Manure Management Planner Help

Contents


Important Notes On This Version

  1. State-specific notes for all states are included in the help. Please be sure to review your state's notes before using MMP.

  2. Version 0.38 of MMP eliminates the need to download and install the obsolete Microsoft WinHelp to display program help. When you click a Help button or press F1, MMP will open the help in your browser from the MMP Web site.

    Note that you can display help locally too (for example, if you don't have an Internet connection): In Windows Explorer, double-click file mmphelp.html in MMP's install folder.

  3. In version 0.38 of MMP, the sample plans and custom tools have been moved from MMP's install folder to C:\ProgramData\Manure Management Planner to make them more readily accessible. If you need to access a file in the Samples or Custom folders, look for them under C:\ProgramData. For more information, see the list of distribution files.

  4. Version 0.37 of MMP introduces version 3 of the national-format CNMP template and other plan templates. Once your plan is complete you can generate a CNMP or other plan document by choosing the appropriate document type from the list under National USDA-NRCS Format Document Maker on the Tools dialog's Custom panel. Instructions for completing the plan document once it's been generated are also available from this list.

  5. Starting with version 0.25, MMP now includes built-in RUSLE2 for estimating soil erosion. The standalone RUSLE2 does not need to be installed on your computer, although you can install it if you want. You can use your own RUSLE2 database (.gdb) with MMP or use an up-to-date .gdb created for each plan by the University of Missouri's "clipper" Web app:

    For more information, click the RUSLE2 button at the top of MMP's Crops panel, then click the Help button in the RUSLE2 Data Editor.

  6. With each release of MMP, some soil surveys will have been updated. In updated surveys, some or all of the map units may have been renamed. If you have previously created plans in any of these updated surveys, you may need to re-select some soils on the Fields panel. This is because some of the map units in the old surveys may no longer appear in the updated surveys. If this is the case with any of your plans, MMP will delete the invalid (obsolete) soils from your plan when you next open it and then give you an opportunity to view or print a report of all affected fields to help you determine what new soils you should select.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What software does MMP require to run?

    MMP runs under Windows 7 and later. No other software is required for basic program operation.

    If you want to use a custom tool, you will need any software that the tool uses. Most custom tools generate a report using Microsoft Word. A few custom tools require Microsoft Access. To see what software a tool requires, look on the Tools dialog box's Custom panel.

  2. What changes does MMP's installer make to my system?

    MMP's installer does not add or replace any files in the Windows or system folders. The only changes the installer makes are the following:

  3. Can I uninstall MMP?

    Yes. If you need to remove MMP from your system, use the Windows Control Panel to uninstall MMP. This removes the items listed in the previous question. Be sure to exit MMP first before uninstalling it. Also, if more than one version of MMP is listed, uninstall the highest numbered version first.

    Uninstalling MMP does not delete or move plan files that you've created. If you reinstall MMP later, just navigate to where you saved your plan files to open them.

    Important! Sometimes you may want to uninstall only an older version of MMP and keep the newer version. Uninstalling the older version may delete the MMP shortcut from the Windows desktop and Start menu. If this happens, simply run the newer version's installer again to restore the deleted shortcuts.

  4. Is there a Mac or Linux version of MMP available?

    No. MMP is a Windows-only program.

  5. Is MMP a recordkeeping program?

    MMP itself is not a recordkeeping program in the usual sense, although you enter some of the same data that you would for farm recordkeeping. MMP is a planning program that helps determine if an animal feeding operation has enough storage, equipment, and spreadable acres to handle the manure produced by the operation's animals during the period of the plan.

    MMP does include the Manure Application Recordkeeping Tool (MART) for entering information about actual manure applications. This tool draws on field, storage and equipment data entered in MMP. The Recordkeeping Tool can be found on the Custom panel of the Tools dialog box.

  6. Can MMP be used with other software?

    Yes. There are several ways that MMP can be used with other software:

  7. Where should I save my plan files?

    When you save a new plan file, you can save it anywhere you want. However, here are a few suggestions:

  8. How do I move a plan to another computer?

    Simply copy the plan file (.mmp extension) to the other computer. Remember that the other computer must have the same or a more recent version of MMP installed in order to open the plan file.

    If you entered RUSLE2 data into your plan, you'll also need to copy the RUSLE2 database file (.gdb) that the plan references to the other computer, or else the other computer must have a RUSLE2 database containing the same RUSLE2 data that your plan references.

    Tip: You can send a plan file as an attachment to an e-mail message. It's a good idea to zip up the plan file and send the zipped file to prevent the plan file from being modified in transit or by the recipient's e-mail system. If you include the RUSLE2 .gdb, zipping will reduce the size of the attachment considerably.

  9. How do I import my soil test data into MMP?

    MMP can import field data from dBASE files that are in its standard import format. Click the Import dBASE Field Data File button on the Tools dialog's Import panel to start MMP's Import Wizard, then select the dBASE file to import. You can also import field data from comma-separated-values (CSV) files created by Excel and other programs.

    Note: MMP's standard dBASE import format is documented in file ImportDbfSpec.doc in MMP's TechDocs folder. For an example of a standard dBASE field data import file, see file ImportExample_IN.dbf in the Samples folder.

    Tip: To use the field identification from a soil test data file in your plan, import the data into a new plan that does not have any field data entered yet.

  10. How do I import data from the USDA-NRCS Customer Service Toolkit into MMP?

    You can import Toolkit customer data into an MMP plan as follows:

  11. How many years should my plan be?

    In general, you should have enough years in your plan to handle your longest crop rotation. If almost all of your fields are on a two-year rotation, you might be able to do just a two-year plan, since very little will be different between years 1 and 3 or years 2 and 4. If you have fields that are on a three- or four-year rotation, you will probably want to have a longer plan. A five-year plan is useful if you want to see what the projected impact of manure application will be on soil test levels after a couple of rotations.

  12. What month should I start my plan?

    Pick a month so you can plan all manure and fertilizer applications intended for the first crop. For example, if no manure is applied during the growing season until Sept., then July, Aug. or Sept. would be a good starting month. You can also start the plan in winter or spring if no nutrient applications or tillage operations are made the previous fall.

    Note that if you start a plan in late summer or early fall, you should only plan nutrient applications for the following year's crops, not for the current year's crops. For example, if you start a plan in July in order to plan manure applications that are normally made immediately after wheat harvest, don't plan any nutrient applications made to growing crops in the starting year's July or August. To determine if you should plan a nutrient application in the starting year of a plan that starts in late summer or early fall, ask yourself what crop it's targeting. If the target crop is grown in the plan's starting year, don't plan the application since that crop is not in the plan.

  13. What field identification system should I use?

    You can use whatever system you want to identify fields. For each field, you enter a main field ID and an optional subfield ID if you've subdivided the fields and are managing the subfields separately. In general, a subfield is the smallest manageable unit in the field.

    A field ID can be up to 15 characters long and a subfield ID can be up to 5 characters long. The only requirement is that the combined field ID and subfield ID must be unique within the plan.

  14. Why aren't there any soils in the Soil Type column's pick list on the Fields panel?

    Make sure you've selected a county on the General panel. The pick list only contains soils that are valid for that county.

  15. How do I decide which soil type to select for a field?

  16. How do I select the soil test data's units on the Soil Tests panel?

    Check the Levels Are In Lb/A box if a field's P, K, Mg, Ca, Na and Al soil test levels are in pounds per acre; leave the box unchecked if the test levels are in ppm. All five values must be in the same units.

    To convert a soil test level that's expressed in ppm to Lb/A, multiply by 2.

    To convert a soil test level that's expressed in Lb/A to ppm, divide by 2.

  17. How do I override MMP's default fertilizer recommendations?

    MMP's fert recs are based on your state's extension recommendations. If you have custom fert recs that you prefer to use instead, enter your recs in the appropriate Custom columns on the Crops panel. MMP will use your custom fert recs instead of its default fert recs. Be sure you document the source of your custom recs by entering that information in the Source column.

    To view the source of MMP's default fert recs, click on a default fert rec cell. MMP displays the source in the status line. This source is usually an extension publication that you can go to for more information.

  18. How do I enter a field's previous crop for the first year of a plan?

    You don't need to enter a previous crop for a field's first year. MMP attempts to determine the first year's previous crop by looking at the field's crop rotation. Once you've entered crops for enough years, MMP can determine the rotation; it will then update the first year's N rec, taking any N credit if applicable.

    If a field's planned crop rotation isn't the same as its historical rotation, or if you don't think MMP is determining the first year's previous crop properly, you can add or subtract the N credit from the first year's default N rec and enter your N rec in the first year's Custom N Rec column. This will override the Default N Rec column. Be sure to document the reason for the custom N rec in the Source column.

    To determine the amount of N credit and whether the crop can take a credit, consult the indicated source of the default N recommendation (displayed on the status bar when you click on the crop's Default N Rec column).

  19. How do I enter a double crop or a cover crop?

    On the Crops panel, enter the second crop in the Planned Crop column, then scroll the grid to the right and enter the first crop or cover crop in the Planned Cover Crop or First Crop column.

    MMP considers a cover crop to be a non-harvested crop, so don't enter a yield goal for a cover crop if it won't be harvested.

    MMP considers a first crop to be the first harvested crop in a double-cropped year, so be sure to enter a yield goal for a first crop. If the field will have only one harvested crop in the current year, enter it as the Planned Crop, even if it's planted in the fall.

  20. How do I override MMP's estimated manure analysis and production?

    Scroll the grid to the right on the Analysis panel and enter a measured manure analysis and production. Be sure to document the source and date of your analysis by entering a lab name or other information in the Source column.

  21. How does MMP estimate how much nitrogen will be lost from manure applied to a field?

    MMP uses state-specific N availability factors to estimate the amount of manure N available to crops. To see the source of these factors, click on a manure application's Avail N As Applied column on the Nutrient Mgmt panel. The source will be displayed on the status bar. You can also click the Storage Info button on the Storage panel and find the source in note 2 at the bottom of the report.

  22. How does MMP determine what crop the manure is fertilizing?

    MMP assumes the following for most states:

  23. What does it mean when a Field Status cell turns red?

    When the background color of a Field Status cell (middle grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel) is red, this means that no more manure is needed that month, either because of an earlier manure application that year or a multi-year application in a previous year. In general, you should only apply manure in months with a white background. Note that MMP does not highlight months following custom rate applications because it doesn't know the intended nutrient target with custom rates.

  24. How do I show manure that will be exported or imported from the operation?

    If your plan will be exporting some of the manure it produces or importing manure from another operation, click on a Storage Status cell (top grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel) and press F2. This brings up the Manure Transfer Editor, where you can specify how much manure will be exported or imported that month for that storage. Click the Editor's Help button for more information.

  25. How can I sort one of the data entry grids?

    You can sort the Fields, Assessment, Soil Tests, Storage, Animals, Analysis and Equipment grids by any column. Right-click on the header row of the column you want to sort the grid by and choose Sort Ascending or Sort Descending from the popup menu.

  26. How do I delete or insert a field?

    On the Fields panel, right-click the indicator column (») of the field you want to delete or the row where you want to insert a new field, then choose Delete Field or Insert Field from the popup menu.

  27. How can I see more columns in a grid to avoid scrolling left and right so much?

    Enlarge MMP's main window by dragging its borders or click the maximize box in the upper right corner of the main window to use the entire screen.

  28. How can I avoid re-entering duplicate field data?

    If you have data that's the same for several fields (for example, field ID's, farm ID's, FSA ID's, yield goals), you can copy and paste this data between grid cells using the Windows clipboard. For example, with a field that's been divided into subfields, enter the field ID and subfield ID for the first subfield, then move back to the field ID column and press Ctrl+C. This copies the highlighted field ID to the Windows clipboard. Now move to the field ID cell of the next subfield's row in the grid and press Ctrl+V. This pastes the clipboard contents (the field ID) into the field ID cell. Tab to the next column and enter the subfield ID. Repeat this for each subfield that has the same field ID.

    Tip: You can also right-click in a grid cell and choose the Copy or Paste command from the popup menu.

  29. Why aren't the numbers right justified in the columns of the built-in reports?

    This is a known problem with the rich text control included with Windows.

    For best results, you can view the report in Microsoft Word by checking the View Report With Word box on the Tools dialog's Reports panel. You can also save the report to a Rich Text Format file in the Preview dialog box, then open the file in Word for viewing and printing.

  30. Why don't the columns line up properly in my reports?

    Your storage and equipment ID's may be too long. These reports try to pack in a lot of information and don't have much room to display these ID's. One solution is to keep storage and equipment ID's to no more that 15 mixed-case characters.

  31. How can I print a blank form for use in recording plan data away from the computer?

    Open file BlankForm.doc in MMP's Samples folder and print it with Word. To see an example of the data collection form with data, open file SampleForm.doc in MMP's Samples folder.


Definitions

MMP displays the name of the current plan file on the title bar at the top of the main window. If [New Plan] is displayed, the plan has not yet been saved to a file.


You operate MMP by clicking on the row of buttons at the bottom of the main window. Each button corresponds to a command such as New or Open.

Some command buttons may be disabled at certain times. For example, you can't choose some of the buttons until you've first created or opened a plan file.


A dialog box is a window you use to enter information or change settings. With most command buttons, when you click the button, MMP displays a dialog box. For example, when you click New, MMP displays the New Manure Management Plan dialog box.

Press the Tab key to move to a dialog box's next input box and Shift+Tab to move to the previous input box, or click on an input box to jump to it. Click a dialog box's OK button to close the dialog box and accept the current settings, or click the Cancel button to close a dialog box and abandon any changes you've made to its settings.


A data panel is a window containing input boxes for viewing and entering plan data. MMP has 10 data panels, one for each type of data that you enter. Once you've created or opened a plan file, you can click on the tabs labeled General, Fields, Assessment, Soil Tests, and so on to view the corresponding data panel.

Press the Tab or Enter key to move to a panel's next input box and Shift+Tab to move to the previous input box, or click on a panel's input box to jump to it.


A grid allows you to view and enter data in a table of rows and columns. Click on a cell in the grid to move to that cell. Press the Tab or Enter key to move to the next column, Shift+Tab to move to the previous column, the down arrow to move to the next row, and the up arrow to move to the previous row. You can also click on a column's header to move to that column or on the indicator column at the left side of the grid to move to a particular row.

If there are more rows or columns than will fit in the grid, use the grid's scroll bars to scroll the grid up and down or left and right.


MMP uses the status bar at the bottom of the main window to display a brief description of the type of data expected for the current input box or grid column.


Initialization settings specific to each state are stored in a file with an .mmi extension. Initialization files are located in the program's Lookup folder. MMP must be able to find a state's initialization file in order to create or open a plan file for that state.


Data for each state's soils are stored in a file with an .mms extension. Soil files are located in the program's Lookup folder. MMP must be able to find a state's soil file in order to create or open a plan file for that state.


MMP stores the data you enter for a manure management plan in a file that has an .mmp extension. You can create more than one plan file, but you can only view and edit one file at a time.


A built-in report is a report that MMP can generate without using other software. These reports can be viewed, printed or saved to a Rich Text Format file. Several built-in reports are listed on the Tools dialog box's Reports panel.


A custom tool is a report or tool developed with other software. MMP's custom tools are listed on the Tools dialog box's Custom panel. When you select a tool on the Custom panel, MMP indicates what software is required to run the tool. This software is not included with MMP; you must obtain and install the software yourself to run the tool.

Information about custom tools is stored in files with an .mmt extension. MMP's standard set of custom reports are defined in file StndRpts.mmt. State-specific custom tools are defined in a separate file for each state (for example, tools specific to Indiana might be defined in file IN_NatPlans.mmt).


A field's manure application priority is determined by considering the relative importance of several factors, such as driving distance between field and manure storage, N need, soil P and K test levels, and how recently the field has been manured.


A Rich Text Format file is a document that can be opened, edited and printed by many word processors. A Rich Text Format file has an .rtf extension.


An Access file is a standard type of database file used by many other programs. If you need to work with your plan data using other software, you can export it to an Access file by clicking the Export Plan's Data To Access Database button on the Tools dialog box's Export panel. After exporting, you can open the exported file with other software. An Access file has an .mdb extension.


A dBASE file is a standard type of database file used by many other programs. If you need to work with your plan data using other software, you can export it to dBASE files by clicking the Export Plan's Data To dBASE Files button on the Tools dialog box's Export panel. After exporting, you can open or import the exported files with other software. A dBASE file has a .dbf extension.


Automation is a mechanism built into Windows that allows one program to manipulate another by remote control. MMP can be operated remotely by programs that have been specifically programmed to do so.


Tips For New Users

Be sure to review this list before using MMP.
  1. Review MMP's Getting Started guide, which is installed with MMP. This guide will serve as an introduction to MMP if you've never used it before. You can access the guide from MMP's About box or double-click on file MmpGettingStarted.doc in MMP's install folder.

    At a minimum, be sure to read the following sections:

  2. To familiarize yourself with the program before you actually start entering your own plan data, open one of the sample plans that are installed with MMP. Click the Open button at the bottom of MMP's main window, navigate to MMP's Samples folder, and select one of the sample plan files located there.

  3. Review your state's notes before you start creating your own plans.

  4. If you've never created a plan with MMP before, run through these ten steps to getting started quickly. These steps are also included in the Getting Started guide.

  5. When you're ready to start entering your own data, review these quick tips on entering data. These tips are also included in the Getting Started guide.

  6. Periodically review the list of frequently asked questions (FAQs) for answers to many common questions.

  7. You don't necessarily have to fill in every column. Run the Check Plan's Data For Completeness report on the Tools dialog box's Reports tab to check if any required data is missing. Also, if a custom phosphorus index or other risk assessment tool is included with MMP for your state, review the tool's documentation (on the Tools dialog box's Custom tab) for any additional data that you'll need to enter on the Assessment panel.

  8. It's a good idea to enter and proof all input data before you begin making any planned fertilizer or manure applications on the Nutrient Mgmt panel.


Ten Steps To Getting Started Quickly

  1. Use MMP's help whenever you're uncertain about what to enter or how to proceed. Just press the F1 key to get help for the current command button, data panel, or dialog box. With a dialog box, you can also click its Help button. To see a list of major help topics, click the Help button at the bottom of MMP's main window.

  2. Click the New button at the bottom of MMP's main window to create a new manure management plan for entering your own plan data. Click the Open button to resume editing a previously saved plan.

  3. Once you've created a new plan, MMP displays the plan's General data panel, the first of several panels where you'll enter plan data. On the panel are input boxes where you enter data. Press the Tab or Enter key to move to the next input box and Shift+Tab to move to the previous input box, or click on an input box to jump to it. When you move to a different input box, MMP displays information about the input box on the status bar at the bottom of the main window.

  4. At the top of the panel are tabs labeled General, Fields, Assessment, Soil Tests, and so on. Click on a tab to view its corresponding data panel.

  5. Enter as much data as you can for your plan. You can always come back later and fill in the rest. For valuable tips on entering data and using MMP, refer to these quick tips.

  6. To save your plan to a file, click the Save button. To save your plan under another name (for example, to save a previous version or backup copy of your plan), click the Save As button.

  7. To check your data, click the Tools button and click Check Plan's Data For Completeness on the Tools dialog box's Reports panel.

  8. To generate a report showing your fields' nutrient needs, click the Tools button and click Report Annual Field Nutrient Needs.

  9. Use the Nutrient Mgmt panel to plan manure and fertilizer applications for each year in the plan and to plan any manure exports or imports.

  10. To generate a report showing your fields' nutrient balance as a result of the planned manure and fertilizer applications you entered on the Nutrient Mgmt panel, click the Tools button and click Report Field Nutrient Balance.


Quick Tips on Entering Data

  1. F1 for help. If in doubt about what to enter, press the F1 key to display help for the current data panel or dialog box.

  2. Status bar hints. When entering data, the status bar at the bottom of the main window displays a brief description of the type of data expected for the current input box or grid column. If in doubt about what to enter, glance down at the status bar for a hint.

  3. Undo. To undo typing changes that you've made to an input box, press Ctrl+Z. Note that this works only if you haven't moved from the input box. You can also right-click on the input box and choose Restore from the popup menu to undo typing changes.

  4. Copy and paste. To speed up entering the same data into several different input boxes, press Ctrl+C to copy the highlighted contents of an input box to the Windows clipboard. Then move to a different input box and press Ctrl+V to paste the clipboard contents into that input box. You can also right-click on an input box and choose Copy or Paste from the popup menu.

  5. Operating a pick list. To pull down a pick list with the mouse, click the arrow on the right side of the pick list box. To close the pick list without selecting anything, click the arrow again or click anywhere outside the pick list. With the keyboard, press Alt+Down arrow to pull down the list. Press Alt+Down arrow again to close the list.

  6. Pick list shortcut. To speed up entering data with a pick list, type the first letter of the desired item's name to select the first item that starts with that letter. If there's more than one item starting with that letter, you can continue typing that letter to cycle through the items. Note that this works even if the list is not pulled down. For example, when selecting crops, you can simply type C to select Corn without even pulling down the list. (When cycling through the list, don't pause between keystrokes. If you pause, the search is reset. Also, if you type quickly, you can continue typing additional letters of the desired item to jump to it. For example, quickly type CR to select CRP.)

  7. Blanking out a pick list. To blank out a pick list box, scroll to the top of the list and choose the first item, which will either be blank or, if the pick list is in a grid, (None). With a grid pick list, you can also just press the spacebar to select (None) without pulling down the list.

  8. Sorting a data entry grid. To sort the Fields, Assessment, Soil Tests, Storage, Animals, Analysis or Equipment grid, simply right-click on the header row of the column you want to sort the grid by and choose Sort Ascending or Sort Descending from the popup menu.

  9. Deleting or inserting a field. To delete a field or insert a new field, on the Fields panel right-click the indicator column (») of the field you want to delete or the row where you want to insert a new field. Choose Delete Field or Insert Field from the popup menu.

  10. County. In the County pick list, be sure to select the county where the operation is located, not the county of the operation's mailing address. If the operation has crop fields in more than one county, select the county for each field on the Fields panel.

  11. Irrigation. Since irrigation affects fertilizer recommendations in some states, be sure to indicate if a field is irrigated by checking the Irrigation column for the field on the Fields panel.

  12. Cover crop. If a field will have a non-harvested cover crop, scroll to the right on the Crops panel and select it in the Planned Cover Crop column for each year that it will be planted. Do not enter a yield goal. Note that fall-seeded single-cropped small grains that will be harvested the next year should be selected in the Planned Crop column.

  13. Proofing data. Enter as much of the operation's data as you can, then click the Tools button and click Check Plan's Data For Completeness to see if any required data is missing or if there are any inconsistencies in what you've entered. To check if you've entered enough soil test data, look at the Default N Rec, Default P2O5 Rec and Default K2O Rec columns on the Crops panel. If any of these is blank for a crop, then some of the field's soil test data (or the crop's yield goal) is missing.

