Download PDF versionChapter 1 — Meeting Criterion 1 with Purpose: Mission and Integrity

Statement of Criterion: The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students.

Introduction

Since the last accreditation site visit in 1999, Purdue has engaged in strategic planning, resulting in Board of Trustees' approval of two strategic plans: The Next Level: Preeminence, which spanned 2001–2007, and New Synergies, covering 2008–2014. Each of these plans was developed with input from Purdue's many constituencies, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, state and local officials, community leaders, and members of the general public. Each strategic plan sets forth the mission, vision, and goals for Purdue during the plan periods. Academic and administrative structures and resources continue to be realigned to support Purdue's vision and mission, and the goals of its strategic plan.

Purdue's tradition of ethical conduct spans its entire history. As noted in its New Synergies strategic plan, and in its "Statement of Integrity" [1], adopted in 2003: "integrity is indispensable to our mission. We act with honesty and adhere to the highest standards of moral and ethical values and principles through our personal and professional behavior, in every action and decision." Since the last accreditation, Purdue has revised its Student Conduct Code [2] and Policy on Research Misconduct [3], with input from faculty, staff, and students.

Purdue also recognizes its responsibility to provide leadership ensuring that equal access and equal opportunity in employment and education, and respect for diversity, are norms rather than aspirations. In keeping with this principle, the University has established policies stating: "Purdue University is committed to maintaining a community which recognizes and values the inherent worth and dignity of every person; fosters tolerance, sensitivity, understanding, and mutual respect among its members; and encourages each individual to strive to reach his or her own potential. In pursuit of its goal of academic excellence, the University seeks to develop and nurture diversity. The University believes that diversity among its many members strengthens the institution, stimulates creativity, promotes the exchange of ideas, and enriches campus life" [4].

To measure and monitor progress in accomplishing its mission and fulfilling its commitments to integrity and diversity, Purdue's administration provides the Board of Trustees with annual governance reports on topics including student success, budgeting, sponsored research, and diversity. Annual reports on Purdue's progress in meeting strategic plan goals and objectives have also been provided to the board. These reports have been posted on Purdue's Web site and are widely distributed to its stakeholders.

back to top

Core Component 1a. The organization's mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization's commitments.

Purdue's mission has been embraced by its Board of Trustees and other constituents; it properly defines these constituents; it includes commitments to excellence and integrity in learning, discovery, and engagement; it is periodically evaluated; and it is communicated in a variety of ways most convenient to those groups to whom it applies.
When the Indiana General Assembly accepted the terms of the Morrill Act, Purdue's mission was established. Under this Act, the state received funding for:

"…the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and mechanic arts … in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life."

Purdue's mission was expanded by the Indiana legislature when it accepted the terms of the Federal Hatch Act in 1889, establishing the Agricultural Experiment Station, and again in 1915, with the acceptance of the terms of the Smith Lever Act establishing the Cooperative Extension Service. Past and present Purdue mission statements consistently emphasize the areas of teaching, research, and service. Since 2001, Purdue has used the terms learning, discovery, and engagement to describe these three essential activities. The strategic plans of many academic departments and each college at Purdue include mission statements, as do the strategic plans of other major offices and programs. Examples of individual college strategic plans are available in the resource room.

The Faculty and Staff Handbook [5], which is updated annually and distributed to all faculty and staff, describes the University's mission:

"As a land grant institution, we demonstrate our responsiveness to our constituencies and extend to them access to our knowledge resources. …We integrate our mission with our responsibilities. …Our responsibilities and obligations toward the advancement of learning, discovery, and engagement in the University and in Indiana extend to our nation and the world."

By developing a new strategic plan every five to seven years, Purdue reviews its mission, vision, and values, and revises the goals to remain consistent with the mission. In ratifying each strategic plan, the Board of Trustees adopts the statements of vision and values that define Purdue's mission. These statements — and other official documents stating Purdue's mission, vision, values, and goals — define the varied internal and external constituencies that Purdue strives to serve. These documents also speak to the University's strong commitment to high academic standards and its focus on excellence in higher learning.

back to top

The Mission and Vision of Purdue University

The 2001–2007 Strategic Plan: The Next Level: Preeminence [6]

The mission of Purdue University is to serve the citizens of Indiana, the United States, and the world through discovery that expands the realm of knowledge, learning through dissemination and preservation of knowledge, and engagement through exchange of knowledge.

The plan's vision for preeminence, and the attributes it aspired to, are summarized in Figure 1-1.

