending through ICP will appear on the transcript as enrolled, and will be billed by the Office of the Bursar, they cannot be considered as enrollment when adjusting financial aid.

If a student withdraws from the University or individual courses after the 4th week of class, further adjustments may be made to financial aid.

Aid adjustments resulting from enrollment review cannot be reinstated for students who enroll in additional courses after the 4th week of class. Students who have remaining Stafford Loan eligibility however may continue to borrow.

Students can view their status on myPurdue by:

  1. Accessing the Academic tab
  2. Choosing "Initial Course Participation"
  3. Select the current term
  4. The header "Initial Course Participation" lists how professors have reported a student's participation.

Note: If an instructor has reported "NO" (has not attended) and the student believes this information to be incorrect, they must contact their instructor to resolve the issue.

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Mission, Vision and Student Financial Aid

DFA Vision

The Division of Financial Aid will offer seamless delivery of financial aid and financial aid services allowing students to conduct all of their financial aid activities online. We will become a national leader in the area of student financial aid delivery and will promote educating students and their parents in financial literacy. Through our research activities, we will strengthen our understanding of the needs and the impact of financial aid by recruiting and retaining students through graduation. We will be supportive of the diversity and inclusion goals within the institution by having a multicultural workforce able to provide exemplary customer service to a diverse student body.

DFA Mission

The Division of Financial Aid mission is to assist students and parents by providing a supportive environment which helps families apply for and receive financial aid resources to assist in meeting their Purdue college expenses. We will become a national leader in the area of student financial literacy and will promote the education of students and their parents in financial literacy. We educate students and their parents in understanding the financial aid process and financial aid program guidelines. We provide data and research to support new financial aid programs or to change existing financial aid programs for more effective recruitment and retention of students through graduation. By assisting with Purdue affordability, students are able to participate in becoming global citizens. We are dedicated to making a positive difference for those we serve. We embrace a culture that treats all students, parents, faculty, and staff with respect, collegiality, and civility.

As participants in the U. S. Department of Education Quality Assurance Program, our goal is to ensure that the delivery of student aid funds is conducted accurately, expediently, and with integrity.

Policy Governing Student Financial Aid

As Indiana's Land-Grant University, Purdue embraces the principle of extending access to higher education to a diverse body of qualified students. Since its founding in 1869, Purdue has grown from a single campus in West Lafayette to a multi-campus university system, thus allowing greater access to an affordable Purdue degree. Each Purdue campus defines access and affordability in relationship to its strategic plan.

The strategic plan of Purdue West Lafayette delineates its vision to achieve preeminence among the world-class institutions of higher education. The plan suggests that Purdue Recruit and retain academically talented undergraduate and graduate students with exemplary support for them to achieve success and Enhance human and intellectual diversity among studentsThus, Purdue's policy that governs student financial aid awards is based on financial need, academic merit, and the need to enhance diversity through these awards.

The first priority for financial aid is given to students with demonstrated financial need. Through this priority, Purdue ensures that the needs of Indiana residents are addressed based on available student aid funds each year.

Academically talented students are awarded merit-based financial aid on a competitive basis as they demonstrate their academic achievements. These students may also qualify for need-based aid when eligible, just as needy students may qualify for merit-based aid as well.

Through the need-based and the merit-based aid programs, Purdue also attempts to enhance student diversity in order to provide an academic environment that is conducive to educating all students for a multicultural workforce and society, and for cultivating civic leaders who are reflective of our diverse society. Purdue extends and expands opportunities for higher education to a wide range of populations in Indiana and the nation through the aid programs.

Purdue optimizes the use of various sources of student financial aid including federal and state aid funds, institutional scholarships and grants, student employment, loan programs, and privately funded grants based on donor intent. Eligible students are awarded financial aid packages that include funds from one or more of these sources. Based on the extent of aid funds available each year, Purdue distributed these funds to cover as much of the educational costs to eligible students as possible.

Purdue's long-term goal in student financial aid is to systematically reduce the various levels of dependency on students' loans in the aid packages so as to reduce the indebtedness of students, particularly those with financial need, upon their graduation from Purdue. To that end, Purdue remains committed to increasing grant and scholarship funds from public and private sources.