  14. Close button to back out. Click the Close button to abandon any changes that you've made since the plan was last saved. You can use this the same way you use the File | Close menu command in a word processor or spreadsheet.

  15. State-specific notes. Be sure to review any notes specific to your state.

  16. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Read through this list of FAQs. The first time you read them, some questions or answers may not make much sense to you. Go back and read them again after you've used MMP for a while.

  17. Reporting problems. If you have questions about MMP or problems operating the software, please contact the authors.

  18. Making screenshots. To take a shot of the current MMP window or dialog box and paste the shot into a PowerPoint or Word document, press Alt+PrntScrn. To take a shot of the entire screen, press PrntScrn. This copies the window or screen contents to the Windows clipboard. In PowerPoint or Word, press Ctrl+V to paste the screenshot into the document.


Reporting Problems To The Authors

Manure Management Planner was developed in the Agronomy Dept. at Purdue University:

MMP's authors are:

If you have questions about MMP, please contact:

Important! Report problems with MMP as soon as possible via e-mail. However, please consult the help first before reporting problems -- answers to some of the most commonly asked questions can be found there.

If you report a problem, be sure to include the version of MMP that you're using (click the About button to see the program version) and the version of Windows that you're using (click the Information About Installed Software link in MMP's About box).

You can download the latest version of MMP from the following Web site:


Distribution Files

The following files are distributed with the Manure Management Planner (MMP) program. These files can be found in the folder you specified during installation or in one of its sub-folders. By default, MMP's install folder is under C:\Program Files (x86) (or C:\Program Files (x86)\USDA on USDA-NRCS computers). MMP also includes a number of templates that are located in the Custom folder under C:\ProgramData\Manure Management Planner. MMP's example files are located in the Samples folder under C:\ProgramData\Manure Management Planner. Here are some of the example files:

Command Buttons

The row of buttons at the bottom of the main window are command buttons. Use these buttons to operate MMP. For example, to create a new manure management plan, click the New button.

Some command buttons may be disabled at certain times. For example, you can't choose some of the buttons until you've first created or opened a plan file.

New

Click this button to create a new plan. MMP displays the New Manure Management Plan dialog box, where you select the new plan's state and the number of years in the plan.

After it creates the new plan, MMP updates the title bar and displays the new plan's General data panel, which is blank since no plan data has been entered yet.

You can only have one plan open at a time. If a plan is already open, MMP first closes it before creating the new plan. If you've made changes to the plan and haven't saved them, MMP prompts whether to save them before creating the new plan.

Open

Click this button to open an existing plan file. MMP displays the Open Manure Management Plan File dialog box, where you select the file to open.

After it opens the file, MMP updates the title bar and displays the plan's General data panel.

You can only have one plan open at a time. If a plan is already open, MMP first closes it before opening the selected plan file. If you've made changes to the plan and haven't saved them, MMP prompts whether to save them before opening the selected plan file.

Reopen

Click this button to select from a list of recently used plan files. MMP displays the Reopen Manure Management Plan File dialog box, where you select the file to open.

Close

Click this button to close the current plan. If you've made changes to the plan and haven't saved them, MMP prompts whether to save them before closing the plan.

Although you don't need to close a plan before creating or opening another one (MMP will do this automatically), you can do so if you want.

Save

Click this button to save any changes you've made to the current plan. If the current plan is new, you'll be prompted for a name to use for the new plan's file.

Save As

Click this button to save the current plan to a different plan file. This command is useful if you want to make a copy of a plan under a different file name.

Tools

Click this button to run a tool. MMP displays the Tools dialog box's Reports panel, where you can choose a report to run or switch to one of the other tool panels.

Help

Click this button to display the help contents.

About

Click this button to display the About box, where MMP's version and copyright is displayed along with links to important help topics and resources.

Exit

Click this button to exit MMP. If you've made changes to the current plan and haven't saved them, MMP prompts whether to save them before closing the plan and exiting.

General Panel

Use the General data panel to enter the operation's mailing address and county and specify the plan's starting year and month.

The input boxes on the General panel are:

Operation

Enter the name of the farming operation.

Address

Enter the operation's street address.

Town

Enter the operation's town.

State

Enter the operation's 2-letter state abbreviation.

Zip Code

Enter the operation's 5- or 9-digit zip code.

Contact

Enter the name of the operation's contact person.

Office Phone

Enter the contact person's business phone number, including area code.

There's space to use this suggested form: (###) ###-####

Home Phone

Enter the contact person's home phone number, including area code.

There's space to use this suggested form: (###) ###-####

E-mail Address

Enter the contact person's e-mail address.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the operation. You can enter up to 100 characters.

County

Select the county where the operation is located.

You must select the county for the operation or for the fields before you can select soils on the Fields panel. Also, if you change the operation's county after soils have been selected on the Fields panel, the selected soils for all fields that do not have a county will be deleted and you will have to re-select soils for the new operation county.

Starting Year

Enter the plan's starting year.

Starting Month

Select the plan's starting month.

Years In Plan

Enter the length of the plan, in years.

Setbacks

Click the Setbacks button to select the operation's manure application setback requirements.

Tips

  1. The plan's starting year, starting month, and length determine the period of time that the plan is designed for. If you have already started entering crops on the Crops panel or planned manure or fertilizer applications on the Nutrient Mgmt panel, changing the plan period will result in the loss of any data outside of the new period. MMP always prompts you if any data could be lost.

  2. Changing the plan period can also affect crops and manure applications that were not lost as a result of the change. For example, planned manure and fertilizer applications that you previously made may no longer make much sense for the new plan period. In general, you should not change the plan's period once you've started entering crops and manure applications unless you're willing to re-evaluate the remaining crops and manure applications in light of the new plan period.

Fields Panel

Use the Fields data panel to define the operation's crop fields.

The grid on the Fields panel contains the following columns:

Field ID

Enter a field ID for each field. You can enter up to 15 characters. The combined field ID and subfield ID must be unique.

Subfield ID

Enter an optional subfield ID for each field. You can enter up to 5 characters. The combined field ID and subfield ID must be unique. The subfield ID can be blank as long as the field ID by itself is unique.

Total Size (Acres)

Enter the field's total area.

Spreadable Size (Acres)

Enter the field's area available for manure application. You can leave this column blank if the spreadable size is the same as the field's total size.

Storage Distance (Miles)

Enter the driving distance between the field and manure storage. Be consistent in how you measure this distance (for example, you could enter the distance to the near edge of each field). If the operation has more than one storage facility, enter the distance from the facility most likely to be used in manuring the field. Storage distance is used along with other factors to determine the field's application priority. For crop-only operations, you can leave this column blank.

County (If Different From Operation's County)

If the field is located in a different county than the operation, select the field's county.

Predominant Soil Type

Select the field's predominant soil type. The pick list contains all soils for the county you selected for the field in the previous column or for operation on the General panel.

Each soil description in the list is made up of five pieces of information, as in this example:

  Beaucoup SIL (015 Bb 0-2%)

Beaucoup is the soil's component name, SIL is the soil's surface texture, 015 is the soil survey area ID, Bb is the soil's map unit symbol, and 0-2% is the soil's slope range.

Tip: Click the Soil Info button to generate a report with information on all soils available to the plan.

Slope % (If Not Ave.)

Enter the field's slope if it's different from the average of the selected soil's slope range. If you leave this column blank, MMP uses the average of the selected soil's slope range in any calculations. With the example soil given above, where the slope range is 0-2%, MMP will use 1% as the field's slope if you leave the Slope column blank.

Irrigated With Water

Check this box if the field is irrigated with water. If the field is irrigated, be sure to check this box since irrigation affects fertilizer recommendations in some states.

Tip: You can enter planned irrigation water applications in MMP's Fertilizer Application Editor. You can also account for irrigation water nitrate credits there.

Is Not Owned

Check this box if the field is rented or farmed under a land-use agreement and is not owned by the operation.

12-Digit Watershed Code

Enter the 12-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC) for the field's watershed. More information about watershed codes is here:

Farm ID

If the operation includes more than one farm, enter a farm ID for the field. The farm ID can be up to 15 characters.

FSA Farm Number

Enter the FSA farm number for the field. An FSA farm number can be up to 5 digits long, with no letters or decimals.

FSA Tract Number

Enter the FSA tract number for the field. An FSA tract number can be up to 10 digits long, with no letters or decimals.

FSA Field Number

Enter the FSA field number for the field. An FSA field number can be up to 4 digits long, with no letters or decimals.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the field. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Assessment Panel

Use the Assessment data panel to enter the crop fields' risk assessment data.

The grid on the Assessment panel contains the following columns.

Important! Many of the Assessment panel columns may not apply to your state. In general, MMP does not use very much of this data itself, but passes the data on to external programs such as RUSLE2, state phosphorus risk assessment custom tools, and other programs. The Assessment panel is a place where additional data required by these tools can be entered. If you know what the other values are, you can fill in the columns for completeness; otherwise, you can leave them blank. Check the documentation for your state's assessment tools (if available) to determine what values are required.

Distance To Water (Feet)

Enter the distance from the field to the nearest water, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool. Normally this is the shortest distance from the field's potential manure application area to the nearest water, but check your state's P risk assessment documentation to be sure.

Type Of Water

If you entered distance to water, select the type of water.

Slope Length (Feet)

Enter the distance from origin of overland flow to where it enters a \ concentrated flow area.

Runoff Reduct. Practice

Check this box if the field has a runoff reduction practice. Two examples of these practices are buffer strip and contour tillage.

Buffer Width (Feet)

If present, enter the width of a vegetated buffer or filter strip, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool. Leave this column blank for a field if no buffer applies to the field. Normally a buffer is situated along the edge of the field, but check with your state's P risk assessment documentation to be sure.

Example: Here's the definition of a vegetated buffer from EPA's guidance manual, Managing Manure Nutrients at Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, August 2004: "A vegetated buffer is a permanent strip of dense perennial vegetation established parallel to the contours of and perpendicular to the dominant slope of the land application field."

Type Of Artificial Drainage

If the field is artificially drained, select the type of drainage. If more than one drainage type applies to the field, select the type that presents the greatest risk of runoff.

Manure Applied Annually

Check this box if the field has been manured annually (every year) for the last several years. Leave the box unchecked if the field has not been manured every year.

Will Not Receive Manure

Check this box if the field will not be manured. When this box is checked, the field still appears in the Field Status grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel so you can apply fertilizer to it, but you won't be able to apply manure to it. Note that you can't check this box if you've already applied manure to the field on the Nutrient Mgmt panel.

Water Erosion (T/A/Yr)

Enter the field's estimated soil erosion from water, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool.

Note: Typically this is sheet and rill erosion as calculated by RUSLE2.

Important! Leave this column blank if you are using MMP's built-in RUSLE2. You only fill in this column if you are not using MMP's built-in RUSLE2 to calculate soil loss automatically. To enter input data for MMP's built-in RUSLE2, or to see a field's RUSLE2 soil loss, click the RUSLE2 button at the top of the Crops panel. When MMP's built-in RUSLE2 is used, anything you enter in the Water Erosion column will be ignored.

Wind Erosion (T/A/Yr)

Enter the field's estimated soil erosion from wind, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool.

Note: Typically this is wind erosion as calculated by the USDA-NRCS Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ).

Irrigation Erosion (T/A/Yr)

Enter the field's estimated soil erosion from irrigation, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool.

Gully Erosion (T/A/Yr)

Enter the field's estimated gully soil erosion, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool. This is sometimes referred to as "classic gully" erosion.

Note: The equation for calculating gully erosion for a single gully is:

  (Width Top + Width Bottom) / 2 x Depth x Length x Soil Weight / 2000 / Years Present

Dimensions are in feet and Soil Weight is in pounds per cubic foot of dry soil. Some typical values would be 84 for a silt loam soil, 90 for a loam, and 97 for a sandy loam.

This equation gives tons/year. To put the calculated gully erosion on a per-acre basis (tons/acre/year), divide by the field's size. Enter this value in the Gully Erosion column.

Tip: Document how you came up with a field's Gully Erosion in the Notes column.

Ephemeral Erosion (T/A/Yr)

Enter the field's estimated ephemeral soil erosion, as defined by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool. This is sometimes referred to as "ephemeral gully" erosion.

- Misc. data columns -

If required by your state's P Index or other risk assessment tool, one or more misc. data columns will appear between the Ephemeral Erosion and P Index columns. These misc. data columns will be labeled with a header that describes the state-specific data. When editing the column, a hint for the column will appear on the status bar that describes the column in greater detail. For more information, refer to your state's P Index or risk assessment tool documentation.

P Index Or Risk Index

If available, enter the field's phosphorus index or other risk assessment index or score. If you enter something other than a P index value in this column, it's a good idea to document what the column is being used for in the first field's notes.

Important! Leave this column blank if you are using MMP's built-in P.I. or other built-in tool for your state to assess risk. You only fill in this column if you are not using MMP's built-in tool.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the field's assessment data. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Soil Tests Panel

Use the Soil Tests data panel to enter the crop fields' soil test data.

Refer to the Tips section below for information on P, K, Mg, Ca, Na and Al units.

The grid on the Soil Tests panel contains the following columns:

Field ID

This column shows the field's ID that was entered on the Fields panel.

Subfield ID

This column shows the field's subfield ID that was entered on the Fields panel.

Test Year

Enter the year that the field's soil test sample was taken.

OM (%)

Enter the field's organic matter content.

P

Enter the field's phosphorus level.

P Test Used

Select the test that was used to determine the field's soil phosphorus level.

K

Enter the field's potassium level.

Mg

Enter the field's magnesium level.

Ca

Enter the field's calcium level.

Na

Enter the field's sodium level.

Al

Enter the field's aluminum level.

Levels Are In Lb/A

Check this box if the P, K, Mg, Ca, Na and Al levels are in Lb/A; leave this box unchecked if the test levels are in ppm.

Soil pH

Enter the field's soil or water pH.

Buffer pH

Enter the field's buffer pH.

Target pH

Enter the field's target pH if your state uses it in crop fertilizer recommendations.

Estimated CEC

This column shows the field's estimated cation exchange capacity (in milli-equivalents per 100 grams).

Note that when you click on this column, MMP displays the equation it used to estimate CEC on the status bar.

CEC

Enter the field's cation exchange capacity if different from the estimate. If you leave this column blank, MMP uses the estimated CEC in any calculations.

Lime (%)

Enter the field's free lime content.

NO3-N (ppm)

Enter the field's nitrate nitrogen level, in parts per million of nitrogen in the nitrate form.

Soil test nitrate levels are used in determining crop nitrogen fertilizer recommendations, particularly in western states. Be sure to enter an average value for the depth assumed by your state's nitrogen fert recs. See the state-specific notes for more information.

If you have nitrate concentrations from more than one depth, click the Calc button or press F2 to display the Soil Test Nitrate Calculator. This calculator can be used to calculate the depth-weighted average nitrate concentration assumed by your state's nitrogen fert recs.

EC (mmhos/cm)

Enter the field's electrical conductivity, in mmhos/cm or dS/m.

SO4-S (ppm)

Enter the field's sulfate sulfur level, in parts per million of sulfur in the sulfate form.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the field's soil test data. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Tips

  1. A field's P, K, Mg, Ca, Na and Al test levels can be entered in Lb/A or ppm. Check the Levels Are In Lb/A box to indicate Lb/A or leave the box unchecked to indicate ppm. Note that all five values must be in the same units.

    If you need to convert a soil test value from ppm to Lb/A, multiply the value by 2. This gives Lb/A for the top 6 inches of soil.

    To convert a soil test value from Lb/A to ppm, divide the value by 2. This assumes the Lb/A value represents the top 6 inches of soil.

  2. The P and K values must be in terms of elemental P and K. If your test values are expressed in terms of P2O5 and K2O, you'll need to convert them. With a P2O5 test value, multiply the value by 0.44 to convert it to elemental P. With a K2O test value, multiply the value by 0.83 to convert it to elemental K.

  3. Although you should enter as much soil test data as possible, you really only need to enter what's required by your state's fertilizer recommendations. Most recommendations require at least P, K and CEC; some recommendations may require additional soil test data. If a crop's default fertilizer recommendation is blank on the Crops panel, make sure you've entered enough soil test data for that crop's field.

Crops Panel

Use the Crops data panel to enter the fields' crops and yield goals for each year in the plan.

Refer to the Notes section below for more information.

The grid on the Crops panel contains the following columns:

Field ID

This column shows the field's ID that was entered on the Fields panel.

Subfield ID

This column shows the field's subfield ID that was entered on the Fields panel.

Crop Year

This column shows the crop year in the plan.

Planned Crop

Select the field's crop for the indicated year. This can be the only crop planned or the second crop if double cropping.

Tip: To enter a double-crop, scroll to the right and select the field's cover crop or first crop in the Planned Cover Crop Or First Crop column.

Tip: Click the Crop Info button to generate a report with information on all crops.

Tip: Click the RUSLE2 button to display the RUSLE2 Data Editor.

Yield Goal (/Acre)

Enter the crop's yield goal.

Tip: Yields for hay and pasture crops should be entered as tons of dry harvested material. Yields for silage crops should be entered as tons of wet material. For example, corn silage is usually assumed to be 65% moisture, meaning a 20 ton yield of corn silage contains 7 tons of dry matter.

Tip: If you need to enter a silage, haylage or "green chop" crop but it's not in the list of crops, you can generally select the appropriate hay crop and adjust the yield goal for the difference in moisture. For example, to enter alfalfa haylage, which is typically 50% moisture, select alfalfa and divide the haylage yield goal by 2 to get its alfalfa hay dry matter equivalent. Be sure to document the actual silage crop and its wet weight yield goal in the Source column.

Yield Units

This column shows the crop's yield goal units.

Legume % Stand

With forage crops, enter the percent of the stand that is legume.

Default N Rec (Lb/A)

This column shows the crop's nitrogen recommendation.

Note: The default N rec includes any legume N credit from the previous year's crop (see note 4 below).

Default P2O5 Rec (Lb/A)

This column shows the crop's phosphorus recommendation.

Default K2O Rec (Lb/A)

This column shows the crop's potassium recommendation.

Custom N Rec (Lb/A)

Enter an N recommendation to use instead of the default recommendation. Leave this column blank unless you need to override the default.

Custom P2O5 Rec (Lb/A)

Enter a P2O5 recommendation to use instead of the default recommendation. Leave this column blank unless you need to override the default.

Custom K2O Rec (Lb/A)

Enter a K2O recommendation to use instead of the default recommendation. Leave this column blank unless you need to override the default.

Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation

Enter the source of any custom fertilizer recommendation. You can enter up to 50 characters.

Planned Cover Crop Or First Crop

Select the field's cover crop or first crop (if there is one). Additional columns to the right of this column can be used to enter a first crop's yield goal and other data. These columns are identical to the crop columns described above.

Notes

  1. When you click on a default fertilizer recommendation cell, MMP displays the source of the default recommendation on the status bar. If the source is underlined, this means the source document is available on the Web. If you click on the underlined source MMP will launch your Web browser, which will download the source document from the Web for viewing.

  2. If you have no custom fertilizer recommendations and no cover or first crop will be planted, you only need to select the planned crop and enter its yield goal.

  3. If you do override the default fertilizer recommendations by entering a custom recommendation, be sure to enter the source of your custom recommendation too.

  4. MMP attempts to determine the first year's previous crop by looking at the field's crop rotation. Once you've entered crops for enough years, MMP can determine the rotation; it will then update the first year's default N rec, taking any N credit if applicable.

    If a field's planned crop rotation isn't the same as its historical rotation, or if you don't think MMP is determining the first year's previous crop properly, you can add or subtract the N credit from the first year's default N rec and enter your N rec in the first year's Custom N Rec column. This will override the Default N Rec column. Be sure to describe the reason for the custom N rec in the Source column.

    For the N credit amount and whether the crop can take a credit, consult the indicated source of the default N recommendation (displayed on the status bar when you click on the Default N Rec column).

  5. MMP considers a cover crop to be a non-harvested crop, so don't enter a yield goal for a cover crop if it won't be harvested.

  6. MMP considers a first crop to be the first harvested crop in a double-cropped year, so be sure to enter a yield goal for a first crop. If the field has only one harvested crop in a crop year, enter it as the planned crop.

Storage Panel

Use the Storage data panel to define the operation's manure storage facilities.

The grid on the Storage panel contains the following columns:

Storage ID

Enter a unique ID for each manure storage facility. You can enter up to 20 characters.

Storage Type

Select the type of storage facility.

Tip: Click the Storage Info button to generate a report with information on all storage types.

Units

This column shows the storage type's units.

Pumpable Or Spreadable Capacity

Enter the storage's pumpable or spreadable capacity. If you don't know the storage's capacity, click the Calc button or press F2 to display the Storage Capacity Calculator.

If the storage isn't limited, enter a suitably large value here (and document it in the Notes column) so the storage won't ever be shown as overflowing on the Nutrient Mgmt panel.

Manure On Hand At Start Of Plan

Enter the amount of manure in the storage facility at the beginning of the plan's starting month.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the storage facility. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Animals Panel

Use the Animals data panel to define the operation's animal groups.

The grid on the Animals panel contains the following columns:

Animal Group ID

Enter a unique ID for each group of animals. You can enter up to 20 characters.

Animal Type And Production Phase

Select the type of animal housed in the facility.

Tip: Click the Animal Info button to generate a report with information on all animal types.

Average Weight (Lb)

Enter the average animal weight. You can estimate this using (starting weight + finished weight) / 2.

Number

Enter the average number of animals that are present in the facility at any one time.

Animals Present From

Select the start of the period when animals are present (to nearest half-month). If animals are present year-round, select Jan Early in this column and Dec Late in the next column.

Animals Present Through

Select the end of the period when animals are present (to nearest half-month).

Manure Collected (%)

Enter the percent of manure produced during the indicated period that is collected.

For example, if animals are only confined for six hours per day, you could enter 25 to indicate that only 1/4 of the manure they produce is collected.

With poultry operations, use this column to indicate that houses are only occupied part of the year. For example, with a broiler operation that produces 5 flocks per year, with a 42-day grow-out period, enter 58 (5 x 42 = 210 days, which is 58% of a 365-day year). Be sure to select Jan Early through Dec Late in the Animals Present columns to indicate year-round production.

Here is some typical poultry data that you may find useful in the absence of your own data:

Extra Water (Gal/Animal/Day)

With liquid manure systems, you can enter any extra wash or flush water added to the animal group's manure.

Bedding (Lb/Animal/Day)

With non-poultry solid manure systems, you can enter any bedding added to the animal group's manure. With poultry manure systems, you can account for litter in the Measured Manure Production column on the Analysis panel. Note that in some states, litter is already accounted for in the poultry manure production values.