Figure 1-1. Plan Concept, 2001-2007 Strategic Plan

Figure 1-1. Plan Concept, 2001-2007 Strategic Plan

Source: Purdue University 2001-2007 Strategic Plan

Click to open image in a new window.

The 2008–2014 Strategic Plan: New Synergies [7]

Purdue's current strategic plan builds upon all that has previously been accomplished and remains continuously focused on its three-part mission:

"Purdue University serves diverse populations of Indiana, the nation, and the world through discovery that expands the frontiers of knowledge, learning that nurtures the sharing of knowledge, and engagement that promotes the application of knowledge."

In recognition that current challenges require not only technical solutions from the sciences and engineering but also social awareness and cultural competencies fostered in the liberal arts, "synergy" quickly became the hallmark of the strategic plan. This plan, and its three primary goals of discovery with delivery, meeting global challenges, and launching tomorrow's leaders, is depicted in Figure 1-2.

Figure 1-2. Plan Concept, 2008-2014 Strategic Plan

Figure 1-2. Plan Concept, 2008-2014 Strategic Plan

Source: Purdue University 2008-2014 Strategic Plan: New Synergies, June 2008

Click to open image in a new window.

back to top

Values and Culture

As a land grant institution, Purdue is part of a distinguished tradition of democracy, inclusiveness, and accessibility in higher education. As it makes advanced education available to qualified students, Purdue demonstrates its concern for the intellectual and personal growth of every individual.

All members of the University community are valued for who they are and what they contribute. Purdue's celebration of its members' diverse backgrounds, cultures, and viewpoints cultivates mutual respect in all interactions. The University's community extends far beyond the physical limits of the campus and encompasses populations far greater than its students, faculty, and staff. In its teaching, learning, scholarship, research, creative endeavor, and widespread outreach and engagement, Purdue serves the state of Indiana, the nation, and the entire global community.

As a great academic institution, Purdue pursues excellence in all its endeavors. Because it is open to change, it encourages constant improvement. Purdue envisions itself as a university dedicated to cultivation and enrichment of the mind. It is an open, democratic, and civil community of scholars engaged in free and untrammeled inquiry. The University values learning as a way of life and promotes the habits of critical thinking and intellectual curiosity. It offers students access to cutting-edge learning experiences, facilities, and materials; to a faculty that vigorously pursues research and scholarship; and to academic guidance sensitive to their interests, needs, and abilities.

Purdue's faculty and its collaborative relationships, both within and outside the University, have a global impact in discovery and application of new knowledge. The University recognizes that all its academic efforts require intellectual freedom and a climate that encourages free and open exchange of ideas.

As a social institution, Purdue insists that its members act with honesty and integrity and adhere to the highest standards of personal and professional behavior. The University is pledged to use its financial, physical, and human resources wisely and prudently to improve the University, its community, and the world. Documents that overview Purdue's mission and commitment to integrity are readily available to all faculty, staff, and students online and in printed document form. The pervasive availability of these documents helps ensure that Purdue faculty, staff, and students continue to focus on integrity and the University's mission.

Perhaps the process by which the current strategic plan was developed says more about how the mission pervades the organization than does the plan itself. The new strategic plan was developed in a "bottom up" fashion. Teams of faculty, staff, and students were constituted to work on specific issues. They held open forums to generate ideas and to obtain feedback on the ideas being put forward. It was a highly inclusive process that invited input and discussion at every level.

back to top

Core Component 1b. In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves.

In pursuit of its goal of academic excellence, Purdue seeks to develop and nurture diversity, which is defined as, "equality and inclusion for all people–men and women of diverse races, ethnicities, religions, national origins, sexual orientation, abilities and skills, knowledge and ideas, socio-economic levels, life experiences, and perspectives that interact with the global community" [8].

The University communicates its vision for diversity through numerous policies and documents, including:

  • Strategic Plan 2008–2014: New Synergies [7];
  • Toward a Mosaic for Educational Equity: A Purdue Vision and Action Plan [8];
  • University Regulations 2009–2010, An Online Reference for Students, Staff, and Faculty [9];
  • Faculty and Staff Online Handbook [5];
  • Nondiscrimination Policy Statement [4]; and
  • Antiharassment Policy [10].