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Overawards

Federal regulations require that, if any time during the enrollment period additional resources become available in excess of a student's financial need, reduction in previous awards (including grants, scholarships, work and loan funding) made by DFA may be necessary.

All or part of any undisbursed loan funds may be returned to the lender if additional resources become available to a student that were not originally considered when eligibility for the loan funds was determined; returned funds would be applied to reduce the student's loan debt.

Purdue does not award financial aid over the estimated cost of attendance. If additional resources become available, a reduction in previous awards may occur to keep the student's aid package within the estimated cost.

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Prior Degree

A student who has earned a bachelor's degree and returns to school as an undergraduate is ineligible for grants and scholarships but can be considered for Federal Stafford Loans.

Eligibility for Pell grants and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity grants (FSEOG) is almost exclusively restricted to students who have not received a bachelor's degree or completed the requirements for one. Degrees from unaccredited and foreign schools can also count as bachelor's degrees in some cases. If you have obtained a bachelor's degree and are returning to school as an undergraduate student, you would only be eligible for federal Stafford loans.

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Privacy Policy

The Division of Financial Aid (DFA) strives to protect the confidentiality and privacy of student records as required by law. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (as amended), commonly referred to as the Buckley Amendment, sets forth the educational information of a student and how that information should be treated to protect student privacy.

More information regarding student information and privacy at Purdue University is available from the Office of the Registrar.

Advice to Students, Parents, and External Parties Seeking Student Financial Aid Records

The Division of Financial Aid recommends custodial parents, non-custodial parents, and interested third parties (lawyers, scholarship organizations, etc.) seek financial aid award information directly from the student. Students have quick and easy access to their financial aid, billing, and grade report records via myPurdue.

DFA counselors may provide custodial parents whose information is provided on the FAFSA with financial aid information services, but are not required to do so. In some instances, DFA reserves the right to refer some custodial parent questions back to the student to receive information to protect the confidentiality of student records.

DFA Student Financial Aid Information Release Practices

Note that for financial aid purposes, parent definitions and independent student definitions are defined by federal student aid regulations and may differ from Internal Revenue Service dependent exemption tax rules and definitions. Any exceptions to these DFA information release practices are subject to Director approval.

  • Parent Financial Aid Record Release

Financial aid and parent records submitted to DFA are not considered student educational records. Because of this, our office will not release copies of these documents to the student. For example, DFA will not release a copy of a parent tax return to a student after it is submitted.

  • Non-Custodial Parent Information Inquiries

DFA staff will not release student financial aid information to the non-custodial parent(s) of a student considered dependent for financial aid purposes.

  • Parents of Independent Students Information Inquiries

DFA staff will not release student financial aid information to the parent(s) or spouse of a student considered independent for financial aid purposes.

  • Student Written Requests

A student may submit a written and signed request for the release of student financial aid information from DFA that specifies the following: (1) exactly what information is to be released; (2) the time period the information is for; and (3) the reason the information is being sought. This information will only be provided to the student.

  • Third-Party Requests

No student-specific financial aid information is provided to any third party by phone or in person.

DFA Identity Confirmation Practices

  • Student Identity Confirmation in Person

The preferred method for confirming student identity is the student's personal presentation of a valid Purdue University Identification card, driver's license, or passport (picture ID).

  • Student Identity Confirmation on the Telephone

Over the phone, student identity will be verified by asking a series of questions: full name, date of birth, and student identification number. To preserve the privacy of student records, DFA reserves the right to deny telephone service to a caller if the identity of the caller cannot be confirmed or is in doubt.

  • Student Identify Confirmation through Email

Students seeking information specific to their account through email must inquire through their purdue.edu email account and include their name, Purdue University ID number, and date of birth.

  • Dependent Student Custodial Parent Confirmation in Person

Parents of dependent students seeking information specific to their child's account through email must inquire through the parent email account that they provided on the student's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and include their name and date of birth and the student's name and Purdue University ID number and date of birth.

  • Dependent Student Custodial Parent Confirmation on the Telephone

Custodial parent identity will be verified by asking a series of questions: full name of student and parent, student identification number, and parent date of birth as reported on the FAFSA. To preserve the privacy of student records, DFA reserves the right to deny telephone service to a caller if the identity of the caller cannot be confirmed or is in doubt.