Where Will Manure Be Stored?

Select the storage facility where the animals' manure is stored. The pick list contains the storage ID's that you entered on the Storage panel.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the animal group. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Rations Panel

Use the Rations data panel to select feed amendments that are used with the animal groups. Selecting a ration for an animal group affects the estimated manure analysis for the animal group's storage on the Analysis panel.

The grid on the Rations panel contains the following columns:

Animal Group ID

This column shows the animal ID that was entered on the Animals panel.

"Ration name"

MMP displays one check-box column for each ration defined for the plan's state. Check the box if the ration applies to the animal group. The status bar hint shows what effect selecting the ration will have on the estimated manure analysis.

Analysis Panel

Use the Analysis data panel to view estimated manure analysis and production data and enter measured manure analysis and production data for the storage facilities.

Refer to the Tips section below for more information.

The grid on the Analysis panel contains the following columns:

Storage ID

This column shows the storage ID that was entered on the Storage panel.

Estimated Total N

This column shows the storage's estimated manure analysis for total N.

Est. NH4-N

This column shows the storage's estimated manure analysis for ammonium N.

Est. Total P2O5

This column shows the storage's estimated manure analysis for total P2O5.

Est. Total K2O

This column shows the storage's estimated manure analysis for total K2O.

Est. Max. Avail. N

This column shows the storage's estimated maximum N available the first year after application, calculated from the manure's estimated ammonium N plus the mineralizable fraction of the manure's estimated organic N (where organic N = total N - ammonium N).

This estimate does not take into account any losses due to application method and timing.

Note that the amount of N available from applied manure as determined by state-specific availability factors will differ from this estimate.

Est. Avail. P2O5

This column shows the storage's estimated available P2O5.

Est. Avail. K2O

This column shows the storage's estimated available K2O.

Analysis Units

This column shows the storage's manure analysis units.

Estimated Manure Production

This column shows the estimated amount of manure added to the storage per year.

Production Units

This column shows the units for manure added to the storage.

Measured Total N

If available, enter a manure analysis total N to use instead of the estimate.

Meas. NH4-N

If available, enter a manure analysis ammonium N to use instead of the estimate.

Meas. Total P2O5

If available, enter a manure analysis total P2O5 to use instead of the estimate.

Meas. Total K2O

If available, enter a manure analysis total K2O to use instead of the estimate.

Meas. Max. Avail. N

This column shows the storage's estimated maximum N available the first year after application. This value is based on the measured total N and/or ammonium N values (if at least one was entered), or on the estimated N analysis (if a measured annual production amount was entered but no measured N analysis was entered). The value is calculated from the ammonium N plus the mineralizable fraction of the organic N (where organic N = total N - ammonium N).

This estimate does not take into account any losses due to application method and timing.

Note that the amount of N available from applied manure as determined by state-specific availability factors will differ from this estimate.

Meas. Avail. P2O5

This column shows the storage's estimated available P2O5. This value is based on the measured total P2O5 analysis (if entered), or on the estimated total P2O5 (if a measured production amount was entered but no P2O5 analysis was entered).

Meas. Avail. K2O

This column shows the storage's estimated available K2O. This value is based on the measured total K2O analysis (if entered), or on the estimated total K2O (if a measured production amount was entered but no K2O analysis was entered).

Analysis Units

This column shows the storage's manure analysis units.

Meas. % Dry Matter

If available, enter a manure analysis percent dry matter. Some labs may report this as percent solids. Other labs may report only percent moisture. If you know the manure's percent moisture, its percent dry matter is (100 - % moisture).

Measured Manure Production

If available, enter the amount of manure added annually to storage to use instead of the estimate.

Production Units

This column shows the units for manure added to the storage.

Source And Date Of Manure Analysis

Enter the source and date of any manure analysis. You can enter up to 50 characters.

Tips

  1. The estimates shown on this panel are based on the data you entered on the Storage, Animals and Rations panels.

  2. You can override MMP's estimates by entering your own measured analysis and production data in the columns to the right of the estimates. If you don't have any measured analysis data or prefer to use MMP's estimates, you don't have to enter anything on this panel.

  3. If you do override the estimated manure analysis by entering measured analysis data, be sure to override the estimated manure production as well.

  4. If you do override the estimated manure production by entering a measured production value, be sure to override the estimated manure analysis as well. If you don't, MMP will adjust its estimated analysis accordingly and fill in the Meas. Max. Avail. N, Meas. Avail. P2O5, and Meas. Avail. K2O columns even though no measured analysis was entered.

  5. If you do override the estimated analysis by entering measured analysis data, be sure to enter the source and date of your analysis too.

  6. Measured analysis data must be entered as pounds of nutrient per 1000 gallons (liquid manure) or pounds per ton (solid manure) on an "as is" basis. Do not enter the analysis on a dry-weight basis.

    The appropriate units are listed in the Analysis Units column depending on whether the manure is liquid or solid.

    If your lab analysis reports nutrient concentration in parts per million (ppm) or milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg), you'll need to convert the analysis to pounds using one of these equations:

      Liquid manure Lb/1000 Gal = ppm x 0.00834

      Solid manure Lb/Ton = ppm x 0.002

    If your lab analysis reports nutrient concentration as a percent by weight (%), convert the analysis to pounds using one of these equations:

      Liquid manure Lb/1000 Gal = % x 83.4

      Solid manure Lb/Ton = % x 20

    Note that this assumes that the density of liquid manure is similar to that of water (about 8.3 pounds per gallon).

  7. With P and K, the measured analysis must be entered as P2O5 and K2O. If your lab analysis reports the concentration of elemental P and K, you'll need to convert the analysis using these equations:

      P2O5 = 2.3 x P

      K2O = 1.2 x K


Equipment Panel

Use the Equipment data panel to define the equipment used to apply manure.

The grid on the Equipment panel contains the following columns:

Equipment ID

Enter a unique ID for each manure spreader or applicator. You can enter up to 20 characters.

Spreader Or Applicator Type

Select the type of spreader or applicator.

Spreader Or Pump Capacity

Enter the spreader or pump capacity.

Capacity Units

This column shows the spreader type's capacity units.

Minimum Application Rate

Enter the spreader's minimum application rate.

Rate Units

This column shows the spreader type's rate units.

Application Width Or Area

Enter the width of the spreader's application swath or area covered by irrigation application.

Width Or Area Units

This column shows the spreader type's width or area units.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the equipment. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Nutrient Mgmt Panel

Use the Nutrient Mgmt data panel to plan manure and fertilizer applications for your crop fields. This panel contains three grids.
  1. The Storage Status grid at the top shows the monthly inventory status of the storage facilities that you entered on the Storage panel. You also access the Manure Transfer Editor from this grid.

  2. The Field Status grid in the middle shows the monthly manure status of the crop fields that you entered on the Fields panel. It also shows if a field has any fertilizer applications. You also access the Fertilizer Application Editor from this grid.

  3. The Manure Applications grid at the bottom shows the planned manure applications for the currently selected storage-month or field-month in the upper grids. You edit a storage or field's manure applications, or enter new applications, by clicking on a cell in one of the upper grids, then clicking on the bottom grid to edit the manure application data. You also access the Manure Application Rate Calculator from this grid.

Storage Status grid

Note the layout of the panel's top grid. The first row of the grid gives the month and year for each month in the plan. The remaining rows give the monthly inventory status of each storage facility that you entered on the Storage panel.

The leftmost column of each storage row displays the row's storage ID. The columns to the right of each storage ID show the estimated quantity of manure in that storage for each month in the plan. These numbers reflect the data you entered on the Storage, Animals, Rations and Analysis panels, as well as any planned manure applications or manure transfers through the current month. Note that these inventory numbers will change if you make a change to their underlying data.

If a number in a storage cell is displayed underlined and in red, this indicates that the anticipated manure available by the end of that month will exceed the facility's capacity.

Green indicates the facility's capacity is sufficient for the amount of manure available.

A negative number displayed in purple indicates that you're planning to use more manure than you have. This could also occur if you reduce the number of animals or the measured annual manure production after you've already entered some planned manure applications.

A number displayed in bold indicates there was at least one manure application from the storage that month. A number displayed in italic indicates there was at least one manure transfer (export, import, or internal transfer) for the storage that month.

Tip: To view or enter the planned manure applications for a storage, click on a storage cell. This displays the applications from that storage-month in the bottom grid. To edit the manure application data, click on the bottom grid.

Tip: To view, enter or edit a storage's planned manure transfers, click on a storage cell and press F2 (or just double-click the cell) to display the Manure Transfer Editor.

Field Status grid

The rows of the middle grid give the monthly manure status of each field that you entered on the Fields panel. They also show if the fields have any fertilizer or irrigation water applications.

The leftmost column of each row shows the row's field ID. The columns to the right of each field ID show the number of acres in the field that have been manured through that month. If there were no applications in a particular month, no acres are displayed, meaning the number of acres manured has not changed since the last time manure was applied to that field.

If an "F" appears at the right side of a field cell, this means the field has at least one fertilizer or irrigation water application that month.

If a "P", "T" or "H" appears in a field cell, this indicates that the crop's RUSLE2 management includes a planting (P), tillage (T) or harvest (H) operation during that month. Note that if you haven't entered a RUSLE2 management yet for the crop, these letters won't appear.

If a field cell's background is red, this means that no more manure is needed that month, either because of an earlier manure application that year or a multi-year application in a previous year. In general, you should only apply manure in months with a white background. To find the next month when manure can be applied to that field, scroll the grid to the right and look for the next field cell with a white background. Note that MMP does not highlight months following custom rate applications because it doesn't know the intended nutrient target with custom rates.

Tip: To view or enter a field's planned manure applications, click on a field cell. This displays the field's manure applications for that month in the bottom grid. To edit the manure application data, click on the bottom grid.

Tip: To view, enter or edit a field's planned fertilizer or irrigation water applications, click on a field cell and press F2 (or just double-click the cell) to display the Fertilizer Application Editor.

Manure Applications grid

The bottom grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel shows the planned manure applications (if any) for the currently highlighted storage or field cell in the upper grids. When a storage cell is highlighted, the bottom grid shows that month's manure applications from the highlighted storage. When a field cell is highlighted, the bottom grid shows that month's manure applications for the highlighted field. Click on a cell in the top or middle grid to highlight it; the cell's month and its storage or field ID will be displayed in bold.

Important! When a storage cell in the top grid is highlighted, the first column in the bottom grid contains a drop-down pick list of fields that you select from. When a field cell in the middle grid is highlighted, the first column in the bottom grid contains a drop-down pick list of storages that you select from.

Note that the field pick list is ranked. With fields that are candidates for manure application that month, the crop that the application will be fertilizing appears in parentheses after the field ID. Fields that are not candidates for manure application that month fall to the bottom of the list; the reason why a field should not be manured that month appears in brackets following the field ID.

Tip: To change the way that fields are ranked in the pick list, right-click the indicator column () at the left side of the grid to display a popup menu and choose Rank Field List By. The current rank order will be checked. Choose a different rank order to change the field pick list ranking. (Note the Plan Field Order choice. This allows you to see the pick list fields in the same order that they appear on the Fields panel and in the Field Status grid. You can rank the fields on the Fields panel by any field or soil test data, then use that same ranked order in the field pick list by choosing Plan Field Order. You can also order the fields in the pick list by application priority.)

Tip: Click the Calc button or press the F2 key to display the Manure Application Rate Calculator.

Tip: To delete an entire manure application, right-click on the application's indicator column to display the popup menu and choose Delete Application. To delete all of a plan's manure applications, use the Delete All Manure Applications button on the Tools dialog box's Misc panel.

Tip: To duplicate a manure application for other fields, right-click on the application's indicator column to display the popup menu and choose Duplicate Application, then select the group of fields in the Duplicate Manure Application dialog.

The Manure Applications grid contains these columns:

Where Will Manure Be Applied?

If a storage cell in the top grid is highlighted, the first column contains a list of fields. Select the field where manure from the highlighted storage will be applied. By default, fields are ranked in the same order that they appear in the plan, but you can change this by choosing a different rank order from the popup menu (right-click the indicator column).

What Is Application's Manure Source?

If a field cell in the middle grid is highlighted, the first column contains a list of storages. Select the source of the manure that will be applied to the highlighted field.

Application Equipment

Select the equipment that will be used to apply the manure. The pick list contains the equipment you entered on the Equipment panel.

Days To Incorp.

With surface-applied manure that will be incorporated, enter the number of days before the manure will be incorporated. If surface-applied manure won't be incorporated, or if the manure will be injected or irrigated, leave this column blank.

Examples: With single-pass incorporation, enter 0. If manure will be incorporated within 12 hours (same day), enter 0.5. If manure will be incorporated within 24 hours (next day), enter 1. If manure will be incorporated within 48 hours (day after next), enter 2.

Rate (/Acre)

Enter the per-acre manure application rate or click the Calc button (or press F2) to display the Manure Application Rate Calculator. With liquid manure, the rate's units are Gal/Acre; with solid manure, the rate's units are Ton/Acre.

Loads

With manure spreaders, enter the number of loads of manure applied to the field. This value is the amount of manure applied divided by the spreader's capacity. If you change this value, MMP updates the Amount Applied column to reflect the new number of loads applied.

Amount Applied

Enter the total amount of manure applied to the field with the application. With manure spreaders, this value is the number of loads times the spreader's capacity. If you change this value, MMP updates the Loads column to reflect the new amount of manure applied. With liquid manure, the amount's units are Gal; with solid manure, the amount's units are Ton.

Area Covered (Acres)

This column shows the number of acres covered by the manure application.

Apply At Or For

This column shows the distance traveled in field (in feet) to apply one load (spreaders), miles per hour (hose pull), feet per hour (traveling gun), or pumping minutes per application area (standing pipe, center pivot).

Units

This column shows the units for the Apply At Or For column. Possible units are feet traveled per load, miles per hour, feet per hour, or pumping minutes per application area.

Avail. N As Applied (Lb/A)

This column shows the estimated N available to the field's crop from the manure application. Clicking on this cell displays on the status bar the source of the data used to estimate manure available N. If the source is underlined, this means the source document is available on the Web. If you click on the underlined source MMP will launch your Web browser, which will download the source document from the Web for viewing.

Note: The three As Applied columns show nutrients applied on a single-acre basis (application rate x manure available nutrients). If the field is not completely or uniformly manured, MMP calculates a weighted field average in its reports that may differ from the corresponding As Applied value. This can also occur with a small field where the Amount Applied (loads x spreader capacity) exceeds what the field needs because MMP always calculates the number of whole loads. To check if this has occurred, compare the Area Covered to the field's spreadable area. If the Area Covered is significantly greater, only a fraction of the last load is needed. To eliminate this difference, you can reduce the Amount Applied value until the Area Covered is equal to or only slightly greater than the field's spreadable area (displayed in the Field Status grid).

N Need Or Excess (Lb/A)

This column shows the excess (or deficit) N available to the field's crop from the manure application, relative to the crop's fertilizer recommendation. This value is adjusted for the residual N expected to become available from any previous years' planned manure applications. If negative, this is the amount of supplemental fertilizer needed.

Avail. P2O5 As Applied (Lb/A)

This column shows the estimated P2O5 available to the field's crop from the manure application.

P2O5 Need Or Excess (Lb/A)

This column shows the excess (or deficit) P2O5 available to the crop from the manure application, relative to the crop's fertilizer recommendation. If negative, this is the amount of supplemental fertilizer needed.

Avail. K2O As Applied (Lb/A)

This column shows the estimated K2O available to the field's crop from the manure application.

K2O Need Or Excess (Lb/A)

This column shows the excess (or deficit) K2O available to the crop from the manure application, relative to the crop's fertilizer recommendation. If negative, this is the amount of supplemental fertilizer needed.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the manure application. You can enter up to 100 characters.

New Manure Management Plan Dialog Box

Select the state for the new plan and enter the number of years in the plan, then click OK to close the dialog box and create the plan. MMP displays the new plan's General data panel, where you can begin entering data.

Select Operation's State

This list box displays the states for which initialization files are installed. Click on the new plan's state.

Enter Number of Years in Plan

The state's default number of years for plans is displayed here when the state is selected. You can enter a different number of years for the new plan if you want.

Tips

  1. You can always increase or decrease the number of years in the plan later.

  2. When a new plan is created, it's not yet associated with a file. To save a new plan to a file, click the Save button and enter a name to use for the new plan file.

  3. Before entering any data, it's a good idea to review the state-specific notes for the plan's state.

Tools: Reports

Use the Reports panel in the Tools dialog box to run a built-in report. Click the desired report's button to run that report with the current plan's data. (If you don't have a plan open, the buttons are disabled.)

Check Plan's Data For Completeness

Click this button to generate a report that lists any missing values or inconsistencies in the plan's data.

Report Annual Field Nutrient Needs

Click this button to generate a report that lists each field's nutrient needs for each year in the plan.

Report Field Nutrient Balance

Click this button to generate a report that summarizes the net effect of planned nutrient applications for each field. This report shows only the nutrient balances at the end of each year and not the individual nutrient applications.

Report Field Nutrient Status Details

Click this button to generate a detailed report that shows the effect of planned nutrient applications for each field. This report shows individual nutrient applications as well as the nutrient balances at the end of each year.

Report Projected Soil P And K Levels

Click this button to view a report that shows projected soil P and K levels at the end of the plan, based on crop removal rates and planned manure and fertilizer applications.

View Report With Word

If you have Microsoft Word installed, check this box to open the report in Word, where you can view, edit, print and save the report. If you leave the box unchecked, MMP opens the report in the Preview dialog box, where you can view, print or save the report, but not edit it.

Questions about built-in reports

  1. What happens when you run a built-in report?

    It depends on whether the View Report With Word box is checked. If the box is not checked, MMP generates the report you've run and opens the Preview dialog box, where you can view, print or save the report, but not edit it.

    If the View Report With Word box is checked, MMP generates the report you've run and opens it in Word (if you have Word installed), where you can view, edit, print and save the report. When done viewing the report, close Word to return to MMP.

  2. What does the asterisk (*) that sometimes appears after the Last Saved date mean?

    If you generate a report that displays an asterisk (*) after the Last Saved date at the top of the page, this means you made changes to the plan but hadn't saved the plan yet when you ran the report. If you subsequently save the plan, the Last Saved date may be different the next time you run a report. The asterisk merely warns you that the Last Saved date may be misleading. In general, you should save a plan before running a report that you intend to file or give to somebody. That way the report accurately reflects the information in the plan file at the time you ran the report.

  3. How do the reports average multiple applications to the same field?

    Occasionally you may notice that the Nutrients Applied values in the Field Nutrient Balance and Field Nutrient Status Details reports differ from the As Applied values in the Manure Applications grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel. Here's a detailed explanation of why:

    When there is more than one manure application to the same field in a given crop year, the reports sum up all manure nutrients applied to the field during the crop year and divide by the spreadable size of the field to get a per-acre weighted average. This weighted average can be misleading if parts of the field were manured at different nutrient rates, or if the field wasn't completely manured, or if manure applications overlap.

    For example, if one half of a field was manured at less than the rate needed to meet a nutrient target and the other half of the field was manured at greater than the rate needed, the reports will show a deficit or an excess for the entire field depending on how the weighted average compares to the recommended rate.

    Using a weighted average can have other subtle side-effects. For example, if you apply enough loads of manure to cover 20.5 acres, but the field is only 20 acres in size, MMP assumes that the extra manure had to go somewhere on the field, so this is represented in the per-acre weighted average. Contrast this to the Manure Applications grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel, which shows nutrients applied on a single-acre basis (application rate x manure available nutrients). In this example the value in the Manure Applications grid will be slightly smaller than the value in the reports.

    A report's nutrient balance is the field's nutrient need compared to the weighted average of all manure applications to the field that year, whereas the Manure Applications grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel simply shows the field's nutrient need compared to a single application's nutrient content. This single application may not cover the entire field or may not supply the same amount of nutrients as other applications to the same field.

    To ensure that the weighted field averages in the reports will be close to the single-acre values in the Manure Applications grid, try to cover the entire spreadable area of the field completely and uniformly in the same month with similar amounts of manure available nutrients.

  4. What if a field's projected P or K level is blank in the Projected Soil P And K Levels report?

    This means that MMP was unable to calculate the projected P or K level at the end of the plan for that field. This can happen for a number of reasons:

    Note that if different areas of a field are manured in the same year at different nutrient rates (application rate x manure nutrient content), or the field was not completely manured, or manure applications overlap, MMP calculates the field's overall average nutrient rate.


Tools: Custom

Use the Custom panel in the Tools dialog box to run a custom tool. Descriptions of the currently loaded custom tools appear in the box at the top of the panel. Information about the currently selected tool appears below the box.

The list of tools includes tools installed with MMP, as well as any tools specific to the current plan's state.

Click the plus sign (+) to the left of a group of tools to expand it. When expanded, the plus sign changes to a minus sign (-) and the individual tools are displayed below the group name. To collapse an expanded list of tools, click the group's minus sign (-). The number in brackets after the tool group name is the number of individual tools in that group.

Tip: Groups of tools whose tool cabinet icon is yellow are "official" tools distributed with MMP that are available for all states. Groups of tools with a green icon are state-specific tools or tools developed by others that have been installed on your system.

Source

This box shows the author or source of the currently selected custom tool. With the tools installed with MMP, the source is simply given as "Manure Management Planner."

Requires

This box shows the software required to run the currently selected custom tool. This software is not included with MMP.

Run Custom Tool

Click this button to run the currently selected custom tool.

Questions about custom tools

What happens when you run a custom tool?

After you run a custom tool, MMP starts up the tool's software, then turns control over to the tool. When you're done working with the tool, close the tool's software to return control to MMP. If you need help with viewing or printing a tool's report, refer to the tool software's help.

With some custom tools, MMP exports the current plan's data to an Access file for use by the tool. This file is not deleted when you're done using the tool. However, you can delete this file manually with Windows Explorer if you need to free up disk space on your computer. The Access file will have the same name as the plan file that was open when the tool was run, but with an .mdb extension. The Access file will be created in the plan file's folder.


Tools: Export

Use the Export panel in the Tools dialog box to export plan data to a different file format for use with other software. Click the desired format's button to export the current plan's data to that format. (If you don't have a plan open, the buttons are disabled.)

Create Zip File For Submitting Plan

Click this button to zip up the files that constitute the nutrient management plan. MMP will also export some of these files to XML so that their data is included in the .zip file in more than one format. You can submit this .zip file along with the nutrient management plan document(s).

Note: MMP will look in the plan file's folder for a file of GIS data with the same file name and a .gis.xml extension. If it finds this file, MMP will include it in the .zip file. Note that this XML file is created by your GIS application, not by MMP. If you don't have this file, you can submit your GIS files separately or add them manually to the .zip file.