To successfully prepare students for life and work in a changing culture, the University actively fosters diversity. The diverse academic community at Purdue is united in pursuing excellence in learning, discovery, and engagement; preeminence in global education; hope, consciousness, and commitment; and fairness, justice, equality, and removal of barriers [8]. Purdue is part of a distinguished tradition of democracy, inclusiveness, and accessibility in higher education. As stated in the 2008–2014 strategic plan, excellence cannot be achieved without an educational environment that is immersed in a diverse yet cohesive academic community where faculty, students, and professional staff engage in a rich mix of human and intellectual activities [7].

The University believes that diversity among its members strengthens the institution, stimulates creativity, promotes the exchange of ideas, and enriches campus life [9]. The promotion of human and intellectual diversity is encouraged by providing equal access and opportunity to representatives of an extensive variety of populations and cultures. The 2008–2014 strategic plan states that all members of the University community are valued for who they are and what they contribute [7]. Purdue views all persons involved in any University-related activity solely as individuals on the basis of their own personal abilities, qualifications, and other relevant characteristics, as articulated in the Faculty and Staff Handbook [5].

Through its "Statement of Principles and Values," the University declares its commitment to maintaining an inclusive community that recognizes and values the inherent worth and dignity of every person; fosters tolerance, sensitivity, understanding, and mutual respect among its members; and encourages each individual to strive to reach his or her own potential [9]. Purdue does not condone and will not tolerate any type or form of discrimination or harassment against any member of the University community [4, 9, 10]. All educational services and programs of the University are to be available and open to all academically qualified individuals without any discrimination on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry, marital status, parental status, sexual orientation, disability, or status as a veteran [4]. All aspects of the employment relationship — including recruitment, selection, hiring, training, professional development, tenure, promotion, compensation, and separations — are administered in accordance with the equal access and equal employment opportunity policy [5].

In the 2008–2014 New Synergies strategic plan, the diversity of learners, other constituencies, and the greater society served by Purdue are clearly recognized. A vice provost for diversity and inclusion position was created as part of New Synergies, ensuring a continued focus on the University's goals. The position provides strategic leadership and vision around Purdue's efforts to foster a climate that embraces and promotes diversity. As chief diversity officer, the vice provost for diversity and inclusion reports to the provost, serves as a member of the president's cabinet, and works closely with the vice president for ethics and compliance, who serves as the University's equal opportunity and Title IX officer. The Office of the Vice President for Ethics and Compliance (formerly, Human Relations) was expanded in 2008 to help Purdue fulfill its commitment to the highest standards of ethics and integrity. A new vice president for human resources position is anticipated in 2010.

As shown in Figure 1-3, accountability for diversity, equal access, and equal opportunity originates with the University president. This administrative structure, with clearly defined responsibilities for those holding leadership positions, ensures continuation of uniform and consistent application of policies and procedures addressing academic dishonesty, responding to grievances in a timely and equitable manner, and protecting the rights of all members of the University community, as dictated by federal and state laws and Purdue's principles of integrity.

All University members are considered responsible and accountable for promoting an atmosphere that embraces the intersections of cultures and global perspectives at Purdue [8]. Annual reports addressing diversity are delivered to the Board of Trustees as a part of the Governance Report Series [11].

Figure 1-3. Organizational Strategy to Address Diversity at Purdue University

Figure 1-3. Organizational Strategy to Address Diversity at Purdue University

Source: Office of the President

back to top

Core Component 1c. Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.

With the implementation of strategic planning, awareness of Purdue's mission has permeated all levels of the University, and with this heightened awareness has come increased support for its mission. Commitment to outreach and engagement were renewed at the University level with the creation of a vice provost for engagement position in 2001.

Purdue departments and programs are continually engaged in activities supporting the University's stated mission and communicating the mission to its various constituencies. In addition to those found throughout this self-study document, notable examples follow.

Departments within the College of Agriculture undergo a comprehensive review every five years. As part of the review, a department prepares a self-study report that is provided to the review team and others. The Department of Food Science was reviewed in the spring of 2008. Its self-study report [12] includes "Discovery, Learning, and Engagement" on the front cover and provides extensive sections focusing on accomplishments in each of these areas.

Building upon a long tradition of engagement through activities such as the Literary Awards, now in its 77th year, along with Books and Coffee discussion groups, the Department of English is actively involved in several forms of engagement. Many faculty members participate in the College of Liberal Arts PLACE (Purdue Liberal Arts Community Engagement) program [13], giving lectures and readings throughout the state. In 2007 department faculty joined with Purdue's Oncological Sciences Center for the Cancer Culture and Community Program, which included discussions, symposia, and readings by visiting writers. Through activities such as "Words on the Go," a program that puts poetry on Greater Lafayette Public Transportation Corporation buses, and service learning activities involving introductory composition and professional writing students, the department promotes community engagement.