  • Dependent Student Custodial Parent Confirmation through Email

Custodial parent identity will be verified by asking a series of questions including but not limited to: full name of student and parent, student identification number, and parent date of birth as reported on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

  • Independent Student Parents on the Telephone or in Person

No student-specific financial aid information will be released to the spouse or parents of students considered independent for financial aid purposes, including parents that are required to provide information on the FAFSA for Health Professions Loan Program purposes. Students that want to share their financial aid status and eligibility information with unauthorized individuals are encouraged to call or come in with that individual, or forward copies of financial aid information available on their myPurdue account. DFA does not provide a blanket release form authorizing the release of information to unauthorized individuals. Students can request single release authorize DFA in order to complete applications for private scholarship or government benefits. The Office of the Bursar allows a student to authorize a user to view bills and make payments. More information about authorized user access is available at www.purdue.edu/bursar/payments/myPurdue_instructions.html.

Restricting Information Access

The Purdue University Division of Financial Aid uses the information students provide on the Free Application of Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine eligibility to receive federal, state, and institutional student financial aid and the amount of eligibility. Sections 483 and 484 of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, gives the Federal Student Aid Programs (FSAP) and DFA the authority to ask students and parents these questions, and to collect the SSN of students and parents. DFA, FSAP, and your state aid agency uses the SSN to verify, identify, and retrieve records, and may request the SSN again for these purposes.

Without student consent, FSAP may disclose information provided on the FAFSA to entities under a published routine use. Under such a routine use, FSAP may disclose information to third parties that are authorized to assist them in administering the above programs; to other federal agencies under computer matching programs, such as those with the Internal Revenue Service, Social Security Administration, Selective Service System, Immigration and Naturalization Service, and Veterans Administration; to a student's parents or spouse; and to members of Congress if a student asks them to help with student aid questions.

If the federal government, the U.S. Department of Education, or an employee of the U.S. Department of Education is involved in litigation, FSAP may send information to the Department of Justice, or a court of adjudicative body, if the disclosure is related to financial aid and certain conditions are met. In addition, FSAP may send student information to a foreign, federal, state, or local enforcement agency if the information submitted indicates a violation, or potential violation of law, for which that agency has jurisdiction for investigation or prosecution. Finally, FSAP may send information regarding a claim that is determined to be valid and overdue to a consumer report agency. This information includes identifiers from the record; the amount, status, and history of the claim, and the program under which the claim arose.

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Repeat Coursework

Changes in federal regulations impact how financial aid can be used for classes taken more than once.

You CAN receive financial aid:

  • To repeat a course that has already been passed (D- or higher) only one additional time. Any repeated attempts after that will not be eligible for financial aid. Note that this applies even if you earn a failing grade (F) or withdraw (W) during the second attempt.
  • As many times as necessary to repeat a course in which the only previous grade earned has been a failing grade (F).
  • Even if a passing grade has been earned for certain repeat courses, such as Band or thesis hours, due to different subject content being studied in each term.

All courses previously taken, even if financial aid was not used, are compared against the current semester to determine if it is a repeated class and whether it can be paid for using financial aid. Your financial aid may be recalculated if you take a class that is not eligible for financial aid. This policy does not provide exceptions if the repeat courses are taken to meet plan of study grade requirements, i.e. a grade of C or higher must be earned to count towards your major.

Example with MA 15900:

Term

Eligible for Funding?

Reason

Grade

Fall 2011

Yes

First Attempt

W

Spring 2012

Yes

Not Passed Before

F

Summer 2012

Yes

Not Passed Before

D

Fall 2012

Yes

First Repeat

D+

Spring 2013

No

Second Repeat

C

Example with MGMT 20000:

Term

Eligible for Funding?

Reason

Grade

Spring 2012

Yes

First Attempt

D-

Fall 2012

Yes

First Repeat

D-

Spring 2013

No

Second Repeat

D

Example with COM 11400:

Term

Eligible for Funding?

Reason

Grade

Summer 2012

Yes

First Attempt

F

Fall 2012

Yes

Not Passed Before

W

Spring 2013

Yes

Not Passed Before

D

Fall 2013

Yes

First Repeat

C-

Example with ENGL 42000:

Term

Eligible for Funding?