Important: If you're not submitting a .zip file, or plan to do so later, you should still create the .zip file as soon as the nutrient management plan has been accepted as a way to document the base data and version of MMP that was used to calculate the plan results. Don't wait until after you've installed a newer version of MMP.

Export Plan's Data To Access Database

Click this button to export the plan's data to an Access database file.

Export Plan's Data To dBASE Files

Click this button to export the plan's data to dBASE files.

Tools: Import

Use the Import panel in the Tools dialog box to import data from an external file into the current plan.

Import dBASE Field Data File

Click this button to select a dBASE file to import. Once you've selected a dBASE file, MMP displays the Import Wizard dialog.

Note: The dBASE file you select must conform to the specifications of an MMP-standard dBASE field data import file. For more information, refer to document ImportDbfSpec.doc in the MMP TechDocs folder. For examples of standard dBASE field data import files, see the ImportExample_IN.dbf file in the Samples folder and the empty ImportTemplate.dbf file in the TechDocs folder.

Tip: To use the field identification data from an import file in your plan, import the file before entering any field data in your plan.

Important: Excel is no longer able to save to dBASE format. If you need to create an import file with Excel, save your data to a CSV file instead (see next item).

Import CSV Field Data File

Click this button to select a comma-separated-values (CSV) file to import. Once you've selected a CSV file, MMP displays the Import Wizard dialog.

Note: A CSV file is a text file that you can create with Excel and other programs. A CSV file consists of a header line containing column names, followed by one or more lines of data. Items in each line are separated by commas. Each line of data must contain the same number of items as there are columns in the header line. In all other regards, the data in a CSV file must conform to the same specifications as a dBASE import file (see above). See the ImportExample_IN.csv file in the Samples folder.

Import Toolkit Customer XML File

Click this button to import customer data from an XML file exported by USDA-NRCS Customer Service Toolkit. For more information, refer to FAQ #10.

Get Conservation Plan From Toolkit XML File

Click this button to extract one or more conservation plans from an XML file exported by USDA-NRCS Customer Service Toolkit. MMP saves the conservation plans to an XML file in the same folder as your MMP plan file.

Note: The Import panel provides two ways of utilizing data from a customer's Toolkit data. The first is simply to import the customer's name and address and basic field information (FSA tract, field, acreage) into a new MMP plan. Later, after you've updated the customer's conservation plan, you can extract and save it to a new XML file that will be used by MMP when creating a CNMP or other plan document.


Tools: Misc

The Misc panel in the Tools dialog box contains buttons for miscellaneous commands.

View And Set Plan Properties

Click this button to display the Plan Properties dialog box, where you can view and edit information about the current plan.

Delete All Manure Applications

Click this button to delete all planned manure applications from the current plan.

Tip: This command is useful if you need to start over with allocating or want to develop alternate manure allocation schemes for the same plan input data.

Delete All Manure Transfers

Click this button to delete all planned manure transfers from the current plan.

Delete All Fertilizer Applications

Click this button to delete all planned fertilizer and irrigation water applications from the current plan.

Tip: This command is useful if you need to start over with planning fertilizer applications.

Delete All RUSLE2 Data

Click this button to delete all RUSLE2 data that you've entered in the RUSLE2 Data Editor from the current plan.

Note: This command does not delete any data from your RUSLE2 database (.gdb).


Export To Access Database Dialog Box

Select the export options you want, then click the OK button to export the current plan's data. MMP will prompt for the name of the Access database file to create.

MMP creates several tables in the exported database for each option selected. The number of tables that will be created in the database is listed next to each option.

Export Plan Data

When checked, MMP exports the manure management plan data. This is the data that you entered in the plan file. MMP also exports data such as fertilizer recommendations that are calculated from data you entered.

Export State's Initialization Data

When checked, MMP exports the state's initialization lookup data. This data comes from the initialization file for the plan's state.

Export Soils Data

When checked, MMP exports the soils lookup data for the plan's counties or state, depending on which soils option is selected (normally you only need to export the county soils data). This data comes from the soil file for the plan's state.

Set Lookup Properties

Much of the plan data you enter references other data in lookup tables. When this box is checked, you will see the lookup table data instead of the actual data when you edit the exported database with Access. When this box is unchecked, you will see the data as it's actually stored in the database. In general, the lookup table data is more descriptive and meaningful than the actual data.

Tips

  1. An exported file is only a "snapshot" of the plan file's data. As soon as you make changes to a plan and save the changes to the plan's file, the exported Access database is no longer up-to-date and should be deleted or exported again.

  2. Normally there's not much point in unchecking any of the data check boxes, since all of the data is related. For example, since the initialization and soils data is needed to interpret the plan data, exporting only the plan data will result in a database containing raw data that probably won't mean much to you.

  3. Unchecking the Set Lookup Properties box does not affect the relationships between exported tables, only how the data is displayed when editing the exported database with Access.

Export To dBASE Database Dialog Box

Select the export options you want, then click the OK button to export the current plan's data. MMP will create a dBASE file for each type of data exported. The dBASE file's name is formed by combining the plan file's name and the data type's name. If a dBASE file with that name already exists in the plan file's folder, it will be overwritten.

MMP creates several dBASE files for each option selected. The number of files that will be created is listed next to each option.

Export Plan Data

When checked, MMP exports the manure management plan data. This is the data that you entered in the plan file. MMP also exports data such as fertilizer recommendations that are calculated from data you entered.

Export State's Initialization Data

When checked, MMP exports the state's initialization lookup data. This data comes from the initialization file for the plan's state.

Export State's Soils Data

When checked, MMP exports the state's soils lookup data. This data comes from the soil file for the plan's state.

Tips

  1. If you are exporting data from more than one plan for the same state, you only need to export the initialization and soils data for one plan since the same dBASE files will be created for each plan.

  2. An exported file is only a "snapshot" of the plan file's data. As soon as you make changes to a plan and save the changes to the plan's file, the exported dBASE files are no longer up-to-date and should be deleted or exported again.

Import Wizard Dialog Box

The Import Wizard dialog box displays information about the dBASE import file you selected, including the number of errors encountered in the dBASE file. Based on the information displayed, click the appropriate button.

Import Data

Click Import Data to proceed with importing the dBASE file's data into the current plan.

View Errors

Click View Errors to display a detailed report about the dBASE file's data, including any errors that Import Wizard encountered.

Cancel

Click Cancel if you decide not to import the dBASE file's data. No changes will be made to the current plan if you click Cancel.

Select Conservation Plans

The Select Conservation Plans dialog box lists the names of all conservation plans in the Toolkit customer XML file that you selected.

If you're importing into an MMP plan, select one or more conservation plans whose land unit (field) data you want to import. If you don't select a conservation plan, MMP will only import customer name and address data and no land unit data.

If you're getting a conservation plan (for example, to use with your MMP plan's CNMP or other plan document), select one or more conservation plans whose conservation practices you want to include in the plan document. MMP will create a file with the same name as your MMP plan file, but with a .consplan.xml extension. MMP will output the selected conservation plans to this file, which will be created in the same folder as your MMP plan file. Note that if you don't select a conservation plan, the output file will not include any conservation practices.

Tip: Hold down the Shift key while selecting conservation plans with the mouse or keyboard to select a range of plans. You can also just drag the mouse up or down to select a range of plans. To select plans one at a time with the mouse, hold down the Ctrl key and click each plan you want to select.


Plan Properties Dialog Box

The Plan Properties dialog box displays information about the current plan, including the plan's file name, the folder where the plan file is located, the state and number of years that were selected when the plan was created, the version of MMP that saved the plan file and the date it was saved, and the name and revision date of the plan's initialization file. Note that some of this information will be blank with a new plan that has not yet been saved to a file.

You can use this dialog box to enter information such as title, author, company and comments for the current plan. The information you enter will be saved with the plan file.


About Box

The About box displays MMP's version and copyright information, as well as links to important help topics and resources. For more information, click on one of the links listed in the About box.

To close the About box, click the OK button or press the Esc key. To display the About box again, click the About button at the bottom of MMP's main window.

Help

These are help topics that contain answers and solutions to many common questions and problems, particularly for new users.

Resources

For additional information beyond MMP's built-in help, click on one of these links.

Examples

For information about MMP's sample plans or to view a sample or blank data collection form, click the appropriate link.

Preview Dialog Box

When you run a built-in report, the report is displayed in a window in the Preview dialog box. You can view and scroll through the report in this window, print or save the report, as well as search the report for text that you enter.

When you're done previewing the report, click the Close button or press the Esc key to close the Preview dialog box.

Find What

Enter the text to search for.

Match Case

Check this box if you want a case-sensitive search -- that is, if you want MMP to require that the case of the matching letters also match. If this box is unchecked, it doesn't matter if your search text is upper- or lower-case.

Find

Click the Find button to start the search. You can also press the Enter key from any of the controls in the Find Text box to start the search.

Print

Click the Print button to print the report.

Save

Click the Save button to save the report to a Rich Text Format file.

Close

Click the Close button to close the Preview dialog box. You can also press the Esc key.

Document Maker

MMP's Document Maker combines boilerplate text from a Microsoft Word template with tables of data that it generates into a "compound" document. After Document Maker has generated the document, it opens the document with Word so you can edit it and insert additional text, maps, or other items needed to complete the document.

Editing a document generated by Document Maker is about the same as editing any document with Word. However, there are a few things that may be new to you.

  1. AutoText. AutoText is a Word feature that lets you insert pre-written pieces of text into your document. If AutoText is available for your generated document, Document Maker turns on the AutoText toolbar. As you move through the document, the AutoText toolbar's menu button will change from All Entries to the name of the group of AutoText entries for that point in the document. For example, if your document contains a table that you need to fill in using AutoText, the toolbar's menu button changes as you move across the cells of the table's rows.

    To choose an AutoText entry, click the AutoText toolbar menu button to pull down the menu. When you select an AutoText entry from the menu, Word inserts that entry's text into the document.

  2. View | Print Layout. Your document may come up automatically in Print Layout mode. If it doesn't, you can switch to it by choosing Print Layout from Word's View menu. You'll need to be in Print Layout mode to see logos and other graphics in your document.

  3. Field Codes. Your document may contain hidden "tags" that told Document Maker what data to insert in the document. These tags are special Word field codes. Normally these field codes are hidden and you don't have to worry about them. However, to avoid accidentally deleting field codes while editing your document near data or tables that Document Maker inserted, you can temporarily turn on field codes by pressing Alt+F9. Don't delete or edit anything within the field code brackets or Document Maker won't be able to update your document later if your data changes.

    Important! Be sure to turn field codes off again. AutoText won't work unless field codes are off. Press Alt+F9 again to turn field codes off.

    Note: If you're editing in Print Layout mode, toggling field codes on or off may cause the document to move up or down in Word. You may have to scroll up or down to find where you were in the document when you toggled the field codes.

  4. Editing inserted data or tables. Anything that Document Maker inserted into your document will be surrounded by a pair of field codes, as discussed above. If you make any edits between a pair of field codes, these edits will be lost if you use Document Maker again later to update the document.

    In some cases, you will need to fill in tables that Document Maker inserted because it did not have all the data that was required for the table. In these cases, you will either need to (a) wait until you're all done with the document before filling in the tables, or (b) fill in the tables again after updating the document with Document Maker. (Note: Don't confuse tables of data that Document Maker inserted in the document with tables that you fill in yourself using AutoText.)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Document Maker

  1. Briefly, what is it that Document Maker does?

    Document Maker creates a document based on a Word document template. This template is either included with MMP or distributed separately and is often specific to an individual state. After creating the document, Document Maker looks for special tags hidden in the document that tell it where to insert data and tables. After inserting the data and tables, Document Maker opens Word so you can view and edit the document.

    Depending on the type of document created, Document Maker may also name and save the document. Later you can run Document Maker again to update the document if its underlying data has changed. Note that if the data did not change, there's no need to run Document Maker again for a document. If you need to start over completely, you can simply delete the generated document and create it again with Document Maker.

  2. Where did the document properties come from in my document?

    When you choose File | Info with a newly generated document, you may see that some information is already filled in under Properties. For example, the Title, Author, and Company properties may be filled in with the corresponding properties from your MMP plan (in MMP, click Tools, Misc, View And Set Plan Properties to view or edit a plan's properties).

    The Comments property is always filled in with the date and time the document was generated and the version of MMP that generated it.

  3. Why doesn't Word show the correct total number of pages in my document's header/footer?

    The total number of pages will be always be printed correctly. To force Word to update the page count that it displays while editing, try closing and reopening the document.

  4. How do I insert maps or other documents into my document?

    If you're using a GIS to generate field maps, you can use the GIS to export your map to a JPEG file (.jpg extension) or other image file format. For more information, refer to your GIS's documentation.

    Once you've exported a map to a JPEG file, you can insert the map into your document using Word's Insert | Pictures | From File command.

    To insert other documents into your document, use Word's Insert | Hyperlink command.

    You can also copy things from other programs to the Windows clipboard (Edit | Copy or Ctrl+C) and then paste them into your document (Edit | Paste or Ctrl+V).

  5. How can I get Word to repeat the table header row at the top of each page?

    When a table is too long to fit on one page, you can have Word repeat the table's header row on each additional page. Just click anywhere in the table's header row and click Repeat Header Rows.

  6. How can I keep a table from breaking across two pages?

    Assuming the table will fit on one page, you can select all rows in the table except the last row, then bring up the Paragraph format dialog and check the Keep with next box on the Line and Page Breaks panel.

  7. Can I add my own AutoText entries?

    In general, you should not try to add your own AutoText entries. Even if you figure out how to add an AutoText entry correctly to your document's template, the template will be overwritten the next time you install it (for example, if you install a newer version of MMP). If you're not careful, Word will add your new AutoText entry to its Normal.dotm template -- something you probably don't want.

  8. Can I move my generated document to a different computer?

    Yes, you can move your generated document to a different computer just like any Word document. However, if you still need to insert text into the document using AutoText, make sure you copy the document's template along with the document. Copy the template file into the same folder as the document.

    To determine the name of your document's template, use Word's File | Info command and look for the template name under Properties. You can find the template file in MMP's Custom folder.

    Note that you don't need to copy the template file if the other computer also has MMP installed. If MMP is not installed in the same folder as the computer where the document was created, you can attach the template file to the document using Word's Templates and Add-Ins command: click Attach and navigate to where the template file is located, select it and click Open. You can also use this technique to reattach a template after installing a newer version of MMP to a different folder.

  9. How can I prevent Document Maker's update from overwriting my manual edits to a table?

    Turn on field codes (Alt+F9) to reveal the hidden tags that surround each inserted table. Select and delete both the BeginAction tag before the table and the EndAction tag after the table. The next time you update the document with Document Maker, any changes you made to that table will be preserved.

Document Maker Run-Time Errors

Normally Document Maker completes its document generation without problems. However, if Document Maker encounters a problem that it can't resolve, it stops and displays a message explaining what's wrong. The following are the messages you might see and a brief explanation of how to fix the problem.

Manure Application Setback Requirements

If the operation is required to set back from certain geographic features while applying manure, check which set of requirements apply, then click OK to close the dialog box.

Note: You can select more than one set of requirements. For example, if a CAFO is also required to adhere to USDA-NRCS 590 or 633 setback guidelines, then check both the CAFO and NRCS boxes.

Caution! The list of setbacks that MMP displays is extracted from the national setbacks database, which is no longer being updated. The setbacks displayed may be out of date or incomplete. If so, you can just leave the setback choices unchecked.


Soil Test Nitrate Calculator

You can access the Soil Test Nitrate Calculator by clicking the Calc button or pressing F2 from the NO3-N column on the Soil Tests panel.

Use this dialog box to calculate a field's depth-weighted average nitrate concentration.

Follow these steps to calculate average nitrate concentration:

  1. Enter up to 4 pairs of sample depths and nitrate concentrations in the Bottom Depth and Nitrate N columns.

  2. If your total sample depth is less than what is assumed by your state's nitrogen fertilizer recommendations (see state-specific notes) and your state has factors for estimating the assumed depth's concentration from shallower samples, enter the appropriate factor in the Adjustment Factor input box.

  3. Click the Calculate button to display the calculated depth-weighted average nitrate concentration.

  4. Click the Accept button to insert the calculated average into the current field's NO3-N column on the Soil Tests panel.

  5. Click the Field up/down arrows to move to a different field and enter its nitrate data.

  6. When all done, click the Close button to close the calculator.

Notes

  1. When you click the Field up/down arrows to move to a different field that doesn't have any nitrate data, the calculator blanks the sample concentrations but keeps the sample depth values from the previous field. Since sample depths will likely be the same for all fields, this means you won't have to re-enter the depths for other fields, just the fields' nitrate concentrations.

  2. When you click the Accept button, the calculator not only inserts the calculated average into the current field's NO3-N column, but also saves the sample data. The next time you use the calculator for that field, it will display the sample data that the inserted average was based on.

  3. In general, about 2 pounds of nitrogen can be credited for each ppm of nitrate per 6-inch depth increment. Using a depth-weighted average allows MMP to calculate the soil nitrate's nitrogen credit from a single value.

  4. Nitrate concentrations are typically lower in subsurface soil samples than in surface samples. If a field's soil was not sampled to the depth assumed by your state's N fert recs and your state doesn't have a factor for estimating the assumed depth's concentration from a shallower sample, you may want to enter an adjustment factor of less than 1 to avoid overestimating the nitrate credit. For example, if you only have a 0-12" sample, but your state's N recs assume a 0-24" sample, you could enter 0.5 as an adjustment factor. With this factor you will be taking credit only for the depth that was sampled and for which you have actual soil nitrate data, meaning you will not be taking any credit for the 12-24" depth, whose concentration is unknown. You can document this adjustment factor in the Notes column on the Soil Tests panel.

  5. If you have sample depths that are greater than what's assumed by your state's N fert recs, just enter the sample(s) up to the assumed depth.

RUSLE2 Data Editor

The RUSLE2 Data Editor is where you enter most of the data required by RUSLE2 to estimate a field's soil loss. You access the RUSLE2 Data Editor by clicking the RUSLE2 button on the Crops panel.

Note that several data items required by RUSLE2 are also used by MMP and are entered on other panels. These include each field's soil type and slope (entered on the Fields panel), subsurface drainage (entered on the Assessment panel), and planned manure applications and planned irrigation water applications (entered on the Nutrient Mgmt panel).

Important! Before you can use MMP's RUSLE2 Data Editor, you must create or obtain a RUSLE2 database (.gdb extension) for use with your plan. This database must contain the correct climate, soil and crop management data for the farm's area or you won't be able to select the appropriate RUSLE2 data below.

Here are three ways you can create a RUSLE2 database for use with your plan:

Option 1. Use the following Web-based "clipper" application to locate your plan's farm and download data for the area of the farm.

This "clipping" automatically creates a RUSLE2 database for the farm's area that can be used with MMP, as follows:
  1. Using WinZip or a similar unzip utility, extract the .gdb file that's included in the downloaded .zip file.

  2. Rename the .gdb file so it has the same name as your plan file, but with a .gdb extension.

  3. Move the .gdb file to the same folder as your MMP plan file.
Example: You've downloaded file MyFarm.zip created by the clipper app to use with your JonesFarm.mmp plan. Extract file MyFarm_RUSLE2mosesdb.gdb from MyFarm.zip and rename it to JonesFarm.gdb. Also move JonesFarm.gdb into the same folder as JonesFarm.mmp. (Note that if you're using the downloaded .zip file's other data with a GIS, some GIS tools may extract and rename the RUSLE2 .gdb file for you automatically.)

Option 1 is the recommended way of creating a RUSLE2 database for use with MMP.

Option 2. If your organization already has a RUSLE2 database (perhaps on a network drive) that contains the data for the counties or states it serves, you can use this database with MMP.

Option 3. Install the standalone version of RUSLE2 on your computer and import the climate, soil, and crop management data for your area into RUSLE2. You can download RUSLE2's installer and your area's data files from here:

Tip: Once the standalone version of RUSLE2 has been installed, you can place the downloaded RUSLE2 climate, soil and management data files (.gdb extension) into its Import folder so they're handy for importing. To import one of the files, start RUSLE2 and choose Database | Import RUSLE2 database, then select one of the files to import. In the Import Database dialog box, check the box for the type of data you're importing (climates, soils or managements), then click the Import button.

Note that options 1 and 2 above do not require you to install the standalone version of RUSLE2.


In MMP's RUSLE2 Data Editor, you enter RUSLE2 data for the plan, for each field, and for each crop, as follows:

RUSLE2 Data For Plan

Database

If you have a RUSLE2 database (.gdb extension) with the same name and in the same folder as your plan file, you won't have to select a RUSLE2 database for the plan. In this case, when you open the plan file, MMP will select the plan's RUSLE2 database automatically. With a new plan that has not been named yet, be sure to save the plan, then re-open the plan file so MMP will know what database to look for. Also, if you move or rename your plan file, be sure to move or rename its RUSLE2 database too.

If you don't have a RUSLE2 database with the same name and in the same folder as your plan file, when you open the plan file MMP will select the standalone RUSLE2's startup database, which initially is named moses.gdb and is located in the standalone RUSLE2's install folder. If you don't have the standalone RUSLE2 installed, or if you want to use something other than RUSLE2's startup database, you will need to select the RUSLE2 database to use.

The database displayed here is where MMP will look for RUSLE2 climate, soil and management data. If you want to use climate, soil and management data that you've imported into a different database, or if your organization has a central RUSLE2 database that it uses (for example, on a network drive), click the Select button, then navigate to and select the database. Note that if you select a different database here, this overrides MMP's default selection behavior (see first two paragraphs).

Important! If you send an MMP plan file to someone or if you receive an MMP plan file from someone, the RUSLE2 database may need to be re-selected if its location or name is different from what's indicated here. Note that the recommended way of using RUSLE2 data with MMP is to have a RUSLE2 database with the same name as the plan file (but with a .gdb extension) and place this database in the same folder as the plan file so that MMP can find it automatically when you open the plan file.

Climate Location

Click the Select button and choose the climate location that is representative of the plan's fields.

Soil Survey

Click the Select button and choose the soil survey for the plan.

Tip: If the soil survey(s) in your RUSLE2 database use the official soil survey area names, MMP can usually determine which survey(s) to use automatically. In general you only need to select a soil survey if its name in the RUSLE2 database is non-standard.


RUSLE2 Data For Field

Soil Type

This is the RUSLE2 equivalent to the soil you selected for the field on the Fields panel.