Since Purdue's last accreditation, the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences has created a new Doctor of Audiology (AuD) degree program [14]. This program is an exemplar of the integration of the University's discovery, learning, and engagement missions. Conducted jointly with the Indiana University School of Medicine's Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, it produces both clinical practitioners engaging in service to the community and researchers at the forefront of discovery. Students in this program do regular service learning/engagement via the delivery of clinical services in a variety of audiology clinics, both on and off campus, and are involved in research with the potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of an array of auditory processing disorders.

Purdue Engineering logoThe new College of Engineering logo [15] consists of three stylized triangles reaching upward, indicating dynamic movement into the future and reflecting the three-part mission of learning, discovery, and engagement, derived from the strategic plan.

These are a few examples of how the colleges, schools, and academic departments integrate the University's mission into their own plans and aspirations. Purdue's constituents are strong supporters of the University's strategic plans, which have the missions of learning, discovery, and engagement as their foundation.

back to top

Core Component 1d. The organization's governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission.

University Governance and Administrative Structures

To accomplish its mission, the University has created a system of shared governance in which administration, faculty, staff, and students all serve important roles in directing its operations. This model of shared governance continues to work well for Purdue.

Indiana Commission for Higher Education

The Indiana Commission for Higher Education [ICHE], a fourteen-member, statewide group, appointed by the governor, coordinates publicly-supported higher education in the state of Indiana [16]. Created by the Indiana General Assembly in 1971, the role of ICHE is to:

  • plan and coordinate the state-supported system of post-secondary education;
  • review appropriation requests for post-secondary education and make recommendations to the governor, State Budget Agency, and General Assembly; and
  • approve or disapprove the establishment of any new branches, campuses, extension centers, colleges, or schools, and the offering of any new degree programs at the state's public institutions.

Purdue's leadership works collaboratively with ICHE to improve the quality of education throughout the state. ICHE is specifically prohibited by law from having any powers or authority relating to the management, operation, or financing of the state's public universities, all of which are responsibilities of their universities' governing boards.

Board of Trustees

The power and authority to manage Purdue University are vested by state law in a Board of Trustees [17] appointed by the governor. Title 21 of the Indiana Code specifies the powers and duties of Purdue's Board of Trustees. The Board's major responsibilities include:

  • determining student admission standards and awarding financial aid;
  • approving all academic degrees;
  • setting tuition, fees, and other charges;
  • establishing policies for the investment of University funds;
  • approving promotions and tenure of faculty;
  • approving the appointment of University officers and deans;
  • regulating student, faculty, and employee conduct;
  • approving the establishment of academic and operational divisions of the University; and
  • managing University property.

While the Board of Trustees has statutory authority and responsibility for governing the University, it has delegated the responsibility and commensurate authority for operating the University to the president, administrative staff, and faculty. This allows the trustees to focus on establishing University policy. The board meets a minimum of six times each year, and interacts with administrators, faculty, staff, and students on an ongoing basis.

The board is comprised of ten trustees, nine of whom who are appointed for three-year terms, and a student member, who serves a two-year term. Seven members are selected by the governor, with the remaining three selected by the Purdue Alumni Association from among its members. These three must all be Purdue graduates, with at least one being from the College of Agriculture. The governor selects the student trustee from a list of nominees forwarded by Purdue Student Government.

President

The president is the chief executive officer of the University and, subject to the control of the Board, manages, directs, and is responsible for the conduct of all University affairs except those which are made the specific responsibility of the treasurer or other persons [17]. The president has the following powers, duties, and authority:

  • in the name of the University, to make and execute, or authorize the making and execution of, all contracts and written instruments made in the ordinary course of the operations of the University, except those which must be specifically approved and authorized by the Board or executed by the Corporation; provided, however, that all contracts and written instruments imposing financial obligations on the part of the University shall first be approved by the treasurer or a person duly authorized by the treasurer;
  • all matters involving the trustees, except those assigned by statute or trustees' regulations to the treasurer;
  • all matters involving and all communications with federal and state government, the U.S. Congress, and the Indiana General Assembly, except where otherwise specifically provided by law;
  • all matters pertaining to and all communications with state agencies and organizations, such as the Indiana Commission for Higher Education;
  • review and approval of all University budgets for transmittal to the trustees;
  • recommendations to the Board of Trustees of all appointments;
  • selection of vice presidents, chancellors, and deans, and approval of all academic and administrative titles;
  • relationships with other colleges and universities, including statewide and inter-institutional telecommunications and radio; and
  • the University's Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Programs.