Reason

Grade

Fall 2012

Yes

First Attempt

D-

Spring 2013

Yes

First Repeat

W

Summer 2013

No

Second Repeat

C

Example with ENGR 10300:

Term

Eligible for Funding?

Reason

Grade

Fall 2011

Yes

First Attempt

W

Spring 2012

Yes

Not Passed Before

F

Fall 2012

Yes

Not Passed Before

F

Spring 2013

Yes

Not Passed Before

F

Fall 2013

Yes

Not Passed Before

C

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Required Enrollment

Eligibility for Federal and state of Indiana student aid at Purdue University ;will be based on the number of credit hours in which a student is enrolled and has initiated course participation as of the end of the fourth week of classes for the Fall or Spring semesters, and as of the end of the second week of classes of module 2 for each module of the Summer. If enrollment is reduced on or before a census date, Federal and state aid eligibility could be reduced or cancelled. If enrollment is increased after this date, financial aid eligibility is not automatically increased. For students enrolled at College of Technology Statewide sites, census dates vary based on the start of the enrollment period.

Note that if a student drops a course prior to specified dates, but remains enrolled at minimum enrollment level, there is no impact on amount of financial aid.

Undergraduate Enrollment Levels For Financial Aid Per Semester (including Summer School):

  • Full-time = 12 or more credits
  • Three-quarter-time = 9-11 credits
  • Half-time = 6-8 credits
  • Less-Than-Half-Time = 1-5 credits

Graduate Student Enrollment Levels for Financial Aid Per Semester:

  • Full-time = 8 or more credits (6 or more credits for summer)
  • Half-time = 4-7 credits (3 credits for summer)

Enrollment Level Impact on Aid Eligibility:

Federal assistance includes the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant,Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Parent PLUS Loan, and/or Federal Work-Study. These types of aid usually require at least half time enrollment at Purdue (6 or more credit hours for undergraduates and 4 or more credit hours for graduate students).

Those eligible for the Federal Pell Grant must maintain their planned enrollment or the Pell Grant value must be "prorated" based on the following enrollment levels:

  • Full time: 12 or more credits, full time award
  • Three-quarter time: 9 to 11 credits, 75% of a full time award
  • Half time: 6 to 8 credits, 50% of a full time award
  • Less than half time: 1 to 5 credits, 25% of a full time award.

State of Indiana aid includes the Higher Education Award and the Part-Time Grant program. The Higher Education Award requires a minimum of 12 credit hour enrollment.

If you have any questions about how your enrollment level impacts your aid eligibility, contact the Division of Financial Aid at (765) 494-5050 or facontact@purdue.edu.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress

The Division of Financial Aid (DFA) is required by federal regulation to determine whether a student is enrolled in a degree-seeking program and is meeting satisfactory academic progress requirements. DFA recalculates the academic progress status for students after final grades post each semester. Students need to become familiar with the three components of the satisfactory academic progress policy.

View Purdue's detailed SAP policy.

SAP Status:

Eligibility for Financial Aid:

Satisfactory

Eligible

Warning/Alert

Eligible - close to not meeting requirements

Probation

Eligible - one semester

Denial

Not eligible

Download the SAP Appeal Form and review the appeal procedures.

Academic resources are available to help students meet SAP requirements.

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Verification

Introduction

Verification is a process that the Division of Financial Aid conducts on a percentage of students in order to comply with federal regulations. Purdue is required to verify the information provided on the FAFSA with tax documents to ensure students are awarded properly with financial aid eligibility. If selected for verification, our office will request information regarding the information reported on your FAFSA application.

Verification Requirements

This request may be satisfied by updating estimated tax information on the FAFSA using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool*, or by providing a copy of federal or Puerto Rican tax transcripts, or foreign tax transcripts. Student information is always required for records chosen for verification. If the student is dependent, parent information will also be required. Custodial parents who are remarried must also provide their current spouse's income information. Verification of reported assets may also be requested.