Important! Normally the soil you select on the Fields panel should be the soil type that you will base your soil loss management on for the field. In RUSLE2 terms, this is the soil type for the field's "dominant critical area", which is defined as follows:

Dominant critical area -- This is the area of the field that represents the soil type, slope, and length of slope on which conservation treatment is based to reduce the field's soil loss to a tolerable level. This is not necessarily the soil that constitutes the largest portion of the field; nor is it necessarily the steepest or most erosive soil map unit if that soil makes up less than 10 percent of the field's area. In some cases by basing conservation treatment on the dominant critical area, this may allow 10-20% of the field to erode slightly above the tolerable soil loss by 2-3 tons/acre/year.

Tip: If the dominant critical area's soil is different from the soil you want to base your crop fertilizer recommendations on, consider subdividing the field by soil type.

Slope

If you entered a slope for the field on the Fields panel, it's displayed here; if you didn't enter a slope, the average of the soil type's slope range is displayed here. This value is what RUSLE2 will use for the field's slope.

Important! The slope you enter on the Fields panel should be the measured slope for the field's dominant critical area.

Slope Length

If you entered a slope length for the field on the Assessment panel, it's displayed here in the input box. You can also enter or edit the slope length here.

Note: Slope length is estimated from the point of origin of overland flow at the top of the slope to either the point where the slope flattens and significant deposition occurs or where the sheet and rill erosion processes end and concentrated flow begins. This latter slope termination condition is evidenced by concentrated channel flow and the formation of small gullies. Slope lengths are generally short on flat landscapes due to ponding, moderate on gently to moderately sloping landscapes, and short again on steep landscapes due to concentrated flow and gully formation. In general, slope lengths rarely exceed 300 feet and should be the length of slope for the field's dominant critical area.

Note: If you don't enter a slope length for a field, a slope length based on the field's slope will be used.

Rock Cover

You can enter the percent of the field's surface that is covered by rocks, rock fragments and coarse fragments. If you don't enter a rock cover value for a field, RUSLE2 will assume 0%.

Tip: See the RUSLE2 Program Users Guide for guidelines on estimating a field's rock cover.

Subsurface Drainage

If you selected a patterned drainage type on the Assessment panel, RUSLE2 will assume that the field is 100% drained and the system is functioning with an unrestricted outlet; if you selected a non-patterned drainage or left it blank, RUSLE2 will assume that the field has no subsurface drainage.

Contouring

If contouring is used in this field, click the Select button to open the RUSLE2 Contour System dialog box, where you can select the field's contour system.

Note: If you don't select a contour system for a field, RUSLE2 will use its default, rows up-and-down hill, which assumes that ridge-furrow orientation is parallel to land steepness.

Strips/Barriers

If strips or barriers are used in this field, click the Select button to open the RUSLE2 Strip-Barrier System dialog box, where you can select the field's type of filter or buffer strips. If you don't select a strip-barrier system for the field, RUSLE2 assumes that there is none.

Note: For filter strips and buffers to be selected here, they must be located within the field's representative length of slope. If the filter strip or buffer is along the edge of the field or along a stream corridor and beyond the slope length entered above, then the filter strip or buffer generally does not apply to RUSLE2 and you would not select it here.

Diversion/Terrace

If a terrace or diversion will be used to shorten the length of the slope, click the Select button to open the RUSLE2 Diversion/Terrace System dialog box, where you can select the field's type of diversion, terrace or Water and Sediment Control Basin (WASCOB). If you don't select a hydraulic-element system for the field, RUSLE2 assumes that there is none.

Tip: If terraces already exist in the field, do not select a terrace but rather change the slope length to represent the length of flow from the top of the hill to the first terrace or the length along the natural flow path between terraces. If terraces don't currently exist but are planned for the field and you want the field's soil loss estimate to reflect the effect of terraces, leave the slope length alone and select an appropriate terrace.

Residue Burial

Click the Select button to open the RUSLE2 Residue Burial Level dialog box, where you can adjust the level of residue burial relative to what RUSLE2 considers normal. If you don't adjust the residue burial level for a field, RUSLE2 will assume Normal res. burial.

Note: Normal residue burial represents optimal soil moisture content for field operations and normal operating depth and speed. You can adjust burial level when you know that normal conditions will not exist. As with all RUSLE2 inputs, assumptions about residue burial are based on long term average conditions rather than on extremes. Note that if a different residue burial rate is selected, the new burial rate will apply to all of the field's management operations.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the field's RUSLE2 data. You can enter up to 100 characters.


RUSLE2 Data For Crop

Management

Click the Select button to open the RUSLE2 Management dialog box, where you can select the current crop's management scenario. If the field has a double crop or if the main crop is preceded by a non-harvested cover crop, be sure to select a management for both crops.

Important! You can use a multi-crop or multi-year management with MMP. Just select it for the MMP crop that corresponds to the management's first crop. For example, with a double-crop management for wheat and soybeans harvested in the same year, select the double-crop management for the year's first crop in MMP (wheat). MMP will then use this management for both the wheat and the soybean crops. With a multi-year forage management, select the management for the forage crop's establishment (seeding) year if there is one in the MMP crop sequence.

Note that you will often need to select a multi-year management for something other than the field's first MMP crop. For example, to use a corn-soybean management with a field in the plan that has soybeans in the first year and corn in the second year, select the management for the MMP corn crop in the second year rather than the soybean crop.

Note: MMP will display a multi-crop or multi-year management in italics for the other crops covered by that management, indicating that you don't need to select a management for them. With multi-crop and multi-year managements, you only select the management for the MMP crop that corresponds to the first crop in the management. If the number of crops in the management is less than the number of crops for the field in MMP, you will need to select the management again for the MMP crop where the management crop sequence starts to repeat. Just be sure that all of the field's crops are covered by a management. If MMP displays "(Not selected)" for one of its crops, then that crop is not covered by a management.

Tip: You can create your own custom managements by clicking the Customize button. You can also edit RUSLE2's "canned" managements and save them as custom managements.

Note: Once you've selected a RUSLE2 management for a field, MMP indicates the months of the management's planting, tillage and harvest operations in the Nutrient Mgmt panel's Field Status grid by displaying P, T and H in the appropriate month cells.

Recommended way to use RUSLE2 managements with MMP

  1. Click the Customize button, then click Open in the RUSLE2 Custom Management Editor and browse the numerous single-year/single-crop managements.

  2. Identify the single-year/single-crop managements that you'll need for your plan. Note that you may also see managements in this group that are for more than one year (forages) or have more than one crop (double crops). Initially you may want to avoid these kinds of managements until you understand how multi-year/multi-crop managements are used with MMP.

  3. Open each single-year/single-crop management that you'll need, then click Save As and save it under "c. Other Local Mgt Records". (Tip: If you're using the same RUSLE2 .gdb database for multiple plans or sharing it with others, save your custom managements in a subfolder for your plan. Click Help in the Save RUSLE2 Management dialog for information on how to do this.)

  4. As needed, edit each custom management's date, etc.

  5. Select one of your custom managements for each of your MMP crops. Since this will be a relatively short list, locating the custom management you'll need will be much easier than picking one from the entire list of managements.


Other editor buttons

Check Data

Click this button to see if all required RUSLE2 data has been entered for the field. If something is missing, MMP will display an appropriate error message.

Tip: To check that MMP has enough data to calculate soil loss for all fields, you can run the Predicted Soil Erosion custom report under National USDA-NRCS Format Document Maker on the Tools dialog's Custom panel. If your state's phosphorus risk assessment tool uses RUSLE2 as an input, you can also run the assessment tool's custom report as a check.

Check P Risk

Click this button to generate the P index or P risk assessment report for the current field. Use this button to check if enough assessment data and RUSLE2 data have been entered for the field or to view the field's inherent risk prior to planning any P applications. It can also be used after planning P applications to see the final risk for a single field instead of running the risk report for the entire plan.

Duplicate

Click this button to duplicate the current field's data for other fields with the same crop rotation.

Field/Crop up-down arrows

To see the RUSLE2 data for a different field or crop, click the Field or Crop arrows at the bottom of the editor window.

Close

Click this button when you're done editing to exit the RUSLE2 Data Editor. You can also press the Esc key.

RUSLE2 Climate Location

Select the climate location for the plan. Typically this will be the same as the plan's state and county, but some counties may have multiple climate locations defined by the amount of annual rainfall.

RUSLE2 Soil Survey

If MMP can't determine what RUSLE2 soil survey to use, you may need to select the soil survey for the plan. In many cases the survey will correspond to a county. In some cases the survey may be for just part of the county or for parts of multiple counties combined into one survey.

Important! In many cases MMP can determine what RUSLE2 soil survey to use. It should then display the current field's RUSLE2 Soil Type even if you haven't selected a soil survey. If it doesn't, check the following:

  1. Have you selected a soil yet on the Fields panel for the current field?

  2. Does the soil survey in your RUSLE2 database use the official soil survey name?

  3. Is your RUSLE2 soil survey data up-to-date? If you suspect that it's not, you can obtain up-to-date RUSLE2 soil survey data that also uses the offical soil survey name using this Web-based "clipper" application:

If you need to select the survey yourself, be sure to select the survey that corresponds to the soils you select on the Fields panel. Note that the RUSLE2 soil survey name usually does not include the survey area's three-digit ID. To see the ID and name for the survey(s) used in the plan, click the Soil Info button on the Fields panel and scroll down to the bottom of the report. Note that some older RUSLE2 soil surveys may not be named exactly the same as the official soil survey name given at the bottom of the Soil Info report.

RUSLE2 Contour System

Select the field's contour system.

Note: If you don't select a contour system for a field, RUSLE2 will use its default, rows up-and-down hill, which assumes that ridge-furrow orientation is parallel to land steepness. You should also use this choice if there are no ridges present, since there will be no contouring effect without ridges.

Contouring assumes that ridge-furrow orientation is not parallel to land steepness. You select the type of contouring based on absolute row grade. Rows up-and-down hill means the row grade is the same as the slope grade (or a relative row grade of 100% -- see below). A row grade of 0% is the same as perfect contouring, which is unlikely to occur in actual field contouring.

Tip: With the standalone version of RUSLE2, you can select relative row grade 10% for standard contouring. However, in MMP the relative row grade choices have been omitted and you will need to select an "absolute row grade", which represents the grade of the contouring measured along the rows on the dominant critical area of the field. This requires no additional calculations on your part the way relative row grade does. Relative row grade is the ratio of the absolute row grade to flow path steepness. Example for relative row grade: If the slope of the land is 6% and the slope along the contour is 2%, the relative row grade is 2 divided by 6, or 33% "relative row grade". If you choose an "absolute row grade" of 2% you get the same soil loss, but with no need for a side calculation. To use the equivalent of the standard relative row grade 10%, choose an absolute row grade that is 1/10 of the land's slope.


RUSLE2 Strip-Barrier System

Select the field's type of filter or buffer strip. If you don't select a strip-barrier system for the field, RUSLE2 assumes that there is none.

Important! Only select something here if the filter strip or buffer is actually located within the measured "length of slope" for the field's "dominant critical area".

Normally when you select a filter strip or vegetated buffer, you should also fill in the Buffer Width column for the field on the Assessment panel. Similarly, if you fill in the Buffer Width column on the Assessment panel, you should also select a RUSLE2 strip-barrier system for the field. An exception to this would be a situation where the filter strip or buffer is along the edge of the field or along a stream corridor and the strip or buffer is intended to reduce the movement of nutrients leaving the field rather than reducing the field's erosion. In this case you would fill in the Buffer Width column but not select a RUSLE2 filter or buffer.


RUSLE2 Diversion/Terrace System

Select the field's type of diversion, terrace or Water and Sediment Control Basin (WASCOB). If you don't select a hydraulic-element system for the field, RUSLE2 assumes that there is none.

Important! Only select something here if a terrace or diversion will be installed to reduce the slope length. If the terrace or diversion is already installed, enter the measured length of slope for the origin of overland flow to the terrace channel (in the Slope Length box) instead of selecting a terrace or diversion system.


RUSLE2 Residue Burial Level

You can adjust the level of residue burial relative to what RUSLE2 considers normal. If you don't adjust the residue burial level for a field, RUSLE2 will assume Normal res. burial.

Caution! This adjustment is provided as a way to account for operator and equipment differences and the effects of soil moisture and local conditions on the level of residue burial. This adjustment applies to all of the field's operations. Note that reducing the residue burial level will likely result in a reduced estimate of soil loss. However, since this input cannot necessarily be verified by a field visit the way other inputs can, you should be prepared to document why the reduction is applicable if a plan reviewer asks about this deviation from RUSLE2's assumptions about normal residue burial.


RUSLE2 Management

In RUSLE2, a "management" is the sequence of expected field operations that will be performed for one or more crops. Field operations include planting, tillage and harvest operations, as well as any planned manure applications.

All managements are stored in the plan's RUSLE2 database (.gdb extension). Each management has a "file" name and is stored in a "folder" in the RUSLE2 database. Note that RUSLE2 files and folders are not the same as files and folders (directories) on your computer. RUSLE2 files and folders are only relevant inside the RUSLE2 database.

RUSLE2 groups managements into one or more geographic "crop management zones" (CMZ) in the RUSLE2 database. To see maps of all CMZ's in the U.S., refer to this link:

Each CMZ folder includes a number of "canned" managements that you can use if they match the sequence and timing of operations that will be performed on your plan's farm. These pre-built managements are based on crop rotations, tillage systems and operation dates that are common in that CMZ area and are stored in the CMZ's "a. Single Year/Single Crop Templates" and "b. Multi-year Rotation Templates" folders. You can browse these managements to see if they meet your needs.

Tip: If you're not familiar with the abbreviations used in the RUSLE2 management names, you may find this document helpful:

RUSLE2 also supports "custom" managements that you create yourself. These are stored in the CMZ's "c. Other Local Mgt Records" folder. To create your own custom managements, click the Customize button in the RUSLE2 Data Editor.

In the RUSLE2 Management dialog, when you click on a management in the upper box, MMP displays that management's operations in the lower grid. To select a management, click on it in the upper box and click the OK button. You can also double-click a management to select it and close the dialog box in one step.

Tip: If you need to blank out a crop's management, select the (no selection) choice from the list in the upper box.


RUSLE2 Custom Management Editor

You can use the RUSLE2 Custom Management Editor to create and edit your own custom managements. You can also edit one of RUSLE2's "canned" managements and then save it as a custom management.

If a management has not yet been selected for the current crop in the RUSLE2 Data Editor, the Custom Management Editor will display an empty grid that you can use to enter your custom management's operations. If a management has already been selected for the current crop, that management's operations will be displayed in the grid. You can edit these operations or click the New or Open buttons to create or open a different management.

New

Click this button to blank the operation grid for a new management.

Open

Click this button to select a different management to edit. You can select either a canned management or a custom management.

Save

Click this button to save a custom management to the plan's RUSLE2 database (.gdb extension). Note that this button will be disabled when you're editing a canned management, indicating that you have to use the Save As button to save it as a custom management.

Save As

Click this button to save a management as a custom management with a name you enter for it. If you've edited a canned management, you have to use this button to save the management.

Delete

Click this button to delete the current management from the plan's RUSLE2 database (.gdb extension). Note that this button will be disabled when you're editing a canned management.

Close

Click this button to exit the Custom Management Editor.

Notes on editing custom managements

  1. To add or delete rows in the operation grid, right-click the leftmost column of the grid and choose the appropriate command from the popup menu.

  2. Operations must be in chronological order before the management can be saved.

  3. Don't enter the actual year for the operation date. Instead, enter the year number relative to the start of the management. For example, if the first operation of a management will be performed on Oct 15, enter 10/15/1 for the operation's date. Browse the canned managements for examples of how dates should be entered.

    Tip: Dates for primary and secondary tillage, planting operations and row cultivation have been established for each Crop Management Zone (CMZ) or state within a CMZ. Refer to the pre-built examples in the CMZ's single- or multi-year management folders for these dates. These dates are based on long-term dates when certain operations are performed. In general these dates represent the dates when the majority of producers perform the operations within the CMZ area and represent an average year. Don't worry about unusually wet, dry, early or late conditions when planning for any particular year.

    Tip: The date of a grazing "operation" represents the end of the previous grazing period and the beginning of the regrowth period.

  4. The Date and Operation columns must be filled in for all operations. Planting operations and forage harvest operations will normally have the Vegetation column filled in as well. When you try to save the management, MMP will proof the management's operations and notify you if you've forgotten something that's required.

  5. You don't need to enter a yield for operations that have vegetation (planting, grazing, haying). When you save the management, RUSLE2 will set each yield to its default. When calculating soil loss, MMP will supply all harvest yields automatically based on the yield goals you entered on the Crops panel.

    Tip: One situation where you would probably want to set the yields yourself is when you have multiple grazing or haying operations in the same year and you want to vary the yields. Since you only enter the year's total yield on MMP's Crops panel, MMP will apportion this yield based on each management yield's fraction of the management's total yield for that year.

    Note: The units given for yields are RUSLE2's yield units. These may differ from what MMP uses for a crop. However, MMP will convert its yields to the proper RUSLE2 units when calculating soil loss.

  6. Don't enter manure applications in the management. MMP will automatically insert any manure applications from your plan when it calculates soil loss. If you enter any manure applications in the management, MMP will ignore them when it calculates soil loss. Enter your planned manure applications on MMP's Nutrient Mgmt panel.

  7. Include in the management all machinery passes across the field and any activities that can disturb the field's soil or residue.

  8. For a combination tool that's not in the list of operations, just enter each tool as a separate operation and use the same date for all operations that make up the actual combination tool.

  9. Managements normally end with a harvest operation. Don't add extra operations after the last harvest operation since they're not part of the management's last crop year, which ends with the last harvest.

  10. If tillage or seeding of cover crop occurs on the same day as harvest, this can confuse RUSLE2. To avoid confusing RUSLE2, you can set the date of these operations to the day following harvest.

  11. If you prefer, you can also edit custom managements with the standalone version of RUSLE2 if it's installed on your computer. After starting the standalone version of RUSLE2, look in the lower-right corner for the name of RUSLE2's default database. To edit a different RUSLE2 database, choose Database | Open alternate, then navigate to and select the database (.gdb extension) that you want to open.

Save RUSLE2 Management

In the input box, enter the name to use for the custom management. If you enter a name that's already in use, MMP will prompt whether you want to overwrite it with the new management.

In the upper box you can also select what custom management folder you want to save the management in. Note that you can't save a custom management to the folders where RUSLE2's canned managements are saved. You can only save custom managements under "c. Other Local Mgt Templates".

Note: If you want to save a custom management in its own folder under "c. Other Local Mgt Templates", include the folder in the management name, separated by a backslash. For example, to name your custom management "CustMgmt1" and save it in folder "MyMgmts", enter "MyMgmts\CustMgmt1".

Click the Save button when ready to save the management, or Cancel to exit without saving anything.


Check RUSLE2 Data

When you click the Check Data button in the RUSLE2 Data Editor, MMP attempts to calculate soil loss for the current field. If successful, it displays the complete list of operations for all of the field's crops, as well as the soil loss for each crop year.

In order to initialize RUSLE2 for the field, MMP also inserts the operations for the field's assumed previous crop. These operations are listed in italics.

Remember that the soil loss results displayed in this dialog box are only provisional. If you have not yet entered all of the field's planned manure or irrigation water applications, the soil loss results will likely change.

Click the Report button to generate a report with the field's RUSLE2 information. The name of the RUSLE2 database and the names of the calculated profile and calculated management that MMP creates in the database for the field will be listed at the top of the report in case you want to look at them in the standalone version of RUSLE2.


Duplicate RUSLE2 Data Dialog Box

Use the RUSLE2 Data Editor's Duplicate button to repeat RUSLE2 data for other fields.

All Fields With Same Crop Rotation

Select this option if you want to repeat the RUSLE2 data for all fields that have the same crop rotation as the current field.

Selected Fields With Same Crop Rotation

Select this option if you want to specify the fields that should receive the RUSLE2 data. Selecting this option enables the list of fields, where you can click the fields you want. Note that MMP will ignore fields you select if they don't have the same crop rotation as the current field.

Tip: Hold down the Shift key while selecting fields in the list with the mouse or keyboard to select a range of fields. You can also just drag the mouse up or down to select a range of fields. To select fields one at a time with the mouse, hold down the Ctrl key while selecting fields.


Storage Capacity Calculator

You can access the Storage Capacity Calculator by clicking the Calc button or pressing F2 from the Capacity column on the Storage panel.

Use this dialog box to calculate the current storage's capacity.

Follow these steps to calculate storage capacity:

  1. Select the Storage Facility Shape.

  2. Enter the facility's Dimensions.

  3. With solid manure, you can optionally enter the manure density to override the indicated default density.

  4. Click the Calculate button to view the calculated capacity.

  5. Click the Accept button to insert the calculated capacity into the current storage's Capacity column and close the calculator.

Notes

  1. The number of values you enter is determined by the selected shape.

  2. The Depth dimension is the total height of the facility, including its Freeboard.

Manure Transfer Editor

The Manure Transfer Editor can be accessed in either of two ways:

Use this dialog box to view, enter and edit manure transfers for the cell's storage and month.

The list box at the top of the editor window displays the manure transfers for the current storage cell. Click on a manure transfer to display its data in the input boxes below the list. If the list does not contain any transfers yet, you can add a transfer by clicking the New button (see notes below).

Amount

Enter the amount of manure to transfer, in the units indicated to the right of the input box.

Operation

With exported manure, enter the name of the operation receiving the manure; with imported manure, enter the name of the operation generating the manure. You can enter up to 30 characters. Note that this input box is disabled for internal transfers between storages.

Location

With exported manure, enter the location of the operation receiving the manure; with imported manure, enter the location of the operation generating the manure. You can enter the operation's town and state or other information. You can enter up to 30 characters. Note that this input box is disabled for internal transfers between storages.

Animal Type

With imported manure, select the type of animal that generated the manure.

Destination

With an internal transfer of manure, select the storage that will receive the manure.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the manure transfer. You can enter up to 100 characters.

New

Click this button to add a new manure transfer to the list for the current storage and month. You will be prompted to select the type of manure transfer from the following types: Once you've selected the type of transfer, MMP adds the transfer to the list and blanks the input boxes, where you can enter information about the transfer.

Tip: Refer to the instructions for defining a storage for imported manure (below).

Duplicate

Click this button to duplicate the currently selected manure transfer for the rest of the plan.

Delete

Click this button to delete the currently selected manure transfer. Tip: To delete all of a plan's manure transfers, use the Delete All Manure Transfers button on the Tools dialog box's Misc panel.

Close

Click this button when you're done editing to exit the Manure Transfer Editor. You can also press the Esc key.

Defining A Storage For Imported Manure

To associate a storage type and lab analysis with an operation's imported manure, you need to define a storage for the imported manure, even if the manure will be applied immediately once imported. The steps for doing this are as follows:
  1. Define a storage for the imported manure on the Storage panel.