The president is assisted and advised by a cabinet [18], which meets monthly, and confers monthly with the deans of the academic colleges. Figure 1-4 shows an organizational chart for the Office of the President.

Figure 1-4. Purdue President's Direct Reports

Figure 1-4. Purdue President's Direct Reports

Source: Office of the President

Click to open image in a new window.

Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

The provost assists the president in all academic matters affecting the Purdue system, including coordinating and serving as liaison for curricular and faculty affairs at the regional campuses and Indiana University — Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) [19]. The provost:

  • serves as chief academic officer for the West Lafayette campus, with responsibility for faculty affairs, instruction, research, engagement, continuing education, and student services (exclusive of non-academic student counseling in the residence halls and the Purdue Memorial Union);
  • serves as chief academic officer for graduate education for the Purdue University system;
  • oversees academic services, including the libraries and academic computing facilities; and
  • coordinates academic planning for new and remodeled University facilities, and approves all assignments of space that affect the academic functions of the University.

The provost is advised by and meets regularly with the deans and senior members of the staff of the Office of the Provost. An organizational chart for the provost's office is included as
Figure 1-5.

Figure 1-5. Office of the Provost Organizational Chart

Figure 1-5. Office of the Provost Organizational Chart

Source: Office of the Provost

Click to open image in a new window.

Faculty Governance: University Senate

The governing body of the faculty, the University Senate exercises the legislative and policy-making powers assigned to the faculty, subject to review and check by the faculty only by established procedures. Therefore, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and in consultation with the president, the senate has the power and responsibility to propose or to adopt policies, regulations, and procedures intended to achieve Purdue's educational objectives and the general welfare of those involved in these educational processes.

The senate is composed of 102 members, including:

  • the president of the University;
  • the chief academic officer and chief fiscal officer of the University;
  • the chairperson and vice-chairperson of the University Senate;
  • four members elected by and representing the faculties of the regional campuses: one each from Calumet, Fort Wayne, North Central, and Indianapolis;
  • one undergraduate student member to be selected annually by the Student Senate and one graduate student member to be selected annually by that graduate student organization, and approved by the Graduate Council;
  • ninety-one faculty members apportioned among the faculty units according to the number of faculty members attached to the respective faculty unit, with the provision that no faculty unit shall have fewer than two members; and
  • between six and fifteen advisors appointed by the president from the administrative staff who have full floor privileges but no voting privileges.

The standing committees of the University Senate are the Steering Committee, Nominating Committee, Student Affairs Committee, Faculty Affairs Committee, Educational Policy Committee, University Resources Policy Committee, and the Advisory Committee. The senate may also create special committees with powers and duties as designated in the resolutions calling for their appointment.

Staff Governance

Purdue's policy is to consider suggestions and advice from University staff in formulating policies and addressing problems concerning their employment. To this end, advisory committees have been established to represent administrative and professional (A/P) staff and clerical and service staff. These committees serve as liaisons between staff and the central administration and provide representation on University committees.

The Administrative and Professional Staff Advisory Committee (APSAC) [20] was established in 1988 to build a formal communication link between A/P staff and the central administration. APSAC is composed of no more than 30 members who represent A/P staff from all segments of the campus community, including the regional campuses. There are five APSAC subcommittees: Communications, Compensation and Benefits, Membership and Staff Relations, Professional Development, and the Executive Committee.

APSAC has representatives on these important University committees: Campus Safety Task Force, Faculty Compensation and Benefits, Health Plan Advisory, Inside Purdue Board, Martin Award, OnePurdue Change Management and Communications Advisory, OnePurdue HR Advisory, OnePurdue Support and Training, Recycling, Spring Fling, Staff Appeal Board, and the Voluntary Benefits Task Force.

The Clerical and Service Staff Advisory Committee (CSSAC) [21] was established in 1965 to provide staff members with a means of participation, through suggestions and advice, in the formulation of employment policies; to provide an effective means of communication between the staff and the University administration; and to act in an advisory capacity and make recommendations to the human resource services department.