*preferred method

Processing Timeframe

Once our office has received the requested verification information, It will take 1-2 business days to review the documentation and compare it to the FAFSA. If the information on the FAFSA does not match the verification documentation, we will update the FAFSA data and revise financial aid eligibility accordingly. These revisions typically take 7-10 business days after the initial review of verification information. The student will receive a notification through their Purdue email account after revisions have been made and will be directed to view their myPurdue account to view any changes to their financial aid awards.

Important Notes

  • By submitting the FAFSA, you agreed to provide any additional information that the school requests.
  • It is your responsibility to comply in a timely manner to maintain financial aid eligibility.
  • Verification must be completed before the last day of the student's enrollment. However, please be advised that financial aid will not credit a student's bill if outstanding verification requirements exist. Additionally, financial aid is awarded on a first-come first-serve basis; eligibility may decrease if funding is no longer available at the time verification documents are submitted.
  • To avoid unnecessary delays and further requests, do not ;send our office verification documents unless they have been requested of you specifically by Purdue University. The Federal Processor may indicate that your record was selected for verification; this is separate from Purdue's request for verification.

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Appeals

Appeal Procedures

Financial aid policies and procedures are established to insure equitable treatment for all students qualified to receive assistance. Because of individual circumstances, a particular student may feel an exception to policies and procedures is warranted. The appeals procedures provide the student with an opportunity to request such an exception. These steps should be followed:

  1. Discuss your situation with a financial aid administrator. In most cases, a counselor will be able to resolve your questions. If you would like to make a change in your financial aid, or you would like to provide us with new information, the administrator will explain what type of revision, if any, is possible. If the revision you are requesting is denied, not DFA policy, or requires special consideration, you may appeal the decision to the Division of Financial Aid Review Committee.
  2. The Review Committee meets once each week and consists of three Financial Aid staff members. If you decide to request that the Review Committee consider your appeal you must submit a written statement. This statement should explain in detail what type of revision you are requesting and why. You should also attach any relevant documentation such as copies of medical bills, letters from academic advisors, or letters from parents. Bring your written request back to the counselor with whom you originally discussed your financial situation. The counselor will submit your appeal to the Review Committee and you will receive a notice of the decision within two weeks. This decision notice will explain the Review Committee decision and the reasons why that decision was made. If you have any questions regarding the decision, you should then make an appointment to discuss your situation with the Chairperson of the Review Committee and/or the person who signed the Review Committee's written reply.
  3. A final appeal may be made to the Executive Director of Financial Aid. After receiving a denial notice and discussing your situation with the Chairperson of the Review Committee, information will be provided concerning your option to appeal the denial decision to the Executive Director of Financial Aid. The Executive Director will review your financial situation and the previous Review Committee decision and provide you with a written reply. This decision is final.

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Budget Adjustment

Introduction

The Division of Financial Aid (DFA) calculates an estimated Cost of Attendance (COA), or budget, for financial aid applicants based on federal guidelines. Financial aid is awarded up to the COA but cannot exceed it. The COA includes direct and indirect educationally-related expenses. The DFA surveys students every 3 years to help estimate indirect costs. More detailed information about the COA is available here. Note that tuition and fee amounts may vary based on the enrolled program.

Please keep in mind that the COA only accounts for the months in which you are enrolled. For instance, if you only enroll in classes for the fall semester, your COA would be approximately half of what is shown in the example. If your eligible educationally-related expenses exceed these estimated costs, you should speak with a DFA Counselor to receive the appeal form and instructions. It may be possible to increase your COA, and thus increase the amount of financial aid you are eligible to receive by completing the Budget Adjustment Appeal and returning it to our office.

We can consider the following categories:

  • Off campus-housing: rent, utilities, homeowner's/renter's insurance, internet, food
    • Documentation must show your name and monthly charges
    • Examples of acceptable documentation include the lease agreement, receipts, bills, cancelled checks (additional documentation may be requested)

NOTE: Increased on-campus housing expenses do not need reported through this form for additional loan consideration. Contact our office to determine if you are eligible for more loans as a result of on-campus housing rates.