    1. In the Storage ID column, enter a name such as "Imported manure", etc.

    2. In the Storage Type column, if the manure will be applied shortly after importing, select the type of storage where the manure was stored on the originating operation. If the manure will be stored for a while after importing, select the type of storage where the manure will be stored on the plan's operation. (In some states, knowing how the manure was stored is important in determining the manure's nitrogen availability. Select the storage type that's most applicable to your situation.)

    3. In the Capacity column, enter the maximum amount of imported manure that can be handled at one time.

    4. In the On Hand column, enter 0 unless there will be some leftover imported manure of this type on hand at the start of the plan.

    5. In general, you should not select this storage on the Animals panel.

  2. Enter the imported manure's analysis on the Analysis panel:

    1. In the Measured columns, enter the manure's lab analysis (or book values if no lab analysis is available).

    2. In the Measured Manure Production column, enter 0.

    3. In the Source column, enter the source of the manure analysis.
Once the import storage has been defined, you can import manure into it during the expected months on the Nutrient Mgmt panel. Once manure has been imported, you can begin applying it just as you would manure generated on the operation.

Note: If you import manure into a storage that already has manure, the imported manure takes on that manure's analysis. If you don't want this, you will need to adjust the analysis manually to account for the effects of mixing imported manure with existing manure, keeping in mind that this adjustment affects all applications from that storage. In general, it's best to define a separate storage for imported manure so you can enter an analysis that's used only with the imported manure.


Duplicate Manure Transfer Dialog Box

Enter the number of months between each duplicated manure transfer. For example, if you enter 1, MMP will duplicate the currently selected manure transfer in every month for the rest of the plan. If you enter 6, MMP will duplicate the transfer every 6 months for the rest of the plan.

Manure Application Rate Calculator

The Manure Application Rate Calculator can be accessed in either of two ways: Use this dialog box to calculate the current manure application's rate.

You can calculate the rate based on various criteria. In the Calculate Rate Based On list box, select the basis you want to use for the rate calculation. If the plan data required for the calculation has been entered, MMP calculates and displays the rate and enables the Accept button; if any required data is missing, MMP indicates what's missing and disables the Accept button.

The actual wording of each basis differs from state to state. Here are some common rate calculations:

Custom

Select this item if you've already entered a custom rate that should be used instead of a calculated rate. MMP can then calculate the number of loads to apply at the custom rate just as it does with a calculated rate.

Maximum allowable rate

Select this item if you want MMP to use your state's phosphorus risk assessment tool to determine automatically the highest rate that is acceptable to the tool. This rate will never be higher than the N-based rate.

Tip: Even if you're using a custom rate or a different calculated rate basis, you can select this item to make sure your planned rate is not greater than the maximum allowable rate. If the planned rate is okay, you can then select the custom or other rate basis and click Accept; if the rate is too high, select a different rate basis or click Cancel and enter a lower custom rate in the Rate column.

Recommended N-based rate

Select this item to calculate the rate based on the crop's recommended N or, in the case of legumes, the maximum amount of N that should be applied. Losses as a result of application method will generally be taken into account when determining the rate.

Crop P Needs

Select one of these items to calculate the rate based on the crop's P2O5 recommendation or removal, whichever is greater, for the indicated number of years.

Crop K Needs

Select one of these items to calculate the rate based on the crop's K2O recommendation or removal, whichever is greater, for the indicated number of years.

Accept

Once this button has been enabled, you can click it to insert the calculated application rate and number of loads to apply into the Rate and Loads columns in the bottom grid on the Nutrient Mgmt panel.

Rate Info

Click this button to view a report that explains each rate basis in the list box.

Tip: Some state-specific notes include additional information about the state's various rate choices.

Details

Click this button to view a report that shows what nutrient applications have been made so far to the field.

Notes

  1. MMP's calculated rate may exceed what can be applied in a single day. If so, the rate may need to be split into multiple applications at a lower rate when the manure is actually applied.

  2. MMP may reduce a P- and K-based rate so as to avoid exceeding the N-based rate. If a rate is reduced, this will be indicated in the message displayed with the rate.

  3. MMP may increase a rate so as to avoid an unrealistic rate that is below the application equipment's minimum rate. If a rate is increased, this will be indicated in the message displayed with the rate.

  4. If MMP indicates that the calculated rate differs from the application's current rate, this probably means that you changed some of the plan's data since the application's rate was previously calculated. It could also mean that the state's fertilizer recommendations or other data have changed, for example if you installed a newer version of MMP. Click Accept to use the new rate based on the current data.

  5. With spreaders, MMP calculates the number of whole loads for the application. With a small field this can result in more manure being allocated than needed if only part of the last load will be used to finish the field. You can fine-tune the amount of manure to apply in the Manure Applications grid by reducing the Amount Applied value until the Area Covered is equal to or only slightly greater than the field's spreadable area (displayed in the Field Status grid).

Duplicate Manure Application

Select the group of fields that you might want to duplicate the selected manure application for.

Fields With Same Target Crop

Select this option if you want to duplicate the manure application for some or all of the fields that have the same target crop as the currently selected application's field.

Fields With Same Previous Crop

Select this option if you want to duplicate the manure application for some or all of the fields that have the same previous crop as the currently selected application's field.

Fields With Same Target And Previous Crops

Select this option if you want to duplicate the manure application for some or all of the fields that have the same target and previous crops as the currently selected application's field.

Selected Fields

Select this option if you want to specify the fields that should receive the same manure application. Selecting this option enables the list of fields, where you can click the fields you want.

Tip: Hold down the Shift key while selecting fields in the list with the mouse or keyboard to select a range of fields. You can also just drag the mouse up or down to select a range of fields. To select fields one at a time with the mouse, hold down the Ctrl key while selecting fields.

Note: Selecting the group of fields here does not actually duplicate the manure application. That is done in the next step in the Manure Application Candidates dialog.


Manure Application Candidates

MMP uses the grid to display information about the group of fields that you selected in the Duplicate Manure Application dialog.

To calculate the rate for the duplicated applications for all fields, click the Calc All button.

To select a candidate application for duplication, check the Plan This App box. This will also calculate the rate if you haven't already done that. To unselect an application, uncheck the box.

Once you have selected at least one application and the Available amount of manure is not negative, MMP enables the OK button. Click the OK button to duplicate the selected manure applications and close the dialog box. If the Available amount is negative, you will need to unselect one or more manure applications before you can click OK.

To close the dialog box without making any manure applications, click the Cancel button.


Fertilizer Application Editor

The Fertilizer Application Editor can be accessed in either of two ways: Use this dialog box to view, enter and edit fertilizer and irrigation water applications for the cell's field and month.

The editor displays important information about the field at the top of the window, including the field's current nutrient status compared to the crop's fertilizer recommendations and nutrient removal. If the field has a non-spreadable area that does not receive manure, the editor displays the nutrient status for that area too. If a fert rec status number is negative (-) and green, this means that more of that nutrient can be applied. If a fert rec status number is positive and red, this means that the field's fert rec has been met and that no more of that nutrient should be applied. For information about the nutrient applications that have been made to this field, click the Details button.

To move to a different field or month, click the Field and Month arrows at the bottom of the window.

The list box below the nutrient status information displays the fertilizer applications for the current field and month. Click on a fertilizer application to display its data in the input boxes below the list. If the list does not contain any applications yet, you can add a fertilizer or irrigation water application by clicking the New button.

To repeat an application for similar fields, use the Duplicate button (see notes below).

Note: Producers may not apply fertilizer if only a small amount is recommended. For example, a producer may not apply P2O5 or K2O fertilizer unless at least 25 Lb/A of P2O5 or 50 Lb/A of K2O is recommended, electing instead to skip the application altogether or apply a multi-year recommendation so as to make the extra field operation worthwhile.

New

Click this button to add a fertilizer application to the list for the current field and month. This brings up the New Fertilizer Application dialog box, where you select how the application's nutrient content will be specified: Once you've selected the type of application, MMP adds the application to the list and blanks the input boxes, where you can enter information about the application, as discussed below. MMP also displays an "F" at the right side of the currently selected cell on the Field Status grid to indicate that the field has at least one fertilizer application that month.

N

With fertilizer analysis applications, enter the N analysis in %. With nutrient amount applications, enter the amount of N that will be applied in Lb/A. With irrigation water applications, enter the water nitrate analysis in ppm.

P2O5

With fertilizer analysis applications, enter the P2O5 analysis in %. With nutrient amount applications, enter the amount of P2O5 that will be applied in Lb/A. This input box is disabled with irrigation water applications.

K2O

With fertilizer analysis applications, enter the K2O analysis in %. With nutrient amount applications, enter the amount of K2O that will be applied in Lb/A. This input box is disabled with irrigation water applications.

Form

With fertilizer analysis applications, select Dry or Liquid. This input box is disabled with nutrient amount and irrigation water applications.

Tip: Select Dry with anhydrous ammonia applications (82-0-0) so you can enter a rate in Lb/A.

Tip: Refer to the list of common commercial fertilizers for additional analyses (below).

Rate

With fertilizer analysis applications, enter the application rate in Lb/A or Gal/A depending on whether you selected Dry or Liquid for Form. With irrigation water applications, enter the rate in In/A. This input box is disabled with nutrient amount applications.

Calculate

With fertilizer analysis applications, you can click this button once you've entered the fertilizer's complete analysis and selected its form. This brings up the Fertilizer Application Rate Calculator, where you select the nutrient to target and the amount of nutrient to apply. This button is disabled with nutrient amount and irrigation water applications.

Method

Select the application's method.

Include Fertilizer When Calculating Field's Manure Application Rate

Check this box with starter fertilizers and irrigation water applications or any application where the application's nutrients should be taken into account when calculating a manure application rate for the field.

Apply Fertilizer To

Select Entire Field if the fertilizer will be applied to the entire field.

Select Spreadable Area if the fertilizer will be applied only to the part of the field that can receive manure.

Select Non-Spreadable Area if the fertilizer will be applied only to the part of the field that cannot receive manure.

Note that Spreadable Area and Non-Spreadable Area will be disabled if the field's Spreadable Size on the Fields panel is blank or the same as the field's Total Size.

Notes

Enter notes or other information about the fertilizer application. You can enter up to 100 characters.

Duplicate

Click this button to duplicate the currently selected fertilizer application. This brings up the Duplicate Fertilizer Application dialog box, where you select the fields that should also receive this application and whether you want the application duplicated only in the current year or in future years as well.

Tip: Be sure you've completely finished the current application before duplicating it. This includes checking the Include Fertilizer box if applicable and selecting the appropriate area that the fertilizer will be applied to.

Delete

Click this button to delete the currently selected fertilizer application.

Tip: To delete all of a plan's fertilizer applications, use the Delete All Fertilizer Applications button on the Tools dialog box's Misc panel.

Close

Click this button when you're done editing to exit the Fertilizer Application Editor. You can also press the Esc key.

Common Commercial Fertilizers


New Fertilizer Application Dialog Box

Select how the new application's nutrient content will be specified:

Fertilizer Nutrient Analysis And Application Rate

Select this type of application if you know the analysis of the fertilizer that will be applied.

Amount Of One Or More Nutrients

Select this type of application if you don't know the analysis of the fertilizer that will be applied but you want to indicate how much nutrient(s) will be applied. This can be useful if you know that fertilizer will be applied but you don't know the particular product that will be used.

Irrigation Water N Analysis And Application Rate

Select this type of application for irrigation water applications that contain nitrates that you want to take credit for.

Duplicate Fertilizer Application Dialog Box

Use the Fertilizer Application Editor's Duplicate button to repeat a fertilizer application for other fields and/or years.

All Fields With Same Crop

Select this option if you want to repeat the application for all fields that have the same crop as the currently selected application's field.

Selected Fields

Select this option if you want to specify the fields that should receive the same application. Selecting this option enables the list of fields, where you can click the fields you want.

Selected Fields With Same Crop

Select this option if you want to specify the fields that should receive the same application, but you only want those selected fields with the same crop as the application's field. Selecting this option enables the list of fields, where you can click the fields you want.

Tip: Hold down the Shift key while selecting fields in the list with the mouse or keyboard to select a range of fields. You can also just drag the mouse up or down to select a range of fields. To select fields one at a time with the mouse, hold down the Ctrl key while selecting fields.

Duplicate In Future Years Too

Check this box if you want the application to be duplicated in future years too. Leave this box unchecked if you only want the application to be duplicated in the current year.

Notes

  1. When duplicating a multi-year P or K application in future years, MMP skips intervening years. For example, with a two-year application, MMP duplicates it only in every other year.

  2. MMP won't duplicate the application for a field that already has the same application that month.

  3. When duplicating an application whose rate was calculated using the Calculate button, MMP recalculates the rate for the duplicated applications' fields.

Fertilizer Application Rate Calculator

Use the Fertilizer Application Editor's Calculate button to calculate a rate for the application's analysis based on a target nutrient and amount of the nutrient to apply.

Nutrient To Target

Select N, P2O5 or K2O. MMP attempts to calculate a rate for that nutrient and the currently selected number of years. If successful, it displays the rate at the bottom of the dialog box and enables the Accept button.

Amount Of Nutrient To Apply

Select the number of years of nutrient to apply. MMP attempts to calculate a rate for that number of years and the currently selected nutrient. If successful, it displays the rate at the bottom of the dialog box and enables the Accept button.

You can also select the Specified option to enter the amount of nutrient to apply rather than base it on the field's nutrient deficit.

Note that you can't select a multi-year amount with N.

Specified Nutrient Amount

If the Specified option is selected, this input box is enabled, where you can enter the amount of nutrient to apply. Press the Tab key when done typing the amount. MMP attempts to calculate a rate that supplies that amount of the currently selected nutrient. If successful, it displays the rate at the bottom of the dialog box and enables the Accept button.

Accept

Once this button has been enabled, you can click it to insert the calculated application rate into the Rate input box on the Fertilizer Application Editor.

State-Specific Notes

Many of these notes pertain to soil test data and fertilizer recommendations. If you're not getting the fert recs you expect, be sure to review the notes for your state or province.


Alabama Notes

  1. In calculating N recommendations, MMP assumes 1 ton per cutting with warm perennial grasses and 2 tons per cutting with bermuda hay.

  2. Alabama fertilizer recommendations assume that the Mehlich-1 extract was used with soils in groups 1-3 and that the Mississippi extract was used with soils in group 4 (clayey soils from Black Belt counties).

  3. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the CEC Group column is the soil's CEC group and is used in generating Alabama Extension fertilizer recommendations. The possible values for CEC Group are as follows:

    The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.


Alberta Notes

  1. At a minimum, be sure to enter the following soil test data for each field: P, K, NO3-N, and EC. If the P and K values are in ppm, be sure to leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked.

  2. MMP assumes in Alberta that the nitrate soil test value is the average nitrate level for a 24" sample (60 cm). If you have three nitrate soil test values (for 0-6" depth, 6-12" depth, and 12-24" depth), convert the three soil test nitrate values to a single average and enter it in the NO3-N column on the Soil Tests panel. Use this equation to average the three nitrate values. Note that the nitrate values must be in ppm.

    You can also use this equation for equivalent metric depths (0-15, 15-30 and 30-60 cm).

    MMP multiplies the NO3-N value you enter by 8 to get the nitrate credit in Lb/A.

    Tip: If you have NO3-N values in Lb/A, divide each value by 8 to get ppm. Note that your NO3-N value must be the total Lb/A for a 24" sample.

  3. If a field is irrigated, be sure to check its Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel. This information is used with most crops in determining crop nitrogen needs.

  4. Alberta fertilizer recommendations use crop target yields to estimate nitrogen requirements. These crops include:

    For crops that do not have yield-based recommendations, MMP defaults to a maximum nitrogen requirement based either on soil group or on irrigation and crop legume content. With these crops, changing the planned yield will have no effect on the nitrogen recommended. With all crops, nitrogen recommendations are reduced by the amount of soil nitrate N credit.

  5. Enter your own manure lab analysis or book values on the Analysis panel to override MMP's excretion-based estimate. If you do so, be sure also to enter your own estimate of annual manure production in the Measured Manure Production column on the Analysis panel.

  6. In Alberta, gallons refer to imperial gallons (1 imperial gallon = 1.201 U.S. gallons).

  7. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The values in three of the report columns need some explanation:

    Drainage indicates the soil's drainage class, as follows:

    Soil Group is the soil group, as follows:

    Imperv. Layer indicates whether the soil has a restricting layer, as follows:

    This is used in lieu of MMP's standard Bedrock Depth, which is blank for all soils in Alberta.

  8. MMP supports the importing of data into an Alberta plan from a standard dBASE (or CSV) field data import file. In general, the import data specifications are the same as what's documented in ImportDbfSpec.doc (located in the TechDocs folder), except for the following differences:

    A blank template file in the proper import format (ImportTemplate_Alberta.dbf) can be found in the TechDocs folder.

  9. Clicking the Blank Data Collection Form link in MMP's About box displays a blank form that can be used to collect an operation's data. This form can be used to collect data for Alberta operations that use imperial units. To display a blank form that can be used with metric data, start Windows Explorer and double-click file BlankForm_Metric.doc in the Samples folder.

    Clicking the Sample Data Collection Form link in MMP's About box displays the data collection form with sample data filled in. To generate a sample form like this for Alberta, open one of the Alberta sample plans and run the Manure Management Plan Data Report in MMP's list of custom tools.

  10. Several of the frequently asked questions (FAQs) in the program help do not apply to Alberta:

  11. Ignore the FSA columns on the Fields panel -- these columns are for USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) field identifiers.

  12. Since an Alberta plan can be in all metric units or all imperial units, but not in a mix of units, you may need to convert some of your input data if the data are in a mix of metric and imperial units:

    To convert yields or application rates in tons/acre to tonnes/hectare, divide the tons/acre by 0.446. Multiply tonnes/hectare by 0.446 to get tons/acre.

    To convert yields in bushels/acre to kg/hectare, divide the bushels/acre by appropriate factor depending on the bushel weight. Multiply kg/hectare by the factor to get bushels/acre.

    To convert yields or fertilizer recommendations in pounds/acre to kg/hectare, divide the pounds/acre by 0.892. Multiply kg/hectare by 0.892 to get pounds/acre.

    To convert application rates in imperial gallons/acre to litres/hectare, divide the gallons/acre by 0.089. Multiply litres/hectare by 0.089 to get imperial gallons/acre.

    To convert pounds to kilograms, divide the pounds by 2.205. Multiply kilograms by 2.205 to get pounds.

    To convert imperial gallons to litres, divide the gallons by 0.22. Multiply litres by 0.22 to get imperial gallons.

    To convert tons to tonnes, divide the tons by 1.102. Multiply tonnes by 1.102 to get tons.

    To convert acres to hectares, divide the acres by 2.471. Multiply hectares by 2.471 to get acres.

  13. Three sample plans for Alberta are included with MMP and are located in the Samples folder. Alberta_Beef1_Metric.mmp is the same example as Alberta_Beef1.mmp but with all operation data converted to metric units.

    Notes and assumptions about the Alberta_Beef1.mmp sample plan:

    1. At any given time in the feedlot there is a mix of 1,300 finishers and 1,700 growers. This mix of animals will produce about 5,700 tons of manure annually in the feedlot. Additionally, there are 300 cows on pasture whose manure is not collected.

    2. Fields G and J,K,L are not available for manure application. In addition, fields F1 and F3 have soil nitrate levels greater than 25 ppm (200 Lb/A) and so were not used for manure application.

    3. All planned manure application rates were based on crop N need except for the custom rate to field M2 in Oct. 2005.

    4. 1,000 cubic yards (about 540 tons) of composted manure are exported annually. Annual clean-out is done in Sept. and exporting off-farm is done in May. Annual clean-out is shown as a transfer of 540 tons each Sept. from the feedlot pile to the compost pile. Exporting is shown as an off-farm export of 540 tons each May from the compost pile.

    5. 1,000 cubic yards (about 540 tons) of feedlot manure are stockpiled during the winter months. This is shown as a transfer of 180 tons each Dec., Jan. and Feb. from the feedlot pile to the field pile.

    6. Each May about 800 to 1,000 tons of manure from the feedlot pile and the 540 tons from the field pile are land applied.

    7. Each Sept. about 3,000 to 3,500 tons of manure from the feedlot pile are land applied.

    Notes and assumptions about the Alberta_Beef2.mmp sample plan:

    1. Only the crop portion of field SW30-47-1W4 receives manure, so it was split into two fields of 80 acres each, one in grass, and the other in corn silage.

    2. Only half of field NW19-47-1 receives manure at a time, so it was split into two fields of 80 acres each, both in barley silage.

    3. All of the manure is hauled from the pens and land applied in Sept.

    4. 28-0-0 commercial N fertilizer is surface broadcast to the grass fields each April and surface broadcast with incorporation to the silage and barley fields each May.

    5. No applications of commercial P2O5 or K2O fertilizers were planned since no K2O is needed and only 10 Lb/A of P2O5 are needed.

Arizona Notes

  1. MMP requires soil test nitrate data (NO3-N) to calculate crop N fertilizer recommendations. MMP uses it for all years of the plan.

  2. MMP assumes that soil was sampled to a depth of 12" for NO3-N.

  3. Be sure to enter the soil organic matter (OM). If you don't have soil test lab results for OM, you can enter the midpoint of the soil's OM range from the soil survey. Click the Soil Info button on the Fields panel to see soil survey data.

  4. Hay and pasture yields should be entered as tons of dry material. Yields for silage should be entered as tons of wet material. Vegetable crop yields should be entered in the indicated units and assume fresh yields in most cases. Note that these crops do assume dry yields: red chile, pinto beans, dry peas.

  5. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HzKsat column is the soil's saturated hydraulic conductivity data, where each pair of numbers (separated by a comma) consists of a horizon's depth (in centimeters) and the horizon's ksat (in um/sec).

Arkansas Notes

  1. Several obsolete crops are included for backward compatibility with plans created by earlier versions of MMP. These crops are prefixed with "x" and sort to the bottom of the alphabetical crop list on the Crops panel. Do not select these crops with new plans.

  2. If Ca or Soil pH is not entered on the Soil Tests panel, MMP uses the soil's surface texture to determine textural class.

  3. With rice, MMP starts with a base N rec of 120 Lb/A. Many cultivars have a higher base N rec than this. Consult the Rice Production Recommendations table on pages B27 - B29 of University of Arkansas Lime and Fertilizer Recommendations. If the total N rec for your cultivar differs from 120, adjust the Default N Rec value on the Crops panel by the difference and enter this value in the Custom N Rec column.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

California Notes

  1. The Default N Rec on the Crops panel is based on 1.4 times the crop's N removal rate. This is derived from preliminary recommendations of regional experts. The Default P Rec and Default K Rec are based on the crop's P and K removal rates. To see crop removal rates, click the Crop Info button on the Crops panel.