CSSAC consists of at least 10, and no more than 23, clerical and service staff representatives from the campus community, including the regional campuses. The six CSSAC subcommittees are: Bridge Suggestion, Communications, Employee Discount Program, Grants, Membership, and Purdue Employee Activity Program. CSSAC is also represented on these important University committees: Campus Campaign Steering Committee, Campus Safety Task Force, Child Care Advisory, Faculty Compensation and Benefits, Health Plan Advisory Committee, Inside Purdue Board, Martin Award, Parking and Traffic, Recycling, Recreational Sports Advisory, Spring Fling, Staff Appeal Board, and Voluntary Benefits Task Force.

Student Government

Separate governing bodies represent the undergraduate and graduate student populations at Purdue, and serve as liaisons between the students and the University administration.

Purdue Student Government (PSG) [22] is a student run and operated organization that advocates undergraduate student concerns to the student body, faculty, University administration and alumni, and community members. PSG is composed of an executive staff that oversees its three main branches:

  • the Senate, composed of students representing the various academic schools on campus, which is responsible for enacting legislation pertaining to the student body;
  • the Board of Directors, the outreach branch, responsible for advertising, planning, and sponsoring PSG events; and
  • the Student Court, the judicial arm, with jurisdiction over internal PSG grievances or trials, traffic ticket appeals for Purdue students, and all other PSG matters.

The Purdue Graduate Student Government (PGSG) [23] is the official graduate student organization which works to build a stronger academic community and to enhance the graduate students' social network. The PGSG is composed of members from each academic department. Monthly PGSG meetings are held during the academic year, at which the organization discusses graduate student ideas and concerns. The PGSG Executive Committee is responsible for developing and making proposals to the Graduate School administration.

The overall administrative structure at Purdue is designed to promote clear and effective leadership and to support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission. These structures are reviewed and revised when appropriate to accomplish the University's goals. Changes at the top of the administrative structure since the last accreditation visit include the addition of an executive director of strategic planning and assessment, who reports to the president; a change in the reporting relationship of the vice president for research, who now reports to the president rather than to the provost; and the planned addition of a vice president for human resources, who will report to the executive vice president for business and finance and treasurer.

Effective communication is crucial to the University's ability to accomplish its mission. Purdue's Web site makes a wealth of important information available to all of those served by the University. The site provides easy access to its strategic plans, the University's "Statement of Integrity," its diversity initiatives, faculty and student accomplishments, and the by-laws and constitutions of all its schools and divisions. The site was redesigned in 2008 to make information more readily accessible.

Various listservs allow faculty and staff to receive information targeted to their needs. Interested faculty, staff, and supporters receive Purdue Today, a detailed e-mail update of Purdue information, events, and accomplishments. The University newspaper, Inside Purdue [24], is published six times per year for faculty and staff on all Purdue campuses, and Purdue Perspective is produced three times a year and distributed worldwide to more than 400,000 alumni, parents of undergraduates, faculty and staff, and friends of the University.

back to top

Core Component 1e. The organization upholds and protects its integrity.

Purdue expends considerable effort to preserve its integrity by establishing and abiding by policies and procedures to address student, faculty, and staff rights and conduct, and research integrity, and to ensure the University's legal compliance as a state institution.

Policies concerning the University's internal constituencies address both rights and responsibilities, and appropriate recourse through grievance procedures. Purdue is committed to maintaining an environment of mutual respect that is free of harassment in any form [10]. The University's anti-harassment policy strives to protect its faculty, staff, and students, and prevent harassment on University property and during University-related activities that occur off campus.

A set of procedures is in place to resolve complaints of discrimination and harassment and to investigate possible circumstances of discrimination or harassment where no complaint, formal or informal, has been filed [25]. These policies include procedures for processing complaints with consideration for the complainant's privacy and policies for imposing sanctions against the respondent.

Purdue also has established procedures to address other types of conflict. When academic personnel have problems related to their employment that cannot be resolved informally, they may seek resolution through a grievance procedure [26]. This process is available to all faculty members, tenured and non-tenured, part-time or full-time, and all graduate student employees with the classification of graduate assistant, graduate instructor, graduate assistant in research, or graduate instructor in research. Likewise, a grievance policy for administrative/professional and clerical/service staff members provides for the resolution of employment-related situations [27].

The Student Bill of Rights addresses such issues as protection from discrimination, changes in graduation requirements, rights regarding student education records, freedom of expression and assembly, and full rights as citizens [28]. Guidelines for student conduct, disciplinary procedures, and the grade appeal process are specified in the student conduct guidelines [29], and a specific procedure has been established for grievances submitted to the University by students with disabilities [30].

