REGISTRATION

register

Registration will open in spring of 2015

Contact Kris Swank at kswank@purdue.edu or 765-494-4674

REGISTRATION Q&A

Q: Do you provide official invitation letter for visa purpose?
A: Yes. We do provide invitation or visa letters to anyone with a paid registration. Contact Kris Swank at kswank@purdue.edu with the following information: Name as it appears on your passport, your passport number and your mailing address.

Q: What is the cost of the symposium?
A: Full registration is $325. Student registration is $150. Advocate Registration is $150. IBCN Member $150.
Registration covers most of the food during the symposium except for the Friday Evening Dinner, which you will need to register for and will cost $50.

lodging

HOTELS

Hotel information will be coming in the spring 2015

 

travel

VISA AND PASSPORT INFORMATION

Q: Do you provide official invitation letter for visa purpose?
A: Yes. We do provide invitation or visa letters to anyone with a paid registration. Contact Kris Swank at kswank@purdue.edu with the following information: Your name as it appears on your passport, your passport number and your mailing address.

Q: Who will need a visa to enter Guadeloupe?
A: Nationalities not listed require a visa. Listing

Q: Where do I get information on a Guadeloupe visa?
A: Here is a website to help you. Just fill in the information at the top as to your citizenship and where you are living: https://guadeloupe.visahq.com/

Flight Information

All flights into Guadeloupe arrive at La Raizet airport in Pointe a Pitre on the Grand-Terre island. The airport has been undergoing a complete makeover so expect a little dust at times.

I found two main airlines that fly into La Raizet. They are American Airlines and Air France.

Traveling from Europe:

Air France
Air France has flights to arrive in La Raizet on September 30 at 2:25pm. But many of the Air France flights requires you to change airports in Paris, France. You must collect your baggage before proceeding to your connecting flight.

Traveling from the United States:

American Airlines
Flights from the United States will take 2 days. One getting you to San Juan or Miami the first day, and then the following day you depart San Juan/Miami to arrive at La Raizet. I could not find a flight from American Airlines that would get you there on September 30.

American Airlines has no flights to the La Raizet airport on 9/30. Flights arriving on October 1, are later in the afternoon.

Departing La Raizet airport - there are no American Airline flights departing PTP on 10/4 or 10/6 or 10/7
Only return is Monday, Oct 5 or Thursday Oct 8.

Air France
Air France has flights departing in Miami on 9/28 and/or 9/29 at 9:05am that will will arrive into La Raizet at 1:45pm the same day. There are no flights avaialable on Air France for Sunday, September 27 or Wednesday, September 30.

When traveling Air France, you will most likely have to change airports in Paris, France. You must collect your baggage before proceeding to your connecting flight.

Departing La Raizet airport will need to be on Sunday, Oct 4 or Monday Oct 5 at 4:20pm and arriving back into Miami that evening at 9:20pm. (prices are very high on Oct 3 and Oct 6).

local area

Gosier: maybe one of the most interesting places of Guadeloupe to enjoy nightlife. (You can enter most nightclubs with proper clothes, that is, no sneakers, no shorts)

Other destinations

Don't miss the spectacular waterfalls in the jungle of Basse-Terre. Some are within 5-10 minutes walking distance from the nearest parking lot, some require at least 3-4 hours of hiking (those are, of course less frequented by other tourists and you might find yourself alone at a spectacular waterfall in the middle of nowhere - an amazing experience!).

The local rum distilleries offer tours (check for opening times as they may vary from season to season) which are certainly worth the while since rum production is a very integral part of Guadeloupe's economy. And sampling the local rums is definitely worth the while.
Even though they might not be the best way to get around the island, a ride on the bus is still an experience you should not miss. Cheap, full of locals, conducted by fearless drivers, you can enjoy the beautiful Caribbean panorama to the sound of Guadeloupean zouk music. Some routes are not good for passengers with weak stomachs. If you're careful, you can hitch a free ride on the back for some "realistic" tourist experience.

Buy

  • Characteristic of the Antilles is the colorful tiled Madras fabric.
  • The local made rum is also distinctive and very cheap to buy. Certainly worth sampling (during an evening at one of the beautiful beaches or at home when showing vacation pictures to friends and family to warm everyone up to caribbean temperature)

  • Eat

    Not to be missed, the plate Colombo (chicken, rice, curry), imported from India, has become the typical regional plate. The expected cost for food is anywhere from $4.99 to $38.99

    Drink

    The local drink is white rum. Do try the "'Ti Punch" (Petit Punch/small Punch) (rum, lime, and sugar cane/brown sugar). Packs a wallop, so be prepared to melt into the island way of life.

    Stay safe

    Bring lots of sunscreen! There are Metropole-style pharmacies which carry top of the line French sunscreen, that can be expensive.

    Also, keep hydrated, especially when hiking in the mountainous areas. A hat is often a good thing to have because the sun can get extremely hot.

    Stay healthy

    There is no particular disease but you should protect yourself from the sun. Sanitary and medical facilities in Guadeloupe are good. Tap water is usually safe for consumption. Public sources of water are unsafe if labeled with "Eau non potable" (no drinking water).

    Respect

    While officially a part of France, the country does not have a very europeanized way of life. In fact, life in the Caribbean has a much slower pace. Busses run very infrequently, taxis are hard to find, smaller stores open or close not always on time, queuing in stores is sometimes very time consuming... Try to fall into the local pace and do not complain about minor annoyances as Guadeloupeans will see that as an offense to their way of life. And they are proud of the distinction between caribbean and metropolian (French) life style!