  2. The Pumpable Or Spreadable Capacity on the Storage panel for ponds and lagoons is defined as the total storage volume minus the emergency storage volume required for the 25 year/24 hour storm.

  3. The Measured Manure Production value on the Analysis panel should include animal waste volume, barn water volume, and normal rainfall and runoff volume. Do not include rainfall and runoff volume for the 25 year/24 hour storm.

  4. For fields that are manured annually, check the Manure Applied Annually box on the Assessment panel. When this box is checked, MMP assumes that manure available N has reached a "steady state" in which effectively all manure N will be available during the current crop year once residual N from previous years has been accounted for. For fields that are not manured every year, leave this box unchecked. MMP will then calculate manure available N using the process described in the USDA-NRCS Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook.

Colorado Notes

  1. MMP assumes that the soil test nitrate value entered in the NO3-N column is the depth-weighted average concentration in the top 24" of soil. If you have two sample depth values, average them as follows:

    Example: 0-8" sample is 18 ppm, 8-24" sample is 7 ppm:

    If you only have a single value for a 0-12" sample, multiply the value (in ppm) by 0.835 to estimate the 0-24" concentration.

  2. If known, select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Olsen test was used.

  3. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

  4. CSU nitrogen fertilizer recommendations generally assume that about 30 Lb/A of N become available for each percent of organic matter in the soil. For field elevations above 7000 feet, where only 10 Lb/A may become available for each percent organic matter, you can increase MMP's N rec by 20 x soil test OM. Enter this higher N rec in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel to override MMP's default N rec. Note that MMP's irrigated winter wheat N recs in the San Luis Valley have already been increased by 40 Lb/A over the standard winter wheat N rec.

  5. MMP's potato N recs are for eastern Colorado. N recs for the San Luis Valley can be found in the CSU source bulletin (0.541). Enter these recs in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel to override the default eastern Colorado potato N recs.

  6. MMP's P recs for most Colorado crops are for broadcast applications. Where a banded recommendation is also available (see source bulletin), the banded P rec is one half the broadcast P rec. You can enter a reduced P rec in the Custom P2O5 Rec column on the Crops panel to override the default broadcast P rec.

  7. MMP calculates K recs for irrigated forages and dryland alfalfa new seeding for each year of production. However, three years' worth of K recs would typically be applied at one time for these crops.

  8. No CSU fert recs are available for soybeans, cabbage, carrots, lettuce, onions or spinach. With these crops, enter your own recs in the Custom Rec columns on the Crops panel.

  9. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class. The value in the TFact column is the soil tolerable loss factor, in tons/acre/year.

Connecticut Notes

  1. Connecticut's fert recs assume that the UConn modified Morgan extraction was used to determine soil test levels.

  2. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class.

Delaware Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are University of Delaware FIV values.

  2. If you are entering soil test data from University of Delaware or University of Maryland labs, be sure to leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. These labs report P, K, Ca and Mg data as Fertility Index Values (FIV), which are unitless.

  3. If you are entering soil test data from A&L Eastern Laboratories, be sure to select the correct soil test package that was run (Bray P1 or Mehlich-3).

  4. If you are entering soil test data from Agri Analysis, be sure to enter the phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and calcium values (lbs/A) and check the Levels Are In Lb/A box. Do not use the P2O5, K2O or MgO values.

  5. If you are entering soil test data from Brookside Laboratories, be sure to enter the values that are in ppm and leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. Do not use the lb/A values. If more than one phosphorus test is reported, use the "Easily Extractable" ppm of P value.

  6. If you are entering soil test data from Spectrum Analytic, select Bray P1 if you did not specifically request Mehlich-3 results from the lab. Spectrum runs Mehlich-3 but normally converts to and reports Bray P1 and ammonium acetate results.

  7. Corn for grain and corn silage P2O5 fertilizer recommendations assume banded application.

  8. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class. The value in the KwFact column is the soil's erodibility factor. The value in the Horiz1 Dep column is the first soil horizon's depth, in centimeters.

Florida Notes

  1. In calculating fertilizer recommendations, MMP assumes 2 tons per cutting for bermuda, stargrass, digitgrass, rhodesgrass, bahia, limpograss and alfalfa, 1 ton per cutting with ryegrass hay, and 2.5 tons per cutting with ryegrass haylage.

  2. Fertilizer recommendations for warm-season hay crops assume split applications.

  3. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Georgia Notes

  1. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Coastal/Piedmont column indicates whether or not the soil is considered a coastal plain soil and is used in generating Georgia Extension fertilizer recommendations. The possible values for Coastal/Piedmont are as follows:

    The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters.


Idaho Notes

  1. The following abbreviations are used in Idaho crop names:

  2. Select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. In southern Idaho, only Olsen is supported; in northern Idaho, Bray P1, Morgan and Olsen are supported.

Illinois Notes

  1. Corn N recs were determined by version 1.8 of the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/nRate.aspx

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate for the appropriate region of the state (north, central, southern) using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    With border counties, soil OM is used to select the geographic region. If soil OM is greater than 3%, the northern of the two regions is used; otherwise, the southern of the two regions is used. See this map for more information:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/Maps.aspx#illinois

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the calculator or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. For alfalfa, enter a value greater than 70 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are 5 or more alfalfa plants per square foot. If there are 2 to 4 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 30-70 for Legume % Stand. If there are less than 2 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value less than 30 for Legume % Stand.

  3. Grass N recs (other than Bluegrass) assume a split application.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Subsoil P column is the soil's subsoil phosphorus-supplying power. The value in the CEC column is the soil's cation exchange capacity. These values are used in generating Illinois Extension fertilizer recommendations.

    The possible values for Subsoil P are as follows:

    The possible values for CEC are as follows:

    Note that the value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the TFact column is the soil tolerable loss factor, in tons/acre/year.


Indiana Notes

  1. Corn N recs were determined by version 1.8 of the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/nRate.aspx

    Additional information is given in the March 2017 version of "Nitrogen Management Guidelines for Corn in Indiana":

    https://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/corn/news/timeless/NitrogenMgmt.pdf

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate for the appropriate region of the state using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the publication or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. The Tri-State fertilizer recommendations used in Indiana and Ohio assume that CEC is estimated by summation. If the CEC values from your soil testing lab were not estimated by summation, leave CEC blank on the Soil Tests panel and let MMP estimate CEC. Note that you must enter K, Ca, Mg and Buffer pH for MMP to be able to estimate CEC. Some labs don't report buffer pH if it is greater than 7. If this is the case with some of your buffer pH values, enter 7 for these missing buffer pH values and note this in the Notes column.

  3. Indiana rate choices in the Manure Application Rate Calculator.

    For new plans, be sure to select only from the plant available N (PAN) rate choices. The older storage available N (SAN) rate choices are still included for compatibility with previously created plans, but new plans should use the PAN rate choices.

    1-year crop N need: With this rate choice, MMP calculates a rate that meets the 1-year crop N need. With non-legumes, this is the crop N fertilizer recommendation on the Crops panel. With legumes, the rate supplies 150 Lb/A plant available N (PAN). Plant available N is determined based on target crop, application timing and application method. Note that MMP limits the amount of N that can be applied in Sept. or Oct. (or Nov. in southern Indiana) for annuals with or without cover crop (or Sept. for small grains), or in July or Aug. for annuals or small grains following a small grain crop. This may result in a rate that does not supply the full crop N need.

    This rate choice is intended for fields with a soil test P level less than or equal to 50 ppm.

    1.5 x 1-year crop P need: With this rate choice, MMP calculates a rate that supplies 1.5 times the 1-year crop P2O5 need, not to exceed the 1-year crop N rate as determined above. P need is the greater of the crop's P2O5 fertilizer recommendation or the amount of P2O5 removed from the field in the harvested portion of the crop.

    This rate choice is intended for fields with a soil test P level in the 51-100 ppm range.

    1-year crop P need: This rate choice is the same as the previous rate except MMP uses 1.0 instead of 1.5 times the crop P2O5 need.

    This rate choice is intended for fields with a soil test P level in the 101-200 ppm range.

    Multi-year crop P need: With these rate choices, MMP looks at the planned crop rotation in determining multi-year P needs. These rate choices are intended for fields with a soil test P level in the 51-100 ppm range (1.5 x rates) and the 101-200 ppm range (1.0 x rates) and assume no additional manure will be applied for the indicated number of years.

    Refer to the current Indiana USDA-NRCS Field Office Technical Guide (FOTG) nutrient management standard (590) for additional application rate guidelines.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan.

    The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters.

    The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class.

    The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class.

    The value in the Monthly Flooding column gives the soil's flooding frequency for each month of the year, where F = frequently floods and N = does not frequently flood in the corresponding month.

    The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class.

    The value in the TFact column is the soil tolerable loss factor, in tons/acre/year.

    The value in the WEI column is the soil's wind erodibility index.

    The value in the NLI column is the soil's nitrate leaching index.

    The value in the KfFact column is the soil's erodibility factor.

    The value in the Slope Len column is the soil's typical slope length, in meters.


Iowa Notes

  1. Corn N recs were determined by version 1.8 of the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/nRate.aspx

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the calculator or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. If known, select the test that was used to determine the field's soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Bray P1 test was used (with a dried sample) if the field's soil pH is < 7.4 and that the Olsen test was used (with a dried sample) if soil pH is >= 7.4.

  3. All supported phosphorus tests include "dry" or "moist" to indicate the sample handling procedure used in the soil testing laboratory. Note that the choice of sampling handling procedure affects K recs, but not P recs.

  4. N fertilizer recommendations for grass pasture and hay assume a split application.

  5. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Subsoil P column is the soil's subsoil phosphorus level. The value in the Subsoil K column is the soil's subsoil potassium level. The value in the Texture column is the soil's texture. The value in the CSR column is the soil's Corn Suitability Rating.

    Note that Subsoil P, Subsoil K and CSR are no longer used in generating Iowa Extension fertilizer recommendations.

    The possible values for Subsoil P are as follows:

    The possible values for Subsoil K are as follows:

    The possible values for Texture are as follows:

    CSR values range from 0 to 100.

    The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class, the value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group, and the value in the Perm. Code column is the soil's permeability code, which ranges from 0 (very rapid) to 90 (very slow).


Kansas Notes

  1. MMP uses a 6-year build time frame when calculating Kansas State P and K fertilizer recommendations.

  2. If known, select the test that was used to determine the field's soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Bray P1 test was used.

  3. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP only uses it for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan. For subsequent years (or if no soil nitrate value is entered for a field), MMP assumes a 30 Lb/A nitrate credit.

  4. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by 7.2 to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  5. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

  6. KSU publication MF-2586 suggests increasing the N rec by 20 Lb/A for cool season crops that are no-tilled. You may also need to increase the N rec for no-tilled cool season crops following alfalfa or clover by half of the normal legume N credit. Enter the adjusted N rec in the Custom N Rec column on MMP's Crops panel to override MMP's default N rec.

  7. KSU publication MF-2586 suggests increasing the N rec for cool season crops that are grazed by 40 Lb/A per 100 pounds of beef weight gain per acre. Enter the adjusted N rec in the Custom N Rec column on MMP's Crops panel to override MMP's default N rec.

  8. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class. The value in the KwFact column is the soil's erodibility factor.

Kentucky Notes

  1. With corn, MMP uses the midpoint of the appropriate drainage class's N rec given in Table 13 in Kentucky Extension publication AGR-1 (2010-2011). MMP determines a soil's drainage class using USDA-NRCS Soil Data Mart soils data - in a few cases, this may differ from the classes given in AGR-1. With a Beasley, Eden, Heitt, or Lowell soil, you can override the default corn N rec, increasing it by 40 to account for the difference in drainage class.

  2. For corn following grass pasture or hay, MMP assumes that the grass had been grown continuously for 5 or more years and takes a 50 pound N credit. If this is not the case (less than 5 years of grass prior to the corn), you can override the default N rec, increasing it by 25 so that only a 25 pound N credit is taken. See Table 13 in AGR-1.

  3. With tobacco, MMP uses the midpoint of the appropriate drainage class's N rec given in Table 10 in AGR-1. MMP determines a soil's drainage class using USDA-NRCS Soil Data Mart soils data -- in a few cases, this may differ from the classes given in AGR-1. With a Beasley, Eden, Heitt, or Lowell soil, you can override the default tobacco N rec, increasing it by 25 to account for the difference in drainage class.

  4. For tobacco following pasture or hay, MMP uses the Medium N Levels row in Table 10 in AGR-1 if the previous crop is grass or grass-legume with less than 80% legume stand. MMP uses the High N Levels row in Table 10 if the previous crop is legume cover crop or grass-legume with 80% or higher legume stand.

  5. For intensively managed wheat (yield of at least 70 bu), MMP uses the average of the single and split application spring N recs; for lower-yield wheat, MMP uses the midpoint of the spring N rec range. See Tables 18 and 17 in AGR-1.

  6. For a new seeding of bermuda, MMP uses an N rec of 100, which is split into two applications (at planting and around Aug. 15).

  7. For established bermuda pasture, MMP uses the midpoint of the N rec range given in Table 30 in AGR-1.

  8. For established bermuda hay N rec, MMP assumes 2 tons of yield per clipping in determining the number of clippings.

  9. With established cool-season grass hay and pasture, MMP uses an N rec of 200, which is split into three applications. See Table 27 in AGR-1.

  10. Note that for crops where the N rec is given as a range, you can override MMP's default N rec (generally the midpoint of the range) by entering a different value that is within the range given in AGR-1.

  11. If manure has been applied to a field in more than half of the previous 10 years, you can check the Manure Applied Annually box on MMP's Assessment panel to increase the amount of second-year N availability. See Table 2 in Kentucky Extension publication AGR-165.

  12. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Maine Notes

  1. Your soil test data must use the Modified Morgan nutrient extraction procedure. Do not use soil test data that was determined with some other extraction.

  2. Enter the soil test lime index value in the Buffer pH column on the Soil Tests panel.

  3. MMP can calculate CEC for you if you enter the soil test K, Mg, Ca, Soil pH, Buffer pH and Target pH data.

    For Target pH, enter 6.0, 6.5 or 7.0, or leave Target pH blank if no lime is needed -- MMP will then calculate CEC using the current soil pH as the target.

    Note that for general agronomic crops (corn silage, alfalfa, clover, grass hay, pasture), a target pH of 6.5 is typically used.

  4. For silage and haylage crops, enter yields in wet tons (65-70% moisture). For hay and pasture crops, enter yields in dry tons (10% moisture).

  5. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Maryland Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you have soil test results from a lab that's not in the list, you'll have to convert your soil test P, K, Mg and Ca data to University of Maryland FIV values. Consult with your soil test lab for assistance. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are Maryland FIV values.

  2. If you are entering soil test data from University of Maryland or University of Delaware labs, be sure to leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. These labs report data as Fertility Index Values (FIV), which are unitless.

  3. If you are entering soil test data from Agri Analysis, be sure to enter the phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and calcium values (lbs/A) and check the Levels Are In Lb/A box. Do not use the P2O5, K2O or MgO values.

  4. If you are entering soil test data from Brookside Laboratories, be sure to enter the values that are in ppm and leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. Do not use the lb/A values. If more than one phosphorus test is reported, use the "Easily Extractable" ppm of P value.

  5. MMP assumes that soil test data from Spectrum Analytic was run with Mehlich-3 but converted to and reported as Bray P1 and ammonium acetate results.

  6. The Maryland Extension N rec for wheat, barley, rye and winter oats has a range of 70-100 Lb/A. MMP uses the midpoint (85) of this range for its default N rec for these crops. If lodging is expected, you can reduce the default N rec by 20 Lb/A and enter the new rec in the crop's Custom N Rec column. Similarly, if lodging is expected with canola, you can reduce the default N rec by 50 Lb/A and enter the new rec in the crop's Custom N Rec column. In either case, be sure to document this custom N rec in the crop's Source column.

  7. With alfalfa, enter a value for the crop's Legume % Stand greater than 70 for a good stand (>4 plants per sq. ft.), 30-70 for a fair stand (1.5 to 4 plants per sq. ft.), or less than 30 for a poor stand (<1.5 plants per sq. ft.).

  8. For fert rec explanatory notes and nutrient application suggestions, refer to "Soil Fertility Management," Maryland Cooperative Extension, SFM-1, Oct. 2002.

  9. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class. The value in the KwFact column is the soil's erodibility factor. The value in the Horiz1 Dep column is the first soil horizon's depth, in centimeters.

Massachusetts Notes

  1. Massachusetts' fert recs assume that the UMass soil testing lab's modified Morgan extraction was used to determine soil test levels. If you have soil test results from another lab, you'll need to convert your soil test data to UMass modified Morgan values. Consult with your soil test lab for assistance. Note that you will need to enter P, K and Al in order for MMP to calculate P and K recs.

  2. With alfalfa, clover/trefoil and grass hay maintenance, enter the percent of the stand that is legume in the crop's Legume % Stand column.

  3. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class.

Michigan Notes

  1. Corn N recs were based on rates given in "2015 MRTN Suggested N Rates for Corn":

    http://www.soil.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/2015-MRTN-N-Rates-for-Corn.pdf

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the publication or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. Michigan's fertilizer recommendations assume that CEC is estimated by summation. If the CEC values from your soil testing lab were not estimated by summation, leave CEC blank on the Soil Tests panel and let MMP estimate CEC. Note that you must enter K, Ca, Mg and Buffer pH for MMP to be able to estimate CEC. Some labs don't report buffer pH if it is greater than 7. If this is the case with some of your buffer pH values, enter 7 for these missing buffer pH values and note this in the Notes column.

  3. Fertilizer recommendations are not available for the following crops on organic soils: sugar beet, timothy hay, corn seed, trefoil seed production, and tomatoes. In most cases, these crops are not suited for growing on organic soils.

  4. Several obsolete crops are included for backward compatibility with plans created by earlier versions of MMP. These crops are prefixed with "x" and sort to the bottom of the alphabetical crop list on the Crops panel. Do not select these crops with new plans.

  5. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Minnesota Notes

  1. Corn N recs were based on rates given in "Fertilizer Recommendations for Agronomic Crops in Minnesota" (BU-06240-S, 2011) and "Fertilizing Corn Grown on Irrigated Sandy Soils" (AG-NM-1501, 2015):

    http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/nutrient-management/nutrient-lime-guidelines

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN rate for a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use newer versions of the publications or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. If known, select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Bray P1 test was used if the field's soil pH is < 7.3 and that the Olsen test was used if soil pH is >= 7.3.

  3. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP only uses it for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan.

  4. MMP requires that nitrate soil test data (NO3-N) be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by 8 to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  5. With alfalfa, enter a value greater than 70 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are 4 or more alfalfa plants per square foot. If there are 2-3 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 30-70. If there is one or less alfalfa plant per square foot, enter a value less than 30.

  6. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Mississippi Notes

  1. Mississippi's phosphorus fertilizer recommendations assume that the Lancaster extraction was used to determine soil phosphorus.

  2. Be sure to enter CEC values that were determined by summation on the Soil Tests panel. If you enter K, Mg, Ca and Buffer pH, the CEC you enter should match MMP's Estimated CEC. If it doesn't, leave the CEC column blank and MMP will use Estimated CEC, which was determined by summation.

  3. Be sure to enter a yield goal for forage crops since MMP uses yield goal to determine many of these crops' N fertilizer recommendations.

  4. If a corn or watermelon crop will be irrigated, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel.

  5. The following crops are typically a mixture of common bermuda, bahia and dallis. The "annual leg" can be crimson clover, annual lespedeza, arrowleaf clover, ball clover, or subterranean clover. The "peren leg" can be white clover, red clover, arrowleaf clover, lespedeza, or subterranean clover.

  6. The following crops can be tall fescue or orchardgrass (northern Mississippi only). The "legume" is typically white clover, red clover, or subterranean clover.

  7. See also "Management and Timing of Application of Nutrients," USDA-NRCS Agronomy Technical Note MS-05.

  8. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class.

Missouri Notes

  1. If you don't have soil test CEC data, enter each field's Neutralizable Acidity in the Buffer pH column on the Soil Tests panel in order for MMP to calculate CEC. If a field's Neutralizable Acidity is 0, leave the Buffer pH column blank for that field.

  2. If you have salt pH data, enter it in the Soil pH column.

  3. MMP uses yield goal units of tons with pasture crops and assumes that 1 cow day = 30 pounds of forage dry matter.

  4. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

Montana Notes

  1. Montana phosphorus fertilizer recommendations assume that the Olsen P test was used.

  2. You must enter soil test nitrate data (NO3-N) for MMP to calculate MSU nitrogen fertilizer recommendations. MMP uses it for N fert recs for all years of the plan.

  3. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you have soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide the 2-foot total N value (in Lb/A) by 8 to get the appropriate value to enter (in ppm). Note that this assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  4. MSU publication EB 161 suggests increasing N recs in some cases following small grains. If small grain residue will remain on the surface and N will be broadcast applied, you can increase MMP's default N rec by 10 Lb/A for each 1000 pounds of small grain residue, up to a maximum of 40 Lb/A. Enter the adjusted N rec in the Custom N Rec column on MMP's Crops panel to override the default N rec.

  5. Oat and barley hay use the same fertilizer recommendations as oat and barley grown for grain. For hay, enter an equivalent yield in bushels of grain.

  6. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Perm column is the soil's permeability class.

Nebraska Notes

  1. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP only uses it for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan. For subsequent years (or in the first year if no soil nitrate value is entered for a field), MMP uses an assumed nitrate concentration for the crop's suggested sampling depth, as follows:

  2. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you have soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by the indicated multiplier above to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to the suggested depth.

  3. If known, select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Bray P1 test was used if the field's soil pH is < 7.3 and that the Olsen test was used if soil pH is >= 7.3.

  4. For corn N recs, MMP assumes a 10:1 corn:N price ratio and spring pre-plant application timing in determining adjustment factors.

  5. For wheat N recs, MMP assumes a 0.1 N:wheat price ratio. For wheat P recs, MMP assumes a 0.1 P:wheat price ratio in calculating the broadcast P rec.

  6. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

  7. MMP's P and K recs for most Nebraska crops are for broadcast applications. With corn, the P rec for banding preplant or beside the row at planting is half of MMP's broadcast P rec. With millet, the P rec assumes that the phosphorus will be banded.

  8. With alfalfa, enter a value in the range 70-100 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are more than 4 alfalfa plants per square foot. Enter a value in the range 30-69 if there are 1.5 to 4 alfalfa plants per square foot. Enter a value in the range 0-29 if there are less than 1.5 alfalfa plants per square foot.

  9. With irrigated grass and pasture, enter a value of 50 or higher for the crop's Legume % Stand to obtain the P and K rec for grass-legume; if no value is entered or the value is less than 50, MMP returns the P and K rec for grass.