Purdue considers compliance with laws pertaining to its role as a state institution to be essential to the University's integrity. The University is also diligent in training faculty and staff in their responsibilities regarding student data and other protected information, and in requiring appropriate certification [31]. These efforts and policies include:

  • FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974) [32] training and certification [33] and notifying students of their rights regarding academic records [34];
  • formation of a compliance task force for HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) privacy regulations on protected health information [35] and providing HIPAA compliance training [36] and certification [37];
  • safeguards for student loan and other financial information covered by GLBA (the Gramm Leach Bliley Act/Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999) [38] and GLBA training [39] and certification [40];
  • compliance with Title IX sex discrimination regulations [41];
  • faculty guidelines for teaching students with disabilities [42];
  • establishing a task force to review and manage HEOA (Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008) implementation, which addresses issues including the accessibility and affordability of higher education; and
  • revision of the University's research integrity policy [3].

Purdue's commitment to the equitable and respectful treatment of all the University's students, faculty, and staff guides the formulation of its policies and procedures. Through diligent adherence to these policies and procedures, the University strives to protect and enhance the institution's integrity.

back to top

Summary of Evidence

Purdue has engaged in two major strategic planning initiatives since the last accreditation review in 1999. Both plans consistently and clearly state a commitment to the University's mission of learning, discovery, and engagement. The vision, goals, and priorities outlined in each plan further define the University's mission and the constituents it serves. The campus monitors and assesses its progress in fulfilling its mission through benchmarking of key metrics against those of peer institutions, and through annual progress reports to the Board of Trustees. Priority-setting and the distribution of resources are guided largely by the goals and strategies set forth in the strategic plans.

Academic and administrative structures are periodically reviewed and realigned in support of the University's mission and goals, support that is also evident in strategic plans for individual colleges and schools, academic support offices, and business services. Purdue's mission, and its strategic plans, are broadly communicated to its constituents and the public through a wide variety of readily available print and electronic media, signaling the University's commitment to transparency and accountability.

Purdue's administrative structure is designed to promote clear and effective leadership. The Board of Trustees, administrative team, faculty, staff, and students all serve important, shared governance roles in directing many aspects of campus operations. The University strives to be inclusive and transparent when developing policies, procedures, and new initiatives. The "bottom up," highly inclusive process used in developing the New Synergies strategic plan highlights this approach and the value the University places on its stakeholders.

The University's mission, vision, and goals place a high priority on student learning and student access and success. Purdue is committed to providing its students with a comprehensive education that will give them the tools to succeed in a global society.

The University is openly committed to maintaining an inclusive community which recognizes and values diversity. Purdue believes that diversity among its members strengthens the institution, stimulates creativity, promotes the exchange of ideas, and enriches campus life. It is committed to growing campus diversity and to maintaining an environment of mutual respect. Policies and procedures are in place to uphold the integrity of the University and to address circumstances where its integrity is challenged, or where conflict resolution or individual assistance is needed. Through diligent adherence to these policies — such as the Student Bill of Rights and the Policy on Research Misconduct — which undergo periodic review and revision, the University operates with integrity to ensure equitable and respectful treatment of its faculty, staff, and students. Purdue also has a number of policies, professional staff, and task forces in place to maintain compliance with state and federal laws.

back to top

Challenges and Opportunities

Purdue will continue to carry out its stated mission with integrity and, thus, fulfill the requirements of this important criterion. As it strives to move forward toward the goals of the 2008–2014 strategic plan, some areas in which it will continue to seek improvement are:

  • increasing the social awareness and cultural competencies of students, faculty, and staff to better prepare them to meet global challenges;
  • continuing to evaluate the effectiveness of the University's policies and administrative structures related to diversity, inclusion, compliance, and ethics, and modify them as needed to meet the highest standards possible in these important areas of mission and governance; and
  • evaluating the University's organizational structure and modifying it as necessary to better achieve the goals of the current strategic plan and meet the evolving needs of those served by Purdue.
back to top