  • Transportation: car insurance, gas
    • Documentation must include a written statement detailing the necessity of a car for any transportation expense
    • Examples of acceptable documentation include vehicle insurance premiums including dates of coverage, receipts (additional documentation may be requested)
  • Day care expenses for dependents:
    • Documentation must show the child's name, age, and monthly expense for each child
    • Examples of acceptable documentation include a statement from daycare provider, cancelled checks, receipts (additional documentation may be requested)
  • Medical expenses paid:
    • Documentation must show out-of-pocket expenses and the date paid
    • Examples of acceptable documentation include receipts, cancelled checks (additional documentation may be requested)
    • For recurring medical expenses, you must include a letter from your medical provider that verifies the monthly charge
  • Miscellaneous/recreational: personal, clothing/laundry, cell phone/telephone
    • Examples of acceptable documentation include cell phone or telephone bill, receipts (additional documentation may be requested)
  • Books/supplies:
    • Required documentation: receipts (additional documentation may be requested)

We cannot consider the following types of expenses:

  • Those incurred or paid by roommates
  • Those incurred for spouses, children, or other family members
  • Car payments or credit card payments
  • Expenses incurred outside of the current enrollment period

Deadlines and Timeframes

  • Budget Adjustment Appeals will be available one month into the fall semester
  • For fall only enrollment, Budget Adjustment Appeals must be submitted by the last Friday in November.
  • For spring only, academic year, or summer enrollment, Budget Adjustments Appeals must be submitted by the second Friday in April.
  • Processing takes approximately 3 weeks from the time the appeal and all required documentation is received by our office

Important Notes
All expenses submitted for a Budget Adjustment Appeal must be incurred and paid during your enrollment period. Documentation showing expenses outside of the enrollment period (i.e. car insurance coverage for 12 months) will be pro-rated based upon your actual enrollment

The expenses submitted with the appeal must be greater than the amounts listed in your myPurdue account to change aid eligibility. To view the estimated cost of attendance calculated by our office, log into myPurdue. Click the Financial tab. Select Cost of Attendance from the Quick Links box. Select the appropriate aid year from the drop-down, and click submit.

A Budget Adjustment Appeal can only be used to increase Federal Work Study or loan eligibility. Students who have already borrowed the maximum grade level limit for Stafford Loans will be offered Parent PLUS Loan or Private Loan eligibility, both of which are subject to credit approval.

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Special Circumstance Appeals

Introduction

A Special Circumstance for Parents (SCP) or Special Circumstance for Students (SCS) may be used when a family's financial status is not accurately reflected on the FAFSA. Our office can evaluate your circumstance to determine if it could have an impact on the type or amount of financial aid that is available. Documentation is required for all SCP/SCS Appeals.

Allowable Circumstances

Purdue Division of Financial Aid will consider making adjustments for the following situations:

  • Income loss due to unemployment, job change, one-time income adjustment, loss of untaxed income, divorce, or death
  • Extraordinary expenses including educational loan payments, out of pocket medical/dental expenses, or out of pocket costs for a parent attending college at least half-time

Non-allowable Circumstances

Purdue Division of Financial Aid will not consider making adjustments for the following situations:

  • Bankruptcy
  • Loss of overtime or bonus pay
  • Consumer debt (credit cards, car payments)
  • "Life style" choices, including high mortgage payments or second vehicles
  • Any circumstance experienced by a non-custodial parent (not listed on the FAFSA)
  • One-time income used for non-life essential items (e.g. family vacation)

Appeal Requirements

To complete a Special Circumstance Appeal, you must:

  • Speak to a financial aid administrator to determine if you qualify to receive an appeal.
  • Have the current year's FAFSA completed.
  • Complete the verification process; if the IRS Data Retrieval feature is not used to complete or update the FAFSA, tax transcripts and household verification will be required before we are able to process a SCP/SCS Appeal.
  • Be included on the FAFSA information.
  • Have a circumstance that is not already reflected on the FAFSA.
  • Provide all required documentation and any additional information that is requested.

Deadlines and Timeframes for 2014-15

  • For fall only enrollment, SCP/SCS Appeals must be submitted by November 14, 2014
  • For spring only, academic year, or summer enrollment, SCP/SCS Appeals must be submitted by April 3, 2015
  • Processing takes approximately 3 weeks from the time the appeal is submitted and all required documents requested by the Financial Aid office have been received.

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Purdue University Division of Financial Aid, Schleman Hall, Room 305, 375 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-5050

© 2015 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Divison of Financial Aid

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