  10. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Nevada Notes

  1. MMP requires soil test nitrate data (NO3-N) to calculate crop N fertilizer recommendations. MMP uses it for all years of the plan.

  2. MMP assumes that soil was sampled to a depth of 12" for NO3-N.

  3. Hay and pasture yields should be entered as tons of dry material. Yields for silage should be entered as tons of wet material. Vegetable crop yields should be entered in the indicated units and assume fresh yields in most cases. Note that these crops do assume dry yields: red chile, pinto beans, dry peas.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HzKsat column is the soil's saturated hydraulic conductivity data, where each pair of numbers (separated by a comma) consists of a horizon's depth (in centimeters) and the horizon's ksat (in um/sec).

New Hampshire Notes

  1. In calculating P and K recommendations, MMP assumes 1.5 tons per cutting with alfalfa, alfalfa grass, clover grass and grass hay.

  2. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class.

New Jersey Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you have soil test results from a lab that's not in the list, you'll have to convert your soil test P, K, Mg and Ca data to Mehlich-3 values. Consult with your soil test lab for assistance. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are Mehlich-3 values.

  2. If you are entering soil test data from A&L Eastern Laboratories, be sure to obtain Mehlich-3 results from the lab.

  3. If you are entering soil test data from Agri Analysis, be sure to enter the phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and calcium values (lbs/A) and check the Levels Are In Lb/A box. Do not use the P2O5, K2O or MgO values.

  4. If you are entering soil test data from Brookside Laboratories, be sure to enter the values that are in ppm and leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. Do not use the lb/A values. If more than one phosphorus test is reported, use the "Easily Extractable" ppm of P value.

  5. If you are entering soil test data from Spectrum Analytic, be sure to obtain Mehlich-3 results from the lab. Spectrum runs Mehlich-3 but normally converts to and reports Bray P1 and ammonium acetate results.

  6. Be sure to enter the percent legume stand for alfalfa, clover and trefoil. MMP uses this to determine the correct legume N credit if a corn or corn silage crop will be grown in the following year.

  7. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

New Mexico Notes

  1. MMP requires soil test nitrate data (NO3-N) to calculate crop N fertilizer recommendations. MMP uses it for all years of the plan.

  2. MMP assumes that soil was sampled to a depth of 12" for NO3-N.

  3. Hay and pasture yields should be entered as tons of dry material. Yields for silage should be entered as tons of wet material. Vegetable crop yields should be entered in the indicated units and assume fresh yields in most cases. Note that these crops do assume dry yields: red chile, pinto beans, dry peas.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HzKsat column is the soil's saturated hydraulic conductivity data, where each pair of numbers (separated by a comma) consists of a horizon's depth (in centimeters) and the horizon's ksat (in um/sec).

New York Notes

  1. Select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Cornell Morgan test was used. Non-Cornell lab results are converted to Cornell Morgan using the equations given in this spreadsheet:

    http://nmsp.cals.cornell.edu/software/Morganequiv7.xls

    With non-Cornell labs, be sure to enter Ca, Al and Soil pH results too.

  2. If a field is artificially drained, be sure to select the type of drainage on the Assessment panel. In determining corn, millet, sorghum, sudangrass and sunflower N recs, MMP assumes that patterned tile drainage is excellent, random tile drainage is adequate, and other types of drainage are inadequate.

  3. With no-till crop production, increase the default N rec by 20 Lb/A for corn, millet, sorghum, sudangrass and sunflower. Enter the higher rec in the Custom N Rec column.

North Dakota Notes

  1. Corn N recs given in MMP represent the N rate using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10 with an N price of $0.40/lb and a corn price of $4.00/bu.

    Sunflower N recs given in MMP represent the N rate for a nitrogen price of $0.40/lb and a sunflower price of $0.15/lb.

    Wheat N recs given in MMP represent the N rate using a nitrogen to wheat price ratio of 0.10 with an N price of $0.40/lb and a wheat price of $4.00/bu.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

    Note that you'll need to override MMP's default N recs with no-till corn and no-till sunflower since tillage is not an MMP input.

  2. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP only uses it for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan. For subsequent years (or if no soil nitrate value is entered for a field), MMP assumes a 40 Lb/A nitrate credit.

  3. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by 8 to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  4. If known, select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Olsen test was used.

    Note that the Bray P1 test is not supported for corn, rye or wheat.

  5. With alfalfa, enter a value greater than 70 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are more than 4 alfalfa plants per square foot. If there are 3-4 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 51-70. If there are 1-2 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 30-50. If there is less than 1 alfalfa plant per square foot, enter a value less than 30.

Ohio Notes

  1. Corn N recs were determined by version 1.8 of the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/nRate.aspx

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the calculator or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. The Tri-State fertilizer recommendations used in Ohio and Indiana assume that CEC is estimated by summation. If the CEC values from your soil testing lab were not estimated by summation, leave CEC blank on the Soil Tests panel and let MMP estimate CEC. Note that you must enter K, Ca, Mg and Buffer pH for MMP to be able to estimate CEC. Some labs don't report buffer pH if it is greater than 7. If this is the case with some of your buffer pH values, enter 7 for these missing buffer pH values and note this in the Notes column.

  3. Ohio rate choices in the Manure Application Rate Calculator:

    Available N in storage: With this rate choice, MMP calculates a rate that meets the 1-year crop N need. With non-legumes, this is the crop N fertilizer recommendation on the Crops panel. With legumes, the rate supplies 150 Lb/A available N. Available N is determined by the maximum N available from the manure in the first year following application. No post-application losses are taken into account. If you entered a manure lab analysis on the Analysis panel, MMP uses the value in the Meas. Max. Avail. N column. If you did not enter a lab analysis, MMP uses the value in the Est. Max. Avail. N column. This rate choice is intended for June through September applications on high N leaching fields with a growing or cover crop and October through March applications on high N leaching fields.

    50 Lb/A stor avail N: With this rate choice, MMP calculates a rate that supplies 50 Lb/A of available N, as determined above. This rate choice is intended for June through September applications on high N leaching fields with no growing crop.

    Avail N after app losses: With this rate choice, MMP determines available N as above, but takes into account expected short-term application losses due to volatilization of ammonium N. This rate choice is intended for June through March applications on low or medium N leaching fields.

    Available N after all losses: With this rate choice, MMP determines available N as above, but takes into account all expected losses due to application method and timing. This rate choice is intended for April and May applications only.

    1-year crop P needs: With this rate choice, MMP calculates a rate that supplies the 1-year crop P2O5 need, not to exceed the 1-year crop N rate as determined above (after application losses). P need is the greater of the crop's P2O5 fertilizer recommendation or the amount of P2O5 removed from the field in the harvested portion of the crop.

    Multi-year crop P needs: With these rate choices, MMP looks at the planned crop rotation in determining multi-year P needs and assumes no additional manure will be applied for the indicated number of years.

    Refer to the current Ohio USDA-NRCS Field Office Technical Guide (FOTG) nutrient management standard (590) for additional application rate guidelines.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Oklahoma Notes

  1. If you are entering soil test data from the OSU Soil, Water, and Forage Analytical Laboratory, be sure to check the Levels Are In Lb/A box on the Soil Tests panel.

  2. MMP requires that nitrate soil test data (NO3-N) be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values from the OSU lab that are in Lb/A, divide each nitrate value by 2 to get the value to enter in ppm (assumes a 6" sampling depth). These values will only be used for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan. If no soil nitrate value is entered for a field, MMP assumes 0 nitrate credit.

  3. OSU publication F-2225 suggests increasing the N rec for small grains that are also grazed by 30 Lb/A per 100 pounds of beef weight gain or 1000 pounds of forage grazed per acre. Enter the adjusted N rec in the Custom N Rec column on MMP's Crops panel to override MMP's default N rec.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the TFact column is the soil tolerable loss factor, in tons/acre/year.

Oregon Notes

  1. MMP assumes the Bray P1 soil test is used in counties west of the Cascades and the Olsen P soil test is used in counties east of the Cascades. If you leave the P Test Used column blank on the Soil Tests panel, MMP assumes that the field's soil test P level was determined by the appropriate P test for the operation's county. If you select the wrong P test for the county's region, or if no fertilizer recommendations are available for the county's region, the default fertilizer recommendations on the Crops panel will be blank.

  2. For soil test P and K, enter your levels as ppm for a 12" sample depth.

  3. For pastures on dairies west of the Cascades, select the appropriate forage crop (tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, annual ryegrass). The pasture crops listed are for beef and sheep.

  4. Enter corn silage yields as wet tons at 65% moisture. Enter oat haylage yields as wet tons at 60% moisture. Enter yields for hay and pasture crops as tons of dry matter. See the Crops panel help for tips on converting yields to a specific moisture content. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication EM8585 for typical forage yields.

  5. Fertilizer recommendations for corn west of the Cascades assume 20,000 plants/acre. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication FG10 for adjusting fertilizer recommendations for different populations. Fertilizer recommendations for corn east of the Cascades assume 25,000 to 30,000 plants/acre and yields of at least 150 bushels per acre. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication FG71 for adjusting fertilizer recommendations for different populations or yield goals.

  6. MMP requires nitrate soil test data for calculating N recommendations for many crops east of the Cascades. Enter the average ppm of nitrates for the assumed sample depth (see below). If your nitrate soil test data is in Lb/A of nitrates, divide the value by the indicated divisor to get the equivalent ppm. If you have ppm values for more than one depth, average them using MMP's Soil Test Nitrate Calculator.

  7. With spring-planted small grains on muck and peat soils east of the Cascades, be sure to enter the soil test organic matter percent.

  8. With grass pastures east of the Cascades, you can increase the N rec for lower altitude, longer growing season areas. Enter the higher N rec in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel. See Oregon State Extension publication FG21 for more information.

  9. With established tall fescue seed and perennial ryegrass seed, MMP's K recs assume that straw is baled and removed. If straw is burned or chopped, you can decrease the K2O rec by 25 to 50 Lb/A. Enter the lower K2O rec in the Custom K2O Rec column on the Crops panel.

  10. With onions, MMP's P recs assume 0% soil lime concentration and not fumigated before planting. You can increase the P rec by 8 Lb/A for each percent of free lime. You can also increase the P rec by 40 Lb/A if fumigated before planting. Enter the higher P rec in the Custom P2O5 Rec column on the Crops panel. See publication PNW546 for more information.

  11. No fert recs are available for sugar beets or dry edible beans. With these crops, enter your own recs in the Custom Rec columns on the Crops panel.

  12. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

  13. P fertilizer recommendations for most crops assume a banded application. Refer to the fertilizer recommendation's source publication for any increases to make if the P fertilizer will be broadcast.

  14. If a field has been manured annually for 4 or more years, be sure to check the Manure Applied Annually box on the Assessment panel. If the field has not been manured annually for 4 or more years, leave this box unchecked.

  15. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Pennsylvania Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you have soil test results from a lab that's not in the list, you'll have to convert your soil test P, K, Mg and Ca data to Mehlich-3 values. Consult with your soil test lab for assistance. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are Mehlich-3 values.

  2. If you are entering soil test data from A&L Eastern Laboratories, be sure to obtain Mehlich-3 results from the lab.

  3. If you are entering soil test data from Agri Analysis, be sure to enter the phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, and calcium values (lbs/A) and check the Levels Are In Lb/A box. Do not use the P2O5, K2O or MgO values.

  4. If you are entering soil test data from Brookside Laboratories, be sure to enter the values that are in ppm and leave the Levels Are In Lb/A box unchecked. Do not use the lb/A values. If more than one phosphorus test is reported, use the "Easily Extractable" ppm of P value.

  5. If you are entering soil test data from Spectrum Analytic, be sure to obtain Mehlich-3 results from the lab. Spectrum runs Mehlich-3 but normally converts to and reports Bray P1 and ammonium acetate results.

  6. Be sure to enter the percent legume stand for alfalfa, clover and trefoil. MMP uses this to determine the correct legume N credit if a corn or corn silage crop will be grown in the following year.

  7. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class.

Rhode Island Notes

  1. Rhode Island uses Massachusetts' fertilizer recommendations. Massachusetts' fert recs assume that the UMass soil testing lab's modified Morgan extraction was used to determine soil test levels. If you have soil test results from another lab, you'll need to convert your soil test data to UMass modified Morgan values. Consult with your soil test lab for assistance. Note that you will need to enter P, K and Al in order for MMP to calculate P and K recs.

  2. With alfalfa, clover/trefoil and grass hay maintenance, enter the percent of the stand that is legume in the crop's Legume % Stand column.

  3. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class.

South Carolina Notes

  1. With irrigated corn, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland corn, leave this box unchecked.

  2. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the Perm column is the soil's permeability class.

    The value in the Soil Group column is the soil's soil group used in generating fertilizer recommendations. For more information, see pages 1-3 in EC 476, "Nutrient Management for South Carolina," Clemson University.


South Dakota Notes

  1. If known, select the test that was used to determine the soil phosphorus level in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave this column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the Olsen test was used.

  2. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP only uses it for N fertilizer recommendations in the first year of the plan. For subsequent years (or if no soil nitrate value is entered for a field), MMP assumes a 40 Lb/A nitrate credit following a crop or 75 Lb/A following fallow.

  3. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by 8 to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  4. Increase the default N rec by 30 Lb/A if no-till or strip-till is used.

    To override MMP's default N rec, enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  5. With alfalfa, enter a value greater than 70 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are more than 4 alfalfa plants per square foot. If there are 3-4 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 51-70. If there are 1-2 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 30-50. If there is less than 1 alfalfa plant per square foot, enter a value less than 30.

Tennessee Notes

  1. In calculating N recommendations, MMP assumes 2 tons per cutting with bermuda hybrid hay, timothy and orchardgrass. MMP also assumes there will be a second cutting if the yield goal is greater than 2 tons/acre with grass-clover hay or greater than 3 tons/acre with grass hay.

  2. For alfalfa, enter a value in the range 70-100 for the crop's Legume % Stand if there are more than 4 alfalfa plants per square foot. If there are 1.5 to 4 alfalfa plants per square foot, enter a value in the range 30-70 for Legume % Stand.

  3. MMP's fert recs for grass-clover pasture, grass-clover hay, and grass hay (maintenance recs only) assume no fall stockpiling of fescue. For fall stockpiling of fescue, increase the N fert rec by 60 Lb (15 Lb with grass pasture) and enter the new rec in the crop's Custom N Rec column.

  4. For pasture and hayland renovation, select an establishment (new) crop.

  5. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Utah Notes

  1. If soil test nitrate data is entered (NO3-N), MMP uses it for N fertilizer recommendations for all years of the plan. If no soil nitrate value is entered for a field, MMP assumes 0 nitrate credit.

  2. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm. If you are entering soil nitrate values that are in Lb/A, divide each value by 3.5 to get the appropriate value in ppm. This assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 12".

  3. With irrigated wheat crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland wheat, leave this box unchecked.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HWT column is the soil's high water table depth, in centimeters. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the AWC column is the soil's available water capacity in top 5 feet of soil or to depth of restriction layer, whichever is less (in inches).

Vermont Notes

  1. Vermont Extension fertilizer recommendations assume that the Modified Morgan extraction was used to determine soil test levels. If you have Modified Morgan soil test results from A&L Eastern Laboratories or Spectrum Analytic, be sure to obtain the aluminum soil test results from the lab. You must enter the Al soil test value to get a P2O5 fert rec.

  2. Silage and haylage yields should be entered as wet weights (65% moisture). This includes corn silage, small grain silage, forage sorghum, and sorghum/sudangrass. Hay and pasture yields should be entered as dry weights (one ton dry hay = 2.5 tons haylage).

  3. For typical manure analyses, refer to Table 14 in "Nutrient Recommendations for Field Crops in Vermont," University of Vermont Extension, Br. 1390, March 2004.

  4. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

Virginia Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are Virginia Tech Mehlich-1.

  2. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

    The value in the Mgmt Group column is the soil's management group (A through QQ).

    The value in the Corn Prod. column is the soil's corn productivity (Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, IVb, V).

    The value in the Sorghum Prod. column is the soil's sorghum productivity (Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, IVb, V).

    The value in the Alfalfa Prod. column is the soil's alfalfa productivity (I, II, III, NS).

    The value in the GHP Prod. column is the soil's tall-grass hay/pasture productivity (I, II, III, IV, NS).


Washington Notes

  1. MMP assumes the Bray P1 soil test is used in counties west of the Cascades and the Olsen P soil test is used in counties east of the Cascades. If you leave the P Test Used column blank on the Soil Tests panel, MMP assumes that the field's soil test P level was determined by the appropriate P test for the operation's county. If you select the wrong P test for the county's region, or if no fertilizer recommendations are available for the county's region, the default fertilizer recommendations on the Crops panel will be blank.

  2. For soil test P and K, enter your levels as ppm for a 12" sample depth.

  3. For pastures on dairies west of the Cascades, select the appropriate forage crop (tall fescue, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, annual ryegrass). The pasture crops listed are for beef and sheep.

  4. Enter corn silage yields as wet tons at 65% moisture. Enter oat haylage yields as wet tons at 60% moisture. Enter yields for hay and pasture crops as tons of dry matter. See the Crops panel help for tips on converting yields to a specific moisture content. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication EM8585 for typical forage yields.

  5. Fertilizer recommendations for corn west of the Cascades assume 20,000 plants/acre. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication FG10 for adjusting fertilizer recommendations for different populations. Fertilizer recommendations for corn east of the Cascades assume 25,000 to 30,000 plants/acre and yields of at least 150 bushels per acre. Refer to Oregon State Extension publication FG71 for adjusting fertilizer recommendations for different populations or yield goals.

  6. MMP requires nitrate soil test data for calculating N recommendations for many crops east of the Cascades. Enter the average ppm of nitrates for the assumed sample depth (see below). If your nitrate soil test data is in Lb/A of nitrates, divide the value by the indicated divisor to get the equivalent ppm. If you have ppm values for more than one depth, average them using MMP's Soil Test Nitrate Calculator.

  7. With spring-planted small grains on muck and peat soils east of the Cascades, be sure to enter the soil test organic matter percent.

  8. With grass pastures east of the Cascades, you can increase the N rec for lower altitude, longer growing season areas. Enter the higher N rec in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel. See Oregon State Extension publication FG21 for more information.

  9. With established tall fescue seed and perennial ryegrass seed, MMP's K recs assume that straw is baled and removed. If straw is burned or chopped, you can decrease the K2O rec by 25 to 50 Lb/A. Enter the lower K2O rec in the Custom K2O Rec column on the Crops panel.

  10. With onions, MMP's P recs assume 0% soil lime concentration and not fumigated before planting. You can increase the P rec by 8 Lb/A for each percent of free lime. You can also increase the P rec by 40 Lb/A if fumigated before planting. Enter the higher P rec in the Custom P2O5 Rec column on the Crops panel. See publication PNW546 for more information.

  11. No fert recs are available for sugar beets or dry edible beans. With these crops, enter your own recs in the Custom Rec columns on the Crops panel.

  12. With irrigated crops, be sure to check the field's Irrigated With Water box on the Fields panel; for dryland crops, leave this box unchecked.

  13. P fertilizer recommendations for most crops assume a banded application. Refer to the fertilizer recommendation's source publication for any increases to make if the P fertilizer will be broadcast.

  14. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

West Virginia Notes

  1. Select the appropriate soil testing lab in the P Test Used column on the Soil Tests panel. If you leave the P Test Used column blank for a field, MMP assumes that the soil test data are West Virginia University Mehlich-1.

  2. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

    The value in the Mgmt Group column is the soil's management group (A through QQ).

    The value in the Corn Prod. column is the soil's corn productivity (Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, IVb, V).

    The value in the Sorghum Prod. column is the soil's sorghum productivity (Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVa, IVb, V).

    The value in the Alfalfa Prod. column is the soil's alfalfa productivity (I, II, III, NS).

    The value in the GHP Prod. column is the soil's tall-grass hay/pasture productivity (I, II, III, IV, NS).

    The value in the Sensitivity column is the soil's environmental sensitivity rating (Low, Moderate, High).

    Soils with a Moderate or High Sensitivity rating will have a value in the Limitation column which indicates the limitation (leaching, shallow, drainage, wetness) that resulted in that rating.


Wisconsin Notes

  1. Corn N recs were determined by version 1.8 of the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator:

    http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/nRate.aspx

    Values given in MMP represent the MRTN N rate using a nitrogen to corn price ratio of 0.10.

    To override MMP's default N rec (for example, to use a newer version of the calculator or a different price ratio), enter the override value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel and document the value in the Source Of Custom Fertilizer Recommendation column.

  2. With alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil, enter a value for the crop's Legume % Stand greater than 70 for a good stand, 30-70 for a fair stand, or less than 30 for a poor stand.

  3. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group. The value in the Subsoil Fertility column is the soil's subsoil fertility group for use in the Wisconsin Phosphorus Index. The value in the Soil Yld Pot. column is the soil's corn yield potential. The value in the Soil Group column is the soil's group. These latter two values are used in generating Wisconsin Extension fertilizer recommendations.

    The possible values for Subsoil Fertility are as follows:

    The possible values for Soil Yld Pot. are as follows:

    The possible values for Soil Group are as follows:


Wyoming Notes

  1. Wyoming phosphorus fertilizer recommendations assume that the Olsen P test was used.

  2. You must enter soil test nitrate data (NO3-N) for MMP to calculate nitrogen fertilizer recommendations. MMP uses it for N fert recs for all years of the plan.

  3. MMP requires that nitrate (NO3-N) soil test data be entered in units of ppm and assumes the soil was sampled to a depth of 24".

  4. If you leave soil test Lime blank, MMP assumes the soil is not a high lime soil.

  5. For barley, corn grain, corn silage, millet, oats, potato, safflower, sorghum-sudan, sugar beet, sunflower and wheat grown above 6,000 feet, reduce the default N rec by OM x 20 and enter the reduced value in the Custom N Rec column on the Crops panel.

  6. For grass/legume, be sure to enter the percent of the stand that is legume on the Crops panel.

  7. Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class. The value in the Perm column is the soil's permeability class.

Soil Drainage Class

Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Drainage column is the soil's drainage class.

The possible values for Drainage are as follows:


Soil Annual Flooding Frequency Class

Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Annual Flooding column is the soil's annual flooding frequency class.

The possible values for Annual Flooding are as follows:


Soil Hydrologic Group

Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the HydGrp column is the soil's hydrologic group.

The possible values for HydGrp are as follows:


Runoff Potential Class

Clicking the Soil Info button on the Fields panel generates the Information About Soils report for the counties selected in the plan. The value in the Runoff column is the soil's runoff potential class.

The possible values for Runoff are as follows:


Last updated: May 2, 2017

Copyright © 1998-2017 Purdue Research Foundation.