References

[1]Statement of Integrity for West Lafayette Campus. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/purdue/about/integrity_statement.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[2]Purdue University Student Conduct Code. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/odos/osrr/studentconductcode.php
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[3]Policy on Research Misconduct (VIII.3.1). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/POLICIES/pages/teach_res_outreach/viii_3_1.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[4]Purdue Nondiscrimination Policy Statement. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/policies/pages/human_resources/nondisc_pol.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[5]Faculty and Staff Online Handbook. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/faculty_staff_handbook/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[6]The Next Level: Preeminence, Strategic Plan 2001–2006. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/strategic_plan/2001-2006/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[7]2008–2014 Purdue Strategic Plan: New Synergies.Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/strategic_plan/SP-APPROVED_BY_BOT.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[8]Toward a Mosaic for Educational Equity: A Purdue Vision and Action Plan.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/provost/shtml/docs/mosaic.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[9]University Regulations 2009–2010. An Online Reference for Students, Staff, and Faculty.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/index.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[10]University Regulations 2008–2009, Part 4 – Equal Opportunity, Section II –
Anti-harassment Policy. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/state_equal/antiharassment.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[11]Governance Report, Academic Affairs Committee: Diversity. Purdue University.
https://www2.itap.purdue.edu/bot/viewDocument.cfm?id=3345
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[12]The Food Science Department 2008 Self-Study Report.
West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 2008.
(Resource Room)
[13]Purdue Liberal Arts Community Engagement Programs. Purdue University.
http://www.cla.purdue.edu/place/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[14]Doctor of Audiology (AuD) Program. Purdue University.
http://www.cla.purdue.edu/slhs/graduate/aud.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[15]Introducing the Purdue Engineering Logo. Purdue University.
https://engineering.purdue.edu/Engr/AboutUs/Logo/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[16]Commission for Higher Education, State of Indiana.
Purdue University.
http://www.itap.purdue.edu/web/apm/docs/004-Commission.pdf
(accessed October 7, 2009)
[17]Bylaws of the Trustees of Purdue University. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/bot/contribute_pdf_docs/BYLAWS_11_10_2006_000.pdf
(accessed October 7, 2009)
[18]Meet The President: Cabinet. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/president/administration/index.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[19]Administration: Delegation of Administrative Authority and Responsibility to Officers
Reporting to the President of the University (Executive Memorandum C-10).
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/POLICIES/pages/governance/c_10.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[20]Administrative and Professional Staff Advisory Committee Policies and Procedures.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/apsac/pdf/APSAC_Policies_and_Procedures.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[21]Protocols and Procedures: Clerical and Service Staff Advisory Committee.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/cssac/pdf/Protocols_Procedures_07.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[22]Purdue Student Government. Purdue University.
http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~psg/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[23]Purdue Graduate Student Government. Purdue University.
http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~pgsg/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[24]Inside Purdue Online. Purdue University.
http://news.uns.purdue.edu/insidepurdue/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[25]Procedures for Resolving Complaints of Discrimination and Harassment.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/state_equal/prc_harass.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[26]Grievance Procedures for Academic Personnel (C-19, Revised). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/policies/pages/human_resources/c_19.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[27]Grievance Policy for Administrative/Professional and Clerical/Service Staff Members
(IV.8.1). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/POLICIES/pages/human_resources/iv_8_1.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[28]Bill of Student Rights (West Lafayette Campus). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/stu_conduct/bill_right.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[29]Regulations Governing Student Conduct, Disciplinary Proceedings, and Appeals.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/stu_conduct/stu_regulations.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[30]Student Disability Grievance Procedure. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/state_equal/grievance.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[31]University Policies Regarding access to Student Data. Purdue University.
http://www.itap.purdue.edu/tlt/policies.cfm
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[32]Student Records: University Policy Regarding the "Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974" (as amended) (C-51), Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/policies/pages/records/c_51.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[33]FERPA Certification Process. Purdue University.
http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/SSTA/certifications
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[34]Student Records: Notification of Rights Under the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/univregs/pages/stu_rec/stu_rec.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[35]Compliance with HIPAA Privacy Regulations (VI.2.1). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/policies/pages/records/vi_2_1.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[36]HIPAA Compliance at Purdue. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/hipaa/
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[37]HIPAA Certification Process. Purdue University.
http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/SSTA/certifications
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[38]GLBA Security and Policy. Purdue University.
http://www.itap.purdue.edu/security/
policies/GLB_Safeguards_Rule_Training_General.pdf

(accessed December 1, 2009)
[39]GLBA Safeguards Rule Training. Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/securepurdue/files/GLBATrainingSlides.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[40]GLBA Certification Process. Purdue University.
http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/SSTA/certifications
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[41]Reaffirmation of University Policy on Equal Employment Opportunity and
Affirmative Action (D-1). Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/policies/pages/human_resources/d_1.html
(accessed December 1, 2009)
[42]Removing Barriers: Faculty Guidelines for Teaching Students with Disabilities.
Purdue University.
http://www.purdue.edu/odos/drc/barriers2.pdf
(accessed December 1, 2009)
